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Achieving Safety Results by Addressing Behavioral Issues

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During the 2017 National Regional Transportation Conference, Nicole Waldheim addressed behavioral issues related to transportation safety that can be addressed by regional transportation planning organizations and their safety partners.

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Achieving Safety Results by Addressing Behavioral Issues

  1. 1. Achieving Safety Results by Addressing Behavioral Issues June 28, 2017 Presented by: Nicole Waldheim, Cambridge Systematics
  2. 2. Session Agenda • Welcome and Introductions • Importance of Transportation Safety – Human Factors and Crashes • Opportunities to Engage in Behavioral Safety • Resources to Address Behavioral Safety • Key Takeaways 7
  3. 3. Session Objectives 3 • Summarize the need to address transportation safety and move towards zero deaths through behavioral solutions • Discuss how RTPOs can become engaged in behavioral safety and fund solutions • Work through the steps to identify and address behavioral solutions
  4. 4. Behavioral Safety • The factors contributing to a crash generally fall into three categories – human, vehicle, and roadway/environment • Human factors are attributes of the driver that may contribute to a crash 4 Common Human Risk Factors • Distraction • Drowsy • Impairment (drugs or alcohol) • Not buckling up • Aggressive Driving/Speeding • Age • Exposure (bike/pedestrian, motorcycle)
  5. 5. Why Address Human Factors 5
  6. 6. Introductions/Information Sharing • Name • Agency • Based on crash data or anecdotal evidence, what is the biggest behavioral safety issue in your planning area? • Have you been able to address behavioral needs in your planning area? If yes, how? 6
  7. 7. Importance of Transportation Safety
  8. 8. National Transportation Safety Facts • Over 40,000 estimated motor vehicle fatalities in 2016 – 6% increase from 2015 and 14% increase from 2014 • During daylight hours, 660,000 drivers are using cell phones while driving (2017 NHTSA Report) • In 2015, motor vehicle fatalities was the single largest cause of death for persons aged 15-29. • In 2015, alcohol-impaired driving was involved in 29 percent of traffic fatalities 8
  9. 9. Rural Transportation Safety Facts • 19 % of the US population lives in rural areas, but rural fatalities account for 49% of all fatalities (2015) • Of the 35,092 traffic fatalities in 2015, 17,114 (49%) occurred in rural areas • Rural fatalities increased 2% from 2014 to 2015 • For fatalities occurring in rural areas, 50% of passengers were unrestrained – 61% of rural pickup truck occupants killed were unrestrained. 9
  10. 10. Toward Zero Deaths – You Can Contribute • National strategy, adopted by many transportation agencies, that envisions a transportation system free of fatalities – Engineering Solutions • Roadway Design • Countermeasures • Speed Limits – Behavioral Solutions • Law Enforcement • Education/Outreach Campaigns • Emergency Response – Vehicle Solutions • Connected and Autonomous Vehicles 10
  11. 11. Be Part of the Solution • Some ninety percent of motor vehicle crashes are caused at least in part by human error. • Participate in/convene safety meetings • Identify top contributing factors to crashes • Identify/Participate in solutions • Find partners and resources 11
  12. 12. Opportunities to Engage in Behavioral Safety Collaboration
  13. 13. 13 Opportunities to Coordinate on Behavioral Safety • SHSP teams or committees • Highway Safety Office coalitions (i.e. safe communities) • Regional or local safety committees • Law Enforcement, Insurance companies, Major employers, Universities/Colleges, Drivers Education, Non-profits (MADD, AARP) Participate on Existing Groups Establish a Group 13 Examples of Stakeholders to Engage • Houma Regional Transportation Safety Plan • North Shore Regional Transportation Plan • Bozeman Community Traffic Safety Plan • Destination Safe Coalition (MARC)
  14. 14. Community Traffic Resource Center 14
  15. 15. Key Partner Highway Safety Office • Every state has a Highway Safety Office • Responsible for planning and implementing programs to address behavioral traffic safety issues • Develop Highway Safety Plans (HSPs) every July and Annual Reports (AR) every December – HSP is data driven and outlines programs eligible for NHTSA grants – Applications for grants every January/February – Annual report demonstrates progress on previous years programs and performance • Administer Federal Grants (402 and 405) 15
