PLACE-BASED POVERTY:
INTERSECTIONS & APPROACHES
Dr. Scott Tate
Extension Specialist, VCE
Research Associate, Virginia Tech...
Poverty as Pressing Public Problem
Place-Poverty Links
Why place/neighborhoods matter?
Problems are ―bundled‖
Some contributing factors
Structural
Impediments
Distancing
Low
Efficacy
Promising approaches that
attempt to address all 3
concerns?
Promising Approaches?
•Turning the Tide on Poverty/(& Circles)
•Neighborhood Identity Projects
•Neighborhood Microenterpri...
Crystal Tyler Mackey, Ph.D., Team Leader
cmtyler@vt.edu
662-325-3207
srdc.msstate.edu/tide
Purpose of the 11-State Project
• Explore the causes of poverty.
• Talk about possible solutions.
• Select strategies that...
How This Project Helps
• Fosters broad community involvement
– Everyone is welcome!
• Provides a clear process to help peo...
Early Outcomes in Virginia
(Greensville/Emporia)
Mobile Food Pantry Starts Coming to Town
Community Garden Started
Youth C...
Circles
• National program that
brings together low-
income people and
middle-class
community members
who want to work
tog...
Impacts….
www.circlesusa.org
Neighborhood Identity
• Waukesha, Wisco
nsin
• Milwaukee, Wisco
nsin
Waukesha – Extension Project
Milwaukee, WI: Walnut Way
Local, Slow, & Steady: Taking small actions
that give people a sense of pride in their
neighborh...
Neighborhood Microenterprise
Minnesota Examples
Virginia example = Richmond
Common Elements from the Approaches?
• Neighborhood Scale
• Individuals as Change
Agents
• Intensity of Focus
• Build soci...
Opportunities & Contact
• New River Valley Dialogue on Poverty:
• Saturday, October 19, 9-12 am.
• Neighborhood Developmen...
Place Based Poverty Intersections and Approaches - Scott Tate
Place Based Poverty Intersections and Approaches - Scott Tate
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  • Here is a closer look at how we are proposing to address the concern. Ultimately, our goal is to bring the community together to take action to fight poverty. This will take several steps including: Exploring the causes of povertyTalking about possible solutionsSelecting strategies that fit our community, and Working together for changeWhen we have finished the process, we will have a Community Action Plan that we have developed together that fits our community’s vision and needs.
  • Turning the Tide on Poverty Community Circles helps with all of these barriers by welcoming everyone, providing a clear process, helping people understand how an issue related to them personally, and creating a community-wide partnership that joins citizens and leaders together to address community issues.
  • The five states selected in Year One were: Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, and OklahomaIn Year Two, seven new states join the initiative: Arkansas, Florida, Kentucky, North Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia
  • Place Based Poverty Intersections and Approaches - Scott Tate

    1. 1. PLACE-BASED POVERTY: INTERSECTIONS & APPROACHES Dr. Scott Tate Extension Specialist, VCE Research Associate, Virginia Tech Institute for Policy and Governance
    2. 2. Poverty as Pressing Public Problem
    3. 3. Place-Poverty Links
    4. 4. Why place/neighborhoods matter?
    5. 5. Problems are ―bundled‖
    6. 6. Some contributing factors Structural Impediments Distancing Low Efficacy
    7. 7. Promising approaches that attempt to address all 3 concerns?
    8. 8. Promising Approaches? •Turning the Tide on Poverty/(& Circles) •Neighborhood Identity Projects •Neighborhood Microenterprise
    9. 9. Crystal Tyler Mackey, Ph.D., Team Leader cmtyler@vt.edu 662-325-3207 srdc.msstate.edu/tide
    10. 10. Purpose of the 11-State Project • Explore the causes of poverty. • Talk about possible solutions. • Select strategies that fit the community. • Work together for change. End product: Citizens develop & implement a Community-Based Action Plan.
    11. 11. How This Project Helps • Fosters broad community involvement – Everyone is welcome! • Provides a clear process to help people get involved in meaningful ways. • Increases personal ownership to the community and to the issue. • Creates a community partnership in which leadership and citizens join hands in addressing community issues.
    12. 12. Early Outcomes in Virginia (Greensville/Emporia) Mobile Food Pantry Starts Coming to Town Community Garden Started Youth Council Started Organizations Recognized for New Efforts to Address Poverty – including recognition from Sen. Warner Weeklong Effort Entitled ―Reach Up‖ held with focus on health issues, leadership development, and youth obesity Many additional partnerships were formed http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EW81nvX5Xkc
    13. 13. Circles • National program that brings together low- income people and middle-class community members who want to work together
    14. 14. Impacts…. www.circlesusa.org
    15. 15. Neighborhood Identity • Waukesha, Wisco nsin • Milwaukee, Wisco nsin
    16. 16. Waukesha – Extension Project
    17. 17. Milwaukee, WI: Walnut Way Local, Slow, & Steady: Taking small actions that give people a sense of pride in their neighborhood—and trust in their neighbors
    18. 18. Neighborhood Microenterprise Minnesota Examples
    19. 19. Virginia example = Richmond
    20. 20. Common Elements from the Approaches? • Neighborhood Scale • Individuals as Change Agents • Intensity of Focus • Build social ties • Reduce divides • Link to Resources • Address more than one ―problem‖
    21. 21. Opportunities & Contact • New River Valley Dialogue on Poverty: • Saturday, October 19, 9-12 am. • Neighborhood Development in Roanoke. • Contact Office of Neighborhood Services: Bob.Clement@roanokeva.gov • Feedback, Follow-Up to Me & Connecting with Extension Resources • Scott Tate, atate1@vt.edu 540.315.2062

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