Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Minding the Gap: The Tech Behind Making Transit More Equitable

13 views

Published on

During the National Regional Transportation Conference (June 2019, Columbus, OH), Nathan Gyori discussed the work of TransLoc to partner with the small city of Wilson, North Carolina. This work has included partnering with the city's transit agency to provide microtransit.

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Minding the Gap: The Tech Behind Making Transit More Equitable

  1. 1. MINDING THE GAP:THE TECH BEHIND MAKING TRANSIT MORE EQUITABLE TRANSLOC + CITY OF WILSON
  2. 2. TRANSIT IS CHANGING • Outdated Systems • Changing Demographics • Rising Transit Fares • Declining Ridership • Competition with low fuel prices • Technological Innovation
  3. 3. • First Mile / Last Mile • Lack of Coverage • Employment Access • Food Deserts • Outdated Systems • Underperforming Routes • Late-Night Transportation • Park and Ride Congestion COMMON TRANSIT CHALLENGES
  4. 4. TECHNOLOGY SHAPING EXPECTATIONS
  5. 5. EQUITY CHALLENGES • No Smartphone/Data access • Unbanked Households • Low-Income • Lack of Coverage • People with Disabilities • Culture & Language Barriers • Sociodemographic (Age, Literacy)
  6. 6. RETHINKING TRANSIT By rethinking how they handle city transit to focus on mobility engineering, city and transit leaders can drive economic development for businesses, individual citizens, and the city itself: Businesses across a city leverage easier access to a broader pool of employees of all ages and backgrounds, as well as greater access to consumers. Citizens enjoy a wealth of benefits, from greater access to jobs to easier and more secure access to shopping, exploring, dining, and running everyday errands—without the frustration of congested roads and packed parking lots. Cities take tax dollars further by combining more efficient high- capacity transit systems with agile mobility options through creative public and private partnerships.
  7. 7. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT With a more flexible and agile focus on mobility, cities can drive economic development in several important ways: Help citizens easily and affordably get to their jobs, education, shopping, and health care, promoting more vibrant, prosperous, and healthy communities. Take taxpayers’ dollars further with better transit efficiency and less spending on parking lots, road maintenance, and other physical infrastructure. Improve community opportunities and business connections by fostering better partnerships between private and public organizations. Best of all, the advantages of focusing on mobility are not limited to urban areas. in urban, suburban, and rural communities are embracing new approaches to mobility in order to drive economic development in their cities, towns, and regions.
  8. 8. WHAT IS MICROTRANSIT? RIDESHA RING Curb to CurbOn Demand Zone BasedRide Grouping MICROTR + Equitable Tech An on-demand transportation mode that leverages dynamic modeling, smaller vehicles, and innovative technology to augment and complement traditional fixed-route transit services.
  9. 9. AGENCY-OWNED MICROTRANSIT TransLocAgency + Flexible on demand services owned and operated by the transit agencies themselves
  10. 10. SOLVING FOR EQUITY CHALLENGES Scheduler
  11. 11. PILOT PROCESS Use Case Consulting & Simulation 01 Marketing & Launch Plan 02 Operational Pilot & Ongoing Support 03
  12. 12. CITY OF WILSON Challenge • City is 35 total sq miles • 5 underperforming routes • Lack of coverage/frequency • End to end, 1+ hour travel time Solution • Replace F/R with Demand Response • Increase coverage/frequency • Order curb to curb, on-demand + in-advance • Trip time <15 Minutes • Increase access to employment/health services
  13. 13. ADD TO CURRENT SYSTEM
  14. 14. MODIFY CURRENT SYSTEM
  15. 15. REPLACE ENTIRE SYSTEM
  16. 16. CONCLUSION • Shared mobility impacts everyone, not just users • Public agencies should ensure social, interregional and intergenerational equity to meet the basic transportation needs of travelers • Incorporation of shared mobility into transportation planning is critical • Clear and consistent definitions can help to clear confusion about modes and service models • Public agencies should embrace public and private collaboration • Public participation is key to involve the public and to listen to concerns when implementing shared mobility services (do surveys) • Public agencies should collect data and consider compulsory reporting requirements
  17. 17. QUESTIONS / CONTACT US Nathan Gyori Business Development Associate nathan.gyori@transloc.com (919) 973-3819

×