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Bike&Place: An Easy-to-Use Tool for Designing Active, Place-Making Transportation Networks

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During the 2017 National Regional Transportation Conference,
Brian Morton shared his work on using GIS to analyze bike-friendliness in the core of a small town wishing to better connect its central area to a popular multi-use rail trail. This methodology is replicable in other small town contexts.

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
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Bike&Place: An Easy-to-Use Tool for Designing Active, Place-Making Transportation Networks

  1. 1. Bike&Place An Easy-to-Use Tool for Designing Active, Place-Making Transportation Networks Brian J. Morton Center for Urban and Regional Studies University of North Carolina June 28, 2017
  2. 2. 2 INSPIRATIONS
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  4. 4. 4 Roger Geller’s Typology of Actual and Potential Cyclists • “Four Types of Cyclists” https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/article/264746 • Applies to • Adults • Utilitarian – not recreational – transportation 1. Strong and fearless 2. Enthused and confident 3. Interested but concerned 4. No way no how Inspirations
  5. 5. 5 Project’s Goal For planners with basic GIS skills and no travel demand modeling experience… A simple, customizable travel demand model that helps small town and city planners… increase bicycle accessibility to heart-and-soul destinations… taking into account the preferences of interested but concerned cyclists Inspirations
  6. 6. 6 WHAT YOU CAN DO WITH Bike&Place Houston (Mississippi) Design Exercise
  7. 7. 7 Heart-and-soul destination: Courthouse Square Case study
  8. 8. 8 Interested but Concerned Cyclists “They like riding a bicycle…and they would like to ride more. But, they are afraid to ride….Very few of these people regularly ride bicycles…[and they] will not venture out onto the arterials to the major commercial and employment destinations they frequent.…They would ride if they felt safer on the roadways—if cars were slower and less frequent, and if there were more quiet streets with few cars and paths without any cars at all.” (Geller, p. 3) Inspirations
  9. 9. 9 Traffic Stress Criteria: Simplified, Impressionistic Approach • Spatial context • Residential neighborhood: presumption of low stress • Industrial district: presumption of high stress • Posted speed • Distance between cars/trucks and bicycles • Traffic volume • Bike lane • On-street parking Case study
  10. 10. 10 Scenario Assessments: Bicycle Accessibility to Heart-and-Soul Destination • Current conditions network • < 2% of populated census blocks have bicycle access to Courthouse Square • High-interest, low traffic stress network • Low traffic stress on links near heart-and-soul destination • 83% of populated census blocks have bicycle access to Courthouse Square Case study
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  13. 13. 13 Houston’s High and Low Traffic Stress Networks in 3D Case study
  14. 14. 14 ADAPTING Bike&Place TO YOUR LOCALE
  15. 15. 15 Data Needs Are Minimal 1. Roads shapefile 2. Population (census block) shapefile 3. Traffic stress ratings Adaptation
  16. 16. 16 The Tools That You Need Are Readily Available • ArcMap • ArcGlobe • 3D visualization of networks • Nice to have but not essential • Excel • TRANUS • Simplified but sophisticated travel demand modeling platform • Open source (http://www.tranus.com/tranus- english/download-install/) • Houston case-study files (contact me – see last slide) Adaptation
  17. 17. 17 Major Tasks • Create current-conditions network • Create counterfactual “low traffic stress network” • Create origin-destination table for trips from populated census blocks to heart-and-soul destination • Define link types, travel modes, and trip category • Import networks and O-D table into TRANUS • Calibrate travel demand model’s parameters • Create design scenario • Assess current-conditions and design scenarios Adaptation
  18. 18. 18Adaptation [https://stride.ce.ufl.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/BikePlace_Report-2016-009S.pdf]
  19. 19. 19 Contact Information Brian J. Morton, Ph.D. Center for Urban and Regional Studies University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC (919) 962-8847 bjmorton[at]unc.edu Adaptation

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