  16. 16. Highway Safety Office Resources • Listing of every State’s Highway safety plan – https://one.nhtsa.gov/links/StateDocs/pages/Sa fetyPlans.htm – Search “highway safety plan nhtsa” • NHTSA Countermeasures That Work – https://www.nhtsa.gov/sites/nhtsa.dot.gov/files/ 812202-countermeasuresthatwork8th.pdf • NHTSA Grants Program – https://www.nhtsa.gov/highway-safety-grants- program 16
  17. 17. Opportunities to Engage in Behavioral Safety Data Analysis and Strategy Development
  18. 18. Contributing Factors Analysis • Analysis Areas • Who is involved in a crash (age & gender) • What is involved in a crash (number & type of vehicle) • When the crash occurred (year, month, date, hour) • Where the crash occurred (segment, intersection, transportation analysis zone, other) • Why a crash occurs (behavioral & infrastructure factors) • What it Does • Provides high level information on crash characteristics • Identifies areas of concern (emphasis areas) 18
  19. 19. Contributing Factor Data • Minimum – Total crashes and/or total fatalities & serious injuries – Demographics (i.e. age, gender, time of day, day of week, location) – Collision type (i.e. run off road, rear-end) – Behavioral Factors (i.e. impairment, seatbelt usage) • Optional Data – Person data (i.e. repeat offenses) – Motor vehicle make, type, & total occupants – Crash incidence data (i.e. roadway conditions) 19
  20. 20. 2020 Identify The Key Risks Contributing Factor Analysis • Obtain 5 years of crash data for your planning area – Fatalities, Serious Injuries, and/or All Crashes • Depends on what is available • Also want to have a sufficient sample size – For data received, also need to request contributing factor information • Many states have a crash data portal to assist with this type of request or can complete a custom request 20
  21. 21. 2121 Identify the Key Risks Types of Contributing Factor Analysis 49.1% 35.3% 31.8% 19.6% 18.4% 17.9% 15.5% 14.8% 8.6% 6.5% 5.9% 3.8% 2.1% 1.9% 0% 8% 16% 24% 32% 40% 48% 56% RoadwayDeparture Intersection Speeding YoungDriver Unrestrained Alcohol AgingDriver DistractedDriver Motorcycle LargeVehicle Pedestrian DrowsyDriver Drugs Bicycle Traffic Deaths and Severe Injuries 2001 to 2015 Traffic Fatalities and Serious Injuries 2011 to 2015 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Under influence of alcohol Distracted Speeding Bicycle/ Pedestrian Young driver Unbelted Fatal (K) Serious Injury (A) Evident Injury (B) Possible Injury (C) PDO0.1% 0.7% 0.7% 7.0% 1.8% 2.7% 2.8% 7.7% 18.1% 4.6% 4.3% 21.3% 14.0% 13.3% 21.4% 21.2% 13.1% 56.4% Train-Related Bicycle Work Zone-Related Distracted Driving-Related Drowsy Driving ATV Involved Pedestrian Motorcycle Involved Intersection-Related CMV Involved Involved Driver with Invalid License Young Driver Involved Older Driver Involved Speeding-Related Aggressive Driving-Related Occupant Protection Alcohol- or Drug-Related Roadway Departure-Related 0.3% 0.3% 0.8% 1.1% 1.5% 6.0% 6.2% 9.6% 9.9% 11.8% 13.4% 14.2% 19.4% 29.7% 42.2% 47.1% 53.1% 65.0% All Fatal and Serious Injury Crashes Serious Injuries Fatalities
  22. 22. 2222 Identify the Key Risks Prioritize Contributing Factors • Number of fatalities and serious injuries • Crash Severity • Percent of Fatal Crashes Higher than Total Crashes • Fatality and Serious Injury Trends • Stakeholder Input Commercial Vehicles Bicycles Inattentive Drivers Unlicensed Drivers Pedestrians Unrestrained Occupants Motorcycles Alcohol (No Drugs) Older Drivers (65+) Alcohol and/or Other Drugs Speed-Related Young Drivers (15-25) Intersections Aggressive Driving Roadway Departure CrashSeverity Crash Frequency 31.3% 16.3% 2.4% 2.3% 2.2% 0.8% 0.5% 44.3% 15.9% 9.0% 0.6% 6.9% 4.8% 1.2% 31.3% 20.8% 18.8% 2.1% 5.2% 25.0% 4.2% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% 50% Aggressive/ careless driving Lane departure Alcohol or drugs use suspected Improper passing Speeding Pedestrian involved Bicyclist involved Total Severe Fatal Potential Emphasis Area 2009 Fatal and Serious Injury Crashes Annual Change Average Annual Change, 2009-2013 (5-Year Trend line Slope)2010 2011 2012 2013 Roadway Departure Crashes 747 6.2% 11.2% -0.3% -8.8% +19.6 per Year Aggressive Driving Involved 501 9.4% 10.0% -6.0% -3.4% +11.3 per Year +36.2 per YearIntersections Crashes 419 19.1% 15.2% 1.0% -3.8% +36.2 per Year Young Drivers - 15-25 Involved 401 20.7% 6.0% 0.4% -12.0% +13.5 per Year Speed-Related Crashes 379 11.1% 7.6% -8.4% -3.9% +3.4 per Year Alcohol and/or Other Drugs Involved 288 -2.8% 29.3% 11.3% -10.2% +27.1 per Year +14.5 per YearOlder Drivers - 65+ Involved 271 5.9% 13.9% 7.6% -11.6% +14.5 per Year Alcohol Involved (No Drugs) 246 -2.8% 32.2% 8.9% -12.8% +21.3 per Year Unrestrained Occupants 203 -16.3% 35.9% -2.6% -11.1% +4.9 per Year +15.6 per YearMotorcycle Involvement 198 3.5% 20.5% 14.6% -16.3% +15.6 per Year Pedestrian(s) Injured or Killed 128 21.1% 5.8% 6.1% -14.4% +6.1 per Year Unlicensed Drivers Involved 89 -4.5% 60.0% 14.7% -12.2% +16.7 per Year Pedalcycle(s) Injured or Killed 66 -33.3% 81.8% -1.3% -17.7% +3.3 per Year Inattentive Drivers Involved 55 29.1% 11.3% 1.3% -18.8% +2.9 per Year Commercial Motor Vehicle Involved 49 49.0% 12.3% -35.4% 22.6% +1.2 per Year
