Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Exploring the great indoors: the built environment and human health (LabRoots Microbiology and Immunology 2016)

996 views

Published on

Webinar presented by Dr. Roxana Hickey (Postdoctoral Scholar, Biology and the Built Environment Center, University of Oregon) at the LabRoots Microbiology and Immunology Virtual Event held September 7-8, 2016

Published in: Science
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Exploring the great indoors: the built environment and human health (LabRoots Microbiology and Immunology 2016)

  1. 1. EXPLORING THE GREAT INDOORS The Built Environment & Human Health Roxana Hickey, Ph.D. University of Oregon September 7, 2016 @roxana_hickey
  2. 2. THE HUMAN MICROBIOME 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 2
  3. 3. THE HUMAN BODY IS TEEMING WITH BACTERIA, FUNGI, VIRUSES AND OTHER MICROBES ~39 TRILLION MICROBIAL CELLS: ~1-3% OF TOTAL BODY MASS MOST FUNCTIONS OF HUMAN- ASSOCIATED MICROBES STILL UNKNOWN 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 3 Illustration: Charis Tsevis (flickr)
  4. 4. The microbiome & health •  Nutrition •  Protection against pathogens •  Allergies and immunity •  Disease and cancer •  Cognitive and mental health Image: Charis Tsevis (flickr) 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 4
  5. 5. MICROBES ALL AROUND US 9/7/16 5 © University of Oregon BioBE Center
  6. 6. 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 6 HUMANS SPEND UP TO 90% OF THEIR LIVES INDOORS Photo: www.pexels.com
  7. 7. MICROBIOLOGY EVOLUTIONARY ECOLOGY ARCHITECTURE BUILDING SCIENCE MECHANICAL ENGINEERING BIOLOGY & THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT CENTER 9/7/16 7 © University of Oregon BioBE Center
  8. 8. MICROBIOLOGY EVOLUTIONARY ECOLOGY ARCHITECTURE BUILDING SCIENCE MECHANICAL ENGINEERING BIOLOGY & THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT CENTER 9/7/16 8 © University of Oregon BioBE Center Dr. Jessica Green University of Oregon Dr. Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg University of Oregon GZ Charlie Brown University of Oregon
  9. 9. MICROBIOLOGY EVOLUTIONARY ECOLOGY ARCHITECTURE BUILDING SCIENCE MECHANICAL ENGINEERING BIOLOGY & THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT CENTER 9/7/16 9 © University of Oregon BioBE Center GOAL: OPTIMIZE THE DESIGN & OPERATION OF BUILDINGS TO PROMOTE HUMAN HEALTH & ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY
  10. 10. 9/7/16 10 © University of Oregon BioBE Center Illustration: Cameron Slayden (Cosmocyte) & BioBE
  11. 11. 9/7/16 11 © University of Oregon BioBE Center Illustration: Cameron Slayden (Cosmocyte) & BioBE HUMAN HEALTH BUILDING DESIGN & ENERGY MICROBIAL ECOLOGY
  12. 12. 9/7/16 12 © University of Oregon BioBE Center Illustration: Cameron Slayden (Cosmocyte) & BioBE HOW DOES THE DESIGN, USE, AND OCCUPANCY OF BUILDINGS INFLUENCE THE INDOOR MICROBIOME?
  13. 13. 9/7/16 13 © University of Oregon BioBE Center HOW DOES THE DESIGN, USE, AND OCCUPANCY OF BUILDINGS INFLUENCE THE INDOOR MICROBIOME? DESIGN Ventilation source in hospital rooms Kembel et al. ISME 2012 Architectural design of a university building Kembel et al. PLOS One 2014; Meadow et al. Indoor Air 2013 USE Human interaction with classroom surfaces Meadow et al. Microbiome 2014 Antimicrobials and resistance Hartmann et al. Environmental Science & Technology, in press OCCUPANCY Human microbial cloud Meadow et al. PeerJ 2015
  14. 14. MEASURING MICROBES 9/7/16 14 © University of Oregon BioBE Center
  15. 15. 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 15 MICROBES CAN’T BE EASILY DIFFERENTIATED BY EYE Photo: Scimat via GeVy Images
  16. 16. LESS THAN 1% OF MICROBIAL LIFE CAN BE CULTIVATED IN A PETRI DISH 9/7/16 16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center Photo: Tasha Sturm, Cabrillo College
  17. 17. Hug et al. Nature Microbiology (2016) 9/7/16 17 © University of Oregon BioBE Center
  18. 18. Cultivation-independent workflow 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 18 Environmental sample Extract and purify DNA Amplify marker gene (16S rRNA) Generate DNA sequences Perform bioinformatic analyses
  19. 19. ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN INFLUENCES THE MICROBIOME OF THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 19
  20. 20. 9/7/16 20 © University of Oregon BioBE Center HOW DOES VENTILATION SOURCE INFLUENCE THE AIR MICROBIOME IN HOSPITAL ROOMS? Dr. Steven Kembel University of Quebec
  21. 21. 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 21 PROVIDENCE MILWAUKIE HOSPITAL PORTLAND, OR
