5 Levels of Agile Planning Explained Simply

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5 Levels of Agile Planning Explained Simply

  1. 1. Delivering value early and often, giving ourselves the best opportunity to beat the competition to market, realize revenue and discover insights that we can use to help us improve 5 levels of Agile Planning
  2. 2. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 2
  3. 3. How to Organize a Children's Party If you are having difficulty viewing this video download QuickTime using this link: http://www.apple.com/quicktime/download/ Then install QuickTime and try the link again. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 3
  4. 4.  Chaotic Enterprise/Organization  Ordered Enterprise/Organization  Complex Enterprise/Organization Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 4
  5. 5. Roadmap to “being” agile • Delivery of commercial or operational value early and often, giving ourselves the best opportunity to beat the Agile competition to market, realize revenue and discover Coaching & insights that we can use to help us improve Training • Cross-functional, collaborative and adaptive teams developing and delivering value-added product (system- software) increments in a continuous flow from requirements to deployment Agile Scrum • Avoiding the high cost of discovering defects late in the Cultural Adoption Coaching & Renewal Training development cycle by discovering defects early in the development cycle which is accomplished by eliminating waste, increasing feedback loops and developing code from the point of view of provability and outside-in design Organizational • Emphasis is placed on the need for teams to nurture Change Management group cohesion, and paying attention to norms that serve as a guide that strengthens positive practices • Minimizing frustration levels and making the art and science of system-software development enjoyable and Delivering value early and not a burden or death march often, giving ourselves the best opportunity to beat the • The what, why, and how of agile/lean product (system- competition to market, software) development and delivery is not one persons realize revenue and vision alone; to become reality it needs to be a "shared" discover insights that we vision through negotiation and compromise between can use to help us improve individuals, the team and the organization 5
  6. 6. Four Spheres of Influence 1. Sphere 1 - Stakeholder Needs and Business Processes: This sphere denotes requirements (including quality attributes such as performance, security and reliability), end-user business processes, business drivers and operational environment. 2. Sphere 2 - Architecture and Design: This sphere denotes the essential elements of the system, the relationships between them, and how they fit with the enterprise system. The elements include structure, behavior, usage, functionality, performance, resilience, reuse, comprehensibility, economic and technologic constraints and tradeoffs. 3. Sphere 3 - Marketplace: This sphere denotes available and emerging technology and products, non- development items and relevant standards. 4. Sphere 4 - Program/Project Management: This sphere denotes the management aspects of the project. These aspects consider the cost, schedule and risk of building, fielding and supporting the solution. Key to these management aspects are the cost, schedule and risk of changing the necessary business processes. These four spheres are simultaneously defined and traded through the life of an agile and lean project because a decision in one sphere will inform and likely constrain the decisions that can be made in another sphere 6
  7. 7. 5 levels of Agile Planning What, Who, Why, When, Constraints, Product Vision Assumptions Releases – Date, Theme/Feature Set, Product Roadmap Objective, Development Approach Iteration, Team Capacity, Stories, Priority, Release Planning Size, Estimates, Definition of Done Stories – Tasks, Definition of Done Iteration Planning Level-of Effort, Commitment 1. What did I do yesterday? Daily Planning 2. What will I do today? 3. What is blocking me?
  8. 8. Gain Lower Accept feedback project risk change through through without iterative higher slowing incremental visibility down value delivery Delivering value early and often, giving ourselves the best opportunity to beat the competition to market, realize revenue and discover insights that we can use to help us improve 8
  9. 9. A Paradigm Shift Fixed Variable Source: www.dsdm.org How is Agile Planning Different from Traditional Approaches?
  10. 10. Product Vision What, Who, Why, When, Constraints, Assumptions Releases – Date, Theme/Feature Set, Product Roadmap Objective, Development Approach Iteration, Team Capacity, Stories, Priority, Release Planning Size, Estimates, Definition of Done Stories – Tasks, Definition of Done Iteration Planning Level-of Effort, Commitment 1. What did I do yesterday? Daily Planning 2. What will I do today? 3. What is blocking me?
  11. 11. Product Vision  What  Who (Stakeholders)  Why  When  Constraints & Assumptions “If you don't know where you are going, that's where you'll end up.” -Yogi Berra 11
  12. 12. Product Vision  What  Summary of the major benefits and features the product will provide  Gives context to the reader  Defines the business context for the product. In which domain is it going to function (for example, telecom or bank) and what market—who are the users? State whether the product is being developed to fulfill a contract or if it is a commercial product.  Who (Stakeholders)  There are a number of stakeholders with an interest in the development and not all of them are end users. Think of this as outside-in-design.  Customer/Consumer  Other vested interests  Provides the background and justification for why the requirements are needed Continued on Next Page 12
  13. 13. Continued from Previous Page Why Need and opportunity When  Begins the process of project scheduling by illuminating the stakeholders’ time expectations regarding the product. Also helps you dig into their expectations by defining the circumstances in which the new product would be used. Constraints & Assumptions  Express the constraints under which the project is undertaken. These constraints impact risk and cost. They could be things like external interfaces that the product must adhere to, standards, certifications or a technical approach employed for strategic reasons, such as using a certain database technology or distribution mechanisms.
