Rural Transportation Planning Trends and Issues

951 views

Published on

Presentation by Carrie Kissel, National Association of Development Organizations, at the FTA State Programs Meeting, August 7, 2013, in Washington, DC.

Published in: Technology, Real Estate
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
951
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
72
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
24
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Rural Transportation Planning Trends and Issues

  1. 1. NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF DEVELOPMENT ORGANIZATIONS Rural Transportation Planning  Trends and Issues Carrie Kissel National Association of Development Organizations with support from the Federal Highway Administration
  2. 2. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE About NADO  National association for 540 regional  development organizations, including emerging  network of Regional Transportation Planning  Organizations (RTPOs or RPOs)  Promote public policies that strengthen local  governments, communities and economies  through the regional strategies, coordination  efforts and program expertise of the nation’s  regional development organizations
  3. 3. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE Regional Development Organizations  Formed by state statute or executive order  May be called: Council of Governments, Regional  Planning Commission, Economic Development  District  Participate in/administer many state and federal  programs • Economic Development • Regional Planning • Human Services
  4. 4. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE 4
  5. 5. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE About RPO America  Program affiliate of NADO  Serves as the national professional association for  rural and small metro transportation planners  National Rural Transportation Peer Learning  Conference  www.RuralTransportation.org  Rural Transportation Newsletter  www.Facebook.com/RPOAmerica  Twitter @RPOAmerica
  6. 6. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE What’s Happening in Rural  Transportation Planning?
  7. 7. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE Rural Planning Organization •R‐Relationships •P‐Priority •O‐One • Communication is Essential
  8. 8. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE How Did We Get Here? • ISTEA (1991) – Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act • TEA‐21 (1998) – Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century • SAFETEA LU (2005) – Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act:  A  Legacy for Users  • 2003 FHWA/FTA planning regulations were adopted implementing  language on rural planning and state‐local consultation. (4 year  process ) • Same language used in 2007 regulations • In essence requires meaningful input by local officials in the  transportation planning process/decision making—separate from  public outreach efforts
  9. 9. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE 9
  10. 10. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE RTPO Governance Framework • Policy board/committee  – local elected officials or their designees, plus reps of  state, transportation providers, modal representatives,  & public – Often same as “parent” COG/RPC board • Technical committee  – to provide guidance and advice on practitioner‐level  issues – consider relationship with CEDS committee, including shared  membership and coordinating project identification and ranking  processes as appropriate • Fiscal agent  – to serve as management, planning, and administrative  support (COG/RPC)
  11. 11. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE Typical RTPO Tasks
  12. 12. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE Local Government Technical  Assistance • Be a general transportation resource • Assist with traffic counts, parking counts, local  roads issues • Convene local transit providers • Convene local road managers  • Learn major state/fed program categories to  answer questions about what projects are eligible  or assist with grantwriting • Joint purchasing opportunities
  13. 13. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE Facilitate Input in Statewide Plan • Invite DOT to participate in regional RTPO  board/committee meetings regularly – One meeting for DOT staff to attend, rather than  separate outreach every jurisdiction • Help DOT host regional local official forum, public  involvement forum • Offer to assist with reviewing projects in the  pipeline:  – What’s changed at local level?   – What’s still a priority?
  14. 14. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE Develop Regional Priorities • Help DOT to solicit project ideas for  available funds • Develop regional priority list:  – What can we agree on? – What issues/projects are most important? • Be realistic and strategic—may need to  focus on specific corridors or issues,  rather than needs of region’s entire  network
  15. 15. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE Connect State and Local Levels • Local jurisdictions may not have extensive  planning and zoning, but they still have a sense of  community direction • Where is development planned or desired? New  housing? New schools?  • Impact of those on transport network? • If there are upcoming construction or service  change projects, how will they impact  communities? – Assist with Context Sensitive Solutions – Assist with outreach to businesses and facilities located  on affected routes
  16. 16. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE General Transportation Challenges • Unpredictable funding levels • Shrinking resources for planning and  construction • Turnover—local officials, state officials, and  legislators • Long‐term horizon—benefit may not be  realized during term of office
  17. 17. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE RTPO Challenges • Recognize limits‐‐no national standards  until  MAP‐21, planning framework is voluntary • No uniform work program • Little, if any, financial authority • Keeping local officials engaged and committed to  the process • Lack of “buy‐in” by: DOT, Elected Officials, staff • Varying resources and capabilities among the  RTPOs: within state, between states • Turf‐‐Is there room in the sandbox?
  18. 18. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE What are RTPOs doing  about transit?
  19. 19. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE Work Program Elements • Ensure transit providers, interests are  aware of and invited to table • Gather, prioritize 5311 applications • Inventory existing services • Mobility management • Coordinated planning • Assist providers with planning service
  20. 20. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE Emerging Issues and Themes • Increasing focus on mobility • Ability to convene partners • Relationships with human services entities • Access to regional data • Experience in data analysis, mapping,  database development • Connections to economic trends