  22. 22. 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 22 ! WINDOW VENTILATION MECHANICAL VENTILATION OUTDOOR AIR
  23. 23. 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 23 WINDOW VENTILATION MECHANICAL VENTILATION
  24. 24. 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 24 OUTDOOR AIR
  25. 25. Diversity varies with air source 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 25 Kembel et al. ISME (2012)
  26. 26. Less diverse communities had a higher proportion of taxa closely related to human pathogens 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 26 WINDOW MECHANICAL OUTDOOR Kembel et al. ISME (2012)
  27. 27. 9/7/16 27 © University of Oregon BioBE Center
  28. 28. 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 28 Dr. Steven Kembel University of Quebec Dr. James Meadow Phylagen WHAT FACTORS DRIVE MICROBIOME COMPOSITION AT THE BUILDING SCALE?
  29. 29. Restrooms! Offices! Classrooms!9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 29 LILLIS BUSINESS COMPLEX UNIVERSITY OF OREGON, EUGENE, OR
  30. 30. Room (short-term scale) sampling: air, surfaces 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 30
  31. 31. Building (long-term scale) sampling: vacuum dust 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 31
  32. 32. 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 32 High human traffic Low human traffic Data from Kembel et al., PLOS One (2014) Dust microbiome varies with space and environment
  33. 33. Mechanical vs. window ventilation 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 33 North side: Window supply South side: Mechanical supply Kembel et al., PLOS One (2014) CAP 1 NMDS1 Deinococcus Achromonobacter Spiroplasma Roseomonas Rhabdochlamydia Lysobacter Lysinibaccillus Pigmentiphaga Acidisphaera Brenneria Methylobacterium Sphingomonas Streptococcus Rhizobium Mycoplana Agrobacterium Brevundimonas mechanical window p=0.005 constrained inertia=2.5% a 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 Deinococcusrelativeabundance air supply mechanical window p<0.001 b 0.02 0.04 0.06 0.08 0.10 0.12 0.14 Methylobacteriumrelativeabundance air supply mechanical win p<0.001 c
  34. 34. 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 34
  35. 35. 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 35 Spatially connected rooms are more similar to each other 2 4 6 8 10 12 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 BiologicalSimilarity (1-Canberradistance) How many doors between offices? Kembel et al., PLOS One (2014)
  36. 36. 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 36
  37. 37. HUMAN INTERACTIONS WITH THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT ALTER THE INDOOR MICROBIOME 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 37
  38. 38. 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 38 HOW DO HUMAN INTERACTIONS WITH VARIOUS SURFACES SHAPE THE COMPOSITION OF THE INDOOR MICROBIOME? Dr. James Meadow Phylagen
  39. 39. Sampling classroom surfaces 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 39 FLOORCHAIR WALLDESK Meadow et al., Microbiome (2014)
  40. 40. Microbiome varies by surfaces with differential human contact 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 40 FLOORCHAIR WALLDESK Meadow et al., Microbiome (2014) -1.0 -0.5 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 -1.0 -0.5 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 CAP1 CAP2 Chairs Desks Walls Floors a -40 -20 0 20 40 60 -40 -20 0 20 40 60 CAP1 CAP2 Lactobacillus Lactobacillus Corynebacterium Lactobacillus Staphylococcus Staphylococcus Corynebacterium Corynebacterium Phytoplasma Streptococcus Streptococcus Streptococcus Brevundimonas Sphingomonas Alicyclobacillus Alicyclobacillus Rhodopseudomonas Salmonella Chroococcidiopsis Salmonella Roseomonas b
  41. 41. 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 41 WHAT IS THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ANTIMICROBIAL CHEMICALS & ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE IN THE INDOOR MICROBIOME? Dr. Erica Hartmann Northwestern University
  42. 42. Sanitizing the built environment 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 42
  43. 43. Triclosan is ubiquitous in dust Location n Detection (%) Median Conc. (ng/g) Reference China 47 96 570 Lu, X. et al. Analytical Methods 5, 5339 (2013) Canada 63 100 571 Fan, X. et al. J. Environ. Monit. 12, 1891-1897 (2010) Belgium 18 100 220 Geens, T. et al. Chemosphere 76, 755-760 (2009) Spain 10 100 702 Canosa, P. et al. Anal. Chem. 79, 1675-1681 (2007) 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 43
