Agile Lean Scrum ITIL V2

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Integration of Agile/Lean, Scrum and ITIL

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Agile Lean Scrum ITIL V2

  1. 1. Scrum Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) & Agile/Lean and Scrum Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
  2. 2. Service Delivery A service is a means of delivering value to customers by facilitating outcomes customers want to achieve without the ownership of specific costs and risks Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 2
  3. 3. Delivering early and often, giving ourselves the best opportunity to beat the competition to market, realize revenue and discover insights that we can use to help us improve Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 3
  4. 4. Scrum Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 4
  5. 5. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 5
  6. 6. 1. Agile puts the Product Owner (aka “the business” or customer representative) in the driver’s seat – In the majority of the waterfall style projects the customer is involved, but in a limited capacity. They get to define a scope up-front, but then any changes they deem necessary are change ordered back to them. This practice assumes that the customer knows exactly what they want up front and penalizes them for changing their minds later in the development process. 2. Agile allows the business to quickly react to changing market conditions and needs – The only thing constant in today‟s economy is change. Businesses need to be able to make quick course corrections in order to survive. 3. Agile provides visibility into the development process – For many customers software development is a dark art. They don‟t have the background in order to understand the technical details and in most cases the development team prefers it this way. The customer is left feeling helpless and Agile engages them throughout the development lifecycle, providing enhanced visibility. 4. Agile also puts the Development Team in the driver’s seat - While the Product Owner is responsible for “what” is to be developed the Development Team is self-directing and self-organizing as to “how” to develop the system- software product Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 6
  7. 7. By delivering early and often we give ourselves the best opportunity to beat the competition to market, realize revenue and discover insights that we can use to help us improve Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 7
  8. 8. Scrum Explained “The… „relay race‟ approach to product development…may conflict with the goals of maximum speed and flexibility. Instead a holistic or ‘rugby’ approach—where a team tries to go the distance as a unit, passing the ball back and forth— may better serve today’s competitive requirements.”- Hirotaka Takeuchi and Ikujiro Nonaka, “The New New Product Development Game”, Harvard Business Review, January 1986 In Scrum you work in iterations delivering value-adding results incrementally Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 8
  9. 9. Scrum Framework Roles •Product owner •Team •Scrum Master Ceremonies •Sprint planning •Sprint review •Sprint retrospective •Daily scrum meeting Artifacts •Product backlog •Sprint backlog •Burndown charts Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 9
  10. 10. Think of Scrum as an Agile Framework Embodying Iterative and Incremental Product/Service Development Roles - Product Owner - Scrum Master - Daily Standup - Team - Showcase - Retrospective Pivot Dashboard Points Items Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 10
  11. 11. ITIL Framework Across the Service Lifecycle 11 Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 11
  12. 12. IT Solution/Service Delivery & Scrum Roadmap Strategy Business Need Improvement Design Requirements Definition Design Evaluation Optimization Develop Procurement Build & Test Operation Deployment Operation Retirement Transition Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 12
  13. 13. Some Agile/Lean/Scrum & ITIL Focus Points Service management using ITIL and Agile thinking for A and B. Process improvement with BTIO for C. Application development being Agile for D. Source: ITIL Service Strategy Book Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 13
  14. 14. Some Agile‟Lean/Scrum & ITIL Focus Points (continued from previous slide) Source: ITIL Service Strategy Book 14 Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 14
  15. 15. Some Agile/Lean/Scrum & ITIL Focus Points (continued from previous slide) Source: ITIL Service Transition Book 15 Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 15

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