  14. 14. What, Who, Why, When, Constraints, Product Vision Assumptions Releases – Date, Theme/Feature Set, Objective, Product Roadmap Development Approach Iteration, Team Capacity, Stories, Priority, Release Planning Size, Estimates, Definition of Done Stories – Tasks, Definition of Done Iteration Planning Level-of Effort, Commitment 1. What did I do yesterday? Daily Planning 2. What will I do today? 3. What is blocking me?
  15. 15. If you don't know where you are going, it's impossible to determine the best way to get there. A product roadmap is an essential tool for product planning and development. Product roadmaps outline when products are scheduled for release and include an overview of their primary and secondary features. 15
  16. 16. Tooling Life Cycle Reporting Life Cycle Planning/ Receiving/ Inventory Tool End of Procurement Sourcing Warehousing Management Utilization Life Tool received OEM or tooling Need for a TB submits SC will bin at PIT Tool utilized deems tool tool & quantity PR through or check out USA dock On aircraft unserviceable defined Sceptre For use SC receives and Tool shipped bins the tool Kit back to USA Process Steps TS sources TP generates PO Tool then & gets quote/ that transmits management checked in/out, PIT delivery date to OEM Tool Sup checks calibrated, shipped, for damage & Reported on calibration Tool repeatedly Tool Sup marks Repair tool BER, lost OEM confirms or other price & LT Tool Sup gives stores next steps Theme Tool changed OEM makes Stores stocks To inactive tool part or ships to another location Note: some of these = System Transaction Process steps may Tool held TS = Technical Sourcer vary at non-maintenance In case of TP = Technical Purchaser Tool arrives Future need Tool Sup = Tooling Supervisor at new station stations For it TB = Tooling BA LT = Lead Time USA = US Airways Tool received SC = Stock Clerk in Sceptre 16 BER = Beyond Economical Repair
  17. 17. The Product Backlog is Derived from the Product Vision and Roadmap © Scott Ambler, 2004 17
  18. 18. Copyright © 2005, Mountain Goat Software 1. Agile puts the Product Owner (aka “the business” or customer representative) in the driver’s seat – In the majority of the waterfall style projects the customer is involved, but in a limited capacity. They get to define a scope up-front, but then any changes they deem necessary are change ordered back to them. This practice assumes that the customer knows exactly what they want up front and penalizes them for changing their minds later in the development process. 2. Agile allows the business to quickly react to changing market conditions and needs – The only thing constant in today’s economy is change. Businesses need to be able to make quick course corrections in order to survive. 3. Agile provides visibility into the development process – For many customers software development is a dark art. They don’t have the background in order to understand the technical details and in most cases the development team prefers it this way. The customer is left feeling helpless and Agile engages them throughout the development lifecycle, providing enhanced visibility. 4. Agile also puts the Development Team in the driver’s seat - While the Product Owner is responsible for “what” is to be developed the Development Team is self-directing and self-organizing as to “how” to develop the system- software product Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 18
  19. 19. Tooling Project - Product Backlog 19
  20. 20. Where do Optional Stories come from Optional Optional Bus Strategy Use Cases Business Model System Requirements Customer Functional Business Partner & Non-Functional Product Owner Team Solution/IT-Services Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 20
  21. 21. Characteristics of good stories As a <who/user> I want <what/goal> so that <why/reason>  A good story is negotiable, testable, estimatable, commercially or operationally value-adding, cohesive and loosely-coupled  It is not an explicit contract for features or functionality; rather stories are short descriptions of functionality, the details of which are to be refined in a conversation between the Product Owner (aka, the business or customer) and the development team  The challenge comes in learning to include just enough detail to be able to prioritize and estimate the size of story and minimize ambiguity Story1 Story4 As an eligible user, I want to pay the As an eligible user, I want to access my Story11 onetime registration fee of $10, so record and delete any or all of my As an eligible user, I want to view a list that I can access my driver’s record in information to keep it current of assembled answers to questions the future asked most frequently of the DMV Story5 Story2 Story12 As an eligible user, I want to access my As an eligible user, I want to create a As an eligible user, I want to be able record and change any or all of my unique user name and password so find an address for my local DMV information to keep it current that my access is limited to my record office and print the results and to track activity and payment Story6 Story13 Story3 As an eligible user, I want multiple As the application, I want to maintain As an eligible user, I want to access my payment options to pay fees so that I an audit trail of changes for each record, so that I can verify that it is am able to access the features of the eligible user record indicating all edits correct DMV site that require payment Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 21