  44. 44. Sampling dust in a mixed-use university campus building 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 44
  45. 45. Description R p 23S ribosomal RNA methyltransferase 0.80 0.001 23S ribosomal RNA methyltransferase 0.77 0.006 class A beta-lactamase 0.73 0.005 Hartmann et al., in review Antimicrobial resistance in dust Hartmann et al., Env Sci & Tech (in press) 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 45
  46. 46. Antibiotic resistance varies across environments 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 46 Hartmann et al., Env Sci & Tech (in press)
  47. 47. 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 47 hVp://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm378393.htm
  48. 48. HUMANS SHED A PERSONALIZED ‘MICROBIAL CLOUD’ INDOORS 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 48
  49. 49. 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 49 HOW DO INDIVIDUALS’ MICROBIOMES COLONIZE THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT? Dr. James Meadow Phylagen
  50. 50. Occupied Unoccupied 2.4 m 3.7m 2.9m 9/7/16 50 © University of Oregon BioBE Center Meadow et al., PeerJ (2015) CLIMATE CHAMBER @ ENERGY STUDIES IN BUILDINGS LAB, PORTLAND, OR
  51. 51. Meadow et al., Peer J 2015 An occupied space has a distinct microbiome from an adjacent unoccupied space 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 51 Meadow et al., PeerJ (2015)
  52. 52. 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 52 Spaces occupied by different people display unique microbial patterns Meadow et al., PeerJ (2015)
  53. 53. h(p://www.sciencefriday.com/ videos/your-very-special- microbial-cloud/ 9/7/16 53 © University of Oregon BioBE Center
  54. 54. 9/7/16 54 © University of Oregon BioBE Center Illustration: Cameron Slayden (Cosmocyte) & BioBE HOW DOES THE DESIGN, USE, AND OCCUPANCY OF BUILDINGS INFLUENCE THE INDOOR MICROBIOME AND HUMAN HEALTH?
  55. 55. 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 55
  56. 56. Interactions between humans & the built environment 56 CLOUDS IN A CROWD: DISPERSAL OF THE HUMAN MICROBIAL CLOUD COLONIZATION OF THE SKIN MICROBIOME VIA THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT EFFECTS OF WEATHERIZATION ON THE HOME MICROBIOME 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center
  57. 57. 57 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center
  58. 58. Interactions between humans & the built environment 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 58 CLOUDS IN A CROWD: DISPERSAL OF THE HUMAN MICROBIAL CLOUD COLONIZATION OF THE HUMAN (SKIN) MICROBIOME VIA THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT EFFECTS OF WEATHERIZATION ON THE HOME MICROBIOME
  59. 59. 59 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center
  60. 60. Interactions between humans & the built environment 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 60 CLOUDS IN A CROWD: DISPERSAL OF THE HUMAN MICROBIAL CLOUD COLONIZATION OF THE HUMAN (SKIN) MICROBIOME VIA THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT EFFECTS OF WEATHERIZATION ON THE HOME MICROBIOME
  61. 61. SURFACE DIRECT CONTACT SURFACE INTERMEDIATE BIOAEROSOL INTERMEDIATE 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 61
  62. 62. 62 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center
  63. 63. 9/7/16 63 © University of Oregon BioBE Center HUMAN HEALTH BUILDING DESIGN & ENERGY MICROBIAL ECOLOGY
  64. 64. 9/7/16 64 © University of Oregon BioBE Center ARE THERE ‘GENERAL LAWS’ IN BUILDING ECOLOGY? HOW ARE THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND HUMAN HEALTH RELATED? HOW ARE MICROBES EXCHANGED AMONG BUILDINGS, AIR & PEOPLE?
  65. 65. Acknowledgements 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 65 Jessica Green Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg G.Z. Brown Curtis HuVenhower (Harvard) Rolf Halden (Arizona State) Jeff Kline Alejandro Manzo James Meadow Gwynne Mhuireach Dale NorthcuV Maria Sarao Andy Siemens Kyla Siemens Jason Stenson Hannah Wilson Adam Altrichter Ashley Bateman Clarisse Betancourt Brendan Bohannan Ashkaan Fahimipour Mark Frej Erica Hartmann Deb Johnson-Shelton Steven Kembel Ann Klein
  66. 66. For more information •  Biology and the Built Environment Center – hVp://biobe.uoregon.edu •  Roxana Hickey, Postdoctoral Fellow – rhickey@uoregon.edu, @roxana_hickey •  Jessica Green, BioBE Co-Director – jlgreen@uoregon.edu, @JessicaLeeGreen •  Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg, Co-Director – kevinvdw@uoregon.edu, @Wymelenberg 9/7/16 © University of Oregon BioBE Center 66

×