Paris Peace Conference

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Paris Peace Conference

  1. 1. The Paris Peace Conference Designing the Future of Europe and The World
  2. 2. The End of The Great War <ul><li>The Great War ended on November 11, 1918 at 11:00am </li></ul><ul><li>Ally delegates met in January of 1919 to decide the peace terms that would be IMPOSED on Germany and the Central Powers. </li></ul>
  3. 3. The Challenges <ul><li>Old European political structure in ruins. </li></ul><ul><li>“ The war to end all wars.” </li></ul><ul><li>Differing national agendas. </li></ul><ul><li>The influenza epidemic (The Spanish Flu, 1918-1920) </li></ul>
  4. 5. The Different National Agendas… <ul><li>Each of the major powers had their own ideas about how to settle this peace, and these ideas were often conflicting. </li></ul><ul><li>The Big Three: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Woodrow Wilson, President of the US </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Georges Clemenceau, President of France </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>David Lloyd George, Prime Minister of Great Britain. </li></ul></ul>
  5. 6. Georges Clemenceau <ul><li>Clemenceau represented France, France suffered a tremendous amount of damage. </li></ul><ul><li>Clemenceau wanted Germany to pay for the cost of this war. </li></ul><ul><li>Cripple their economy so they will never be capable of doing this again. </li></ul>
  6. 7. Woodrow Wilson <ul><li>Wilson represented the US, relatively untouched by the war. </li></ul><ul><li>Americans were isolationists. </li></ul><ul><li>Wilson wanted a lasting peace in Europe. </li></ul><ul><li>Worried that a harsh punishment would just breed resentment and result in another conflict. </li></ul><ul><li>He really wanted to bring democracy to the Balkans to maintain stability. </li></ul>
  7. 8. David Lloyd George <ul><li>Lloyd George represented Great Britain, the world’s largest economic superpower. </li></ul><ul><li>Britain wanted a lasting peace in Europe. </li></ul><ul><li>Lloyd George also wanted to ensure that Germany could be a strong trading partner. </li></ul>
  8. 9. Wilson’s Fourteen Points <ul><li>In January of 1918, Wilson wrote a document that to rationalize the war to an American public who were less than enthused. </li></ul><ul><li>He used the same principals as his guiding ideals one year later at the Paris Peace Conference. </li></ul><ul><li>This document shaped the next 20 years and it is crucial to understand it. </li></ul><ul><li>Guiding Principals: Open Diplomacy, Self-Determination, Democratization </li></ul>
  9. 10. The Most Important Points <ul><li>Outlawing alliances. </li></ul><ul><li>Freedom of the seas. </li></ul><ul><li>Free trade. </li></ul><ul><li>Disarmament. </li></ul><ul><li>Return of (Russian) territories conquered by Germany. </li></ul><ul><li>Alsace-Lorraine returned to France. </li></ul><ul><li>Formation of a League of Nations. </li></ul><ul><li>Self-Determination. </li></ul>
  10. 11. Self-Determination <ul><li>Wilson’s baby. </li></ul><ul><li>Idea: Peoples (ethnic minorities) would vote on the issue of whom they would prefer to live with or be governed by. </li></ul><ul><li>Would mean redrawing the map of Europe. </li></ul><ul><li>High ideal, not terribly practical. </li></ul>
  11. 13. The Sticky Areas <ul><li>Sudetan Germans in Czechoslovakia </li></ul><ul><li>1 Million Poles in Czechoslovakia </li></ul><ul><li>Germans in the Polish Corridor </li></ul><ul><li>50/50 make up of French and Germans in Alsace-Loraine </li></ul>

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