  23. 23. 2323 Identify the Key Risks Digging Deeper 23 0.0% 0.0% 7.1% 0.4% 0.4% 5.8% 2.1% 2.5% 4.1% 6.2% 21.1% 4.1% 9.8% 24.6% 17.0% 22.5% Train-Related Bicycle Intersection-Related Pedestrian Work zone-Related Distracted Driving-Related Drowsy Driving ATV Involved CMV Involved Motorcycle Involved Young Driver Involved Involved Driver with Invalid License Older Driver Involved Occupant Protection Alcohol- or Drug-Related Speeding / Aggressive Driving-Related 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.2% 0.7% 1.0% 1.6% 6.7% 8.6% 8.9% 13.8% 14.2% 14.7% 54.9% 59.0% 60.0% Roadway Departure Serious Injury and Fatality Crashes Serious Injuries Fatalities
  24. 24. You Have All This Data, Now What? • Share this information with relevant stakeholders – State DOT – Highway Safety Office – Local/Regional Coalitions • Establish emphasis areas • Customize strategies and actions from SHSP or HSP • Develop strategies and actions using 4E stakeholder engagement Less Resource Intensive Additional Resources and Time
  25. 25. Review and Customize Strategies from SHSP or HSP 25
  26. 26. Develop Strategies and Actions 26
  27. 27. Communicating the Safety Message 27
  28. 28. Opportunities to Engage in Behavioral Safety Implementation Ideas
  29. 29. Support Existing Efforts 29
  30. 30. 30 Support Existing Efforts 30
  31. 31. 3131 Marketing Materials You Can Use/Customize www.trafficsafetymarketing.gov
  32. 32. 32 Promote Behavioral Safety on Website
  33. 33. Share Information on Behavioral Safety 33
  34. 34. 34 Conduct Surveys
  35. 35. 35 Use Crash Data Infographics and Information to Raise Awareness
  36. 36. 36 Participate in/Lead a Behavioral Effort
  37. 37. Participate in/Lead a Behavioral Effort • Identify bicycle and pedestrian behavioral safety issues – 4E Committee and Data • Identify local and state laws that address the issues • Prioritize the issues – Online Questionnaire • Research existing campaigns (state and nation) that exist in the public domain • Identify a campaign that addressed our concerns – sought permission to co-brand
  38. 38. Resources to Address Behavioral Safety Funding
  39. 39. Highway Safety Office – NHTSA Funding • 402 Funding - State and Community Highway Safety Program • 405 - National Priority Safety Programs – (b) addresses occupant protection, – (c) is for improving traffic safety information and data systems, – (d) is for impaired driving and ignition interlock laws – (e) is for distracted driving, – (f) is for motorcycle safety, – (g) is to encourage graduated drivers licensing programs, and – (h) is for nonmotorized roadway user programs 39
  40. 40. How to Apply • Review priority areas in HSP – Impaired, speed, distracted • Identify overlapping priority areas • Determine which strategies align • Attend an annual grant training seminar (January) • Submit an application/participate in an application (January/February) 40
  41. 41. Resources to Address Behavioral Safety Conclusion
  42. 42. 42 Finding Solutions to the Behavioral Issues Bring data analysis to the table Bring together 4E stakeholders to discuss safety issues Identify strategies and actions to address behavioral issues in your planning area Find funding to implement behavioral programs Lead or actively participate in initiatives/programs to address behavioral safety Work with data analyzed by others Join an existing group or participate in meetings Adopt or follow existing strategies and actions Learn about funding opportunities Lend support to existing behavioral initiatives High Level of EffortLow Level of Effort
  43. 43. Key Takeaways • What are your next steps?
  44. 44. Contact Information If you have any questions related to this presentation, please contact the instructors at: NWaldheim@camsys.com To learn more about the National Center for Rural Road Safety : http://ruralsafetycenter.org/about-our-center/history-of-the- safety-center/ 44

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