  21. 21. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE GA: Transit Development Plans GDOT contracts with regional commissions to:  • Assist local governments with transit planning: – Identify areas, populations of need – Inventory, assess existing services – Develop support organizations – Present a plan or vision – Obtain local support
  22. 22. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE GA: Transit Development Plans GDOT contracts with regional commissions to:  • Organize and facilitate community meetings to  develop “transit development plans” • Facilitate completion of environmental tasks for  transit earmark projects
  23. 23. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE GA: Essential Elements of TDPs  • Executive Summary • Demographic Analysis • Goals & Objectives • Performance Evaluation of Existing Service • Demand Estimation, Transit Needs Assessment • Transit Alternatives  & Recommendations • Compliance with Federal & State Requirements • Five Year Capital and Operating Projections • Adoption of the Plan
  24. 24. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE Arizona: Coordinated Planning State Context ADOT Uses 9 Planning  Regions to:  • Improve management of  existing assets • AZ Institute 4 Coordination • Strengthen Regional  Human Service  Coordination Plans • Develop Coordination  Councils
  25. 25. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE
  26. 26. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE Northern AZ: Projects Underway • Sr. Cntr – Para Transit  • COG AAA – NOMT  • COG – MPO Senior Transportation  Network Development • COG AAA – Para Transit Voucher NON EMERG  MEDICAL NACOG  AAA Senior  Center DTD  PROJECT
  27. 27. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE Lowcountry COG & Partners (SC) Conditions for Coordination/ Consolidation: • ONE well‐established public transit service provider • Large, sparsely settled area • Many human service agencies discovering they do  not want to be in “transportation business” • Purchase of Service contracts (with 5310 funding)  with the transit provider an important option • Opportunities for sharing routes • Potential for multiple funding sources 27
  28. 28. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE SCDOT Coordination Plan 2007 Regional Transportation Needs  • More service for medical appointments, urban  and rural • Work trips—to Hilton Head Island, Bluffton,  within and between all of the COG counties • Interregional medical trips (outside of COG  region Charleston, Savannah) • General public transportation  • Retirees and other older people • Youth (after school) transportation • Fixed route/fixed schedule services 28
  29. 29. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE 2013 Service Consolidation:  SCDOT Coordination Plan 2007 Challenges Facing Agencies Met by 2013  through Consolidation √ 1. Need to move away from 48‐hour advanced  reservation; more spontaneous trips √ 2. Cost of fuel 29
  30. 30. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE Service Consolidation:  SCDOT Coordination Plan 2007 3. Need to upgrade vehicles, equipment  √ 4. Need for additional funding for expanded  services √ 5. Implementation of a mechanism to centralize  transportation services,  i.e., lacking  a mobility  manager √ 6. Need for technology to coordinate trips among  agencies, across jurisdictional lines √ 7. Vehicle assets rapidly deteriorating √ 30
  31. 31. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE CTAA/Lowcountry Plan 2012 Evaluated Five Potential Structures/Strategies 1. Consolidated Structure: Nonprofit and public  agencies consolidate transportation into  Palmetto Breeze 2. Brokerage Structure: Palmetto Breeze brokers  trips to participating transportation providers,  operates public/coordinated transportation 3. Hybrid Structure: Some participating  organizations consolidate, others serve as  independent, contracted service providers   31
  32. 32. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE CTAA/Lowcountry Plan 2012 Evaluated Five Potential Structures/Strategies 4. Coordination: Shared use of vehicles, staff,  maintenance, training, grant writing 5. Information and Referral: Mobility Manager  continues to refer passengers, uses technology  to promote efficiency 32
  33. 33. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE Coastal Regional Commission (GA): Rural Commuter Vanpooling • Contract with VPSI • Target workforce living 10+ miles away,  those unable to conveniently use fixed‐route  transit • Provide service as groups are identified, with  the riders deciding where and when a route  operates • Save costs for workers, promote productivity  for employers
  34. 34. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE Iowa: Rural Transit Planning • Regional Planning Affiliations created post‐ ISTEA • Most are co‐terminus with regional transit  boundaries – Some housed in same parent org as transit • Transit planning, coordination plans • Emerging issues: connect workforce  development/employment transportation 34
  35. 35. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE Thomas Jefferson PDC (VA) • The TJPDC received a grant from the Virginia Board of  People with Disabilities to develop and expand the use of  the Transportation Housing Alliance Toolkit.   • This funding focuses on 3 deliverables: • Work also involves training and presentations to localities  and PDCs throughout the state. 35 ‐ Six case studies in the region to focus on assessing the inclusiveness of  local ordinances, procedures and plans. ‐ A standardized assessment tool to identify gaps. ‐ A list of common barriers to meeting needs. ‐ Model language that localities can consider for adoption to address  those gaps 
  36. 36. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE Southwest RPC (NH): Rural TDM Travel Demand Management Advocacy Group • Public & private sector • Meeting since 2006 • Advocacy, education, leadership • Role of transportation on economy, environment and  society • Monadnock Region Transportation Management  Association • Web‐based toolkit 
  37. 37. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE Web‐Based TDM Toolkit • Clearinghouse of information • Accessible  • User friendly  • Diverse audience • Residents/visitors • Employers • Educators • Municipal officials www.monadnocktma.org
  38. 38. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE Web‐Based TDM Toolkit Information on transportation options Employer toolkit  Guide for municipalities   Materials for Educators and Schools 
  39. 39. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE RTPOs and State DOTs: Opportunities for Transit Planning Use regional partners to: • Leverage investments: transportation  service supports changes in population,  land use, economic, and local quality of  place efforts • Identify an area’s economic assets that  may be key service destinations
  40. 40. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE RTPOs and State DOTs: Opportunities for Transit Planning Use regional partners to: • Innovate in outreach, service delivery,  planning frameworks • Partner with new organizations—major  employers?  Community foundations?   Other local institutions?
  41. 41. RURAL PLANNING PRACTICE Additional Resources www.NADO.org www.RuralTransportation.org Carrie Kissel ckissel@nado.org 202.624.8829

×