  22. 22. Acceptance Criteria  Acceptance criteria, represents the details for a story and specifies the desired behavior and functionality the system-software must implement  Acceptance criteria answer the question, “How will I know when I’m done with the story?”  Acceptance criterion is high level tests to verify and validate the completeness of a story or stories implemented during a Sprint/Iteration, expressed in a business domain language  These tests are created ideally through collaboration between business customers, business analysts, testers and developers; however the Product Owner (aka, the business or customer) is the primary owner of these conditions-of-satisfaction  Test cases and acceptance criteria are two different things  Test cases answer the questions, “How do I test and what are the test steps?” Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 22
  23. 23.  Depiction of the user interface or maybe even a report layout, is just as much a part of the details behind a story as acceptance criteria  Wireframes and screen mockups are often attached to stories as a basic visual guide used in interface design by the development team  Low fidelity diagrams depicting a candidate solution may also be attached to stories to visually communicate its design Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 23
  24. 24. What, Who, Why, When, Constraints, Product Vision Assumptions Releases – Date, Theme/Feature Set, Product Roadmap Objective, Development Approach Iteration, Team Capacity, Stories, Priority, Size, Release Planning Estimates, Definition of Done Stories – Tasks, Definition of Done Iteration Planning Level-of Effort, Commitment 1. What did I do yesterday? Daily Planning 2. What will I do today? 3. What is blocking me?
  25. 25. Product Vision Product Roadmap Iteration Plan Product Backlog Review and Adapt Develop Release Plan Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. Adapted from “Agile Project Management” Jim Highsmith Copyright 2004 25
  26. 26. The Release Plan The Release Plan is determined from the team’s velocity; initially this is an estimate, a best guess until the team’s actual velocity can be determined from historical data We create the Release plan from  The size estimate  The velocity (“size per iteration”) The Release plan shows what will be worked on in each iteration  Each iteration contains approximately the same number of story points and is time boxed by iteration length Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 26
  27. 27. Components of the Release Plan The Release Plan is comprised of: 1. The release theme 2. The release content 3. Business value statement for the release 4. The release timeline Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 27
  28. 28. Content 28
  29. 29. Creating the Release Plan (continue from previous slide) Once we have identified the theme and content for each release, we can prepare a brief summary of the Business Value to be delivered at each release Example: Release 1- This release implements ……. and allows users to ……………….. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 29
  30. 30. Release Timeline  Stories at the right level of detail  Prioritized stories  Sized stories  Deriving/estimating duration and cost to deliver product Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 30
  31. 31. Velocity is a measure of a Deriving estimates team’s rate of  4 iterations based progress per on team velocity Iteration  Each iteration 3 weeks long  12 weeks total duration  Estimated cost of $15,000 per iteration  Estimated total cost of $60,000 Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 31
  32. 32. Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 32
  33. 33. What, Who, Why, When, Constraints, Product Vision Assumptions Releases – Date, Theme/Feature Set, Product Roadmap Objective, Development Approach Iteration, Team Capacity, Stories, Priority, Release Planning Size, Estimates, Definition of Done Stories – Tasks, Definition of Done Level-of Effort, Iteration Planning Commitment 1. What did I do yesterday? Daily Planning 2. What will I do today? 3. What is blocking me?
  34. 34. 1. Selecting Stories from the Product Backlog based on the team’s velocity 2. Identifying the tasks to realize a selected Story 3. Estimating the level-of- effort required to complete the task Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 34
  35. 35. Working software & demo Unit test Code review Installer Tests Functional Performance Regression Documentation User docs/Online help Internal design docs Release notes API documents Copyright@2009 SolutionsIQ All rights Reserved 35 Copyright@ 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved.
  36. 36. What, Who, Why, When, Constraints, Product Vision Assumptions Releases – Date, Theme/Feature Set, Product Roadmap Objective, Development Approach Iteration, Team Capacity, Stories, Priority, Release Planning Size, Estimates, Definition of Done Stories – Tasks, Definition of Done Iteration Planning Level-of Effort, Commitment 1. What did I do yesterday? Daily Planning 2. What will I do today? 3. What is blocking me?
  37. 37. 1. Performing tasks to complete the story 2. Completing the story based on story acceptance criteria and team's definition of done 3. Developing and delivering commercial or operational value incrementally Copyright © 2008 Russell Pannone. All rights reserved. 37
  38. 38. Reduce Waste Feedback Loops • Remove what isn’t of • Sprint Review & Planning value to the customer • Sprint Retrospective • Quicker delivery of value • Daily Scrum & ROI 39

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