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Quackery traditional medicine tivoli

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Quackery traditional medicine tivoli

  1. 1. Quackery and Traditional Medicine
  2. 2. What Is Wrong With This Picture?
  3. 3. <ul><li>This Transgender Fake Doctor Conned Woman To Pay Her To Pump Some Junk In Her Trunk </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>A ‘fake doctor’ suspected of injecting a woman’s bottom with cement, super glue and tire sealant to give her a more ‘shapely’ rear has been arrested. </li></ul>
  5. 6. <ul><li>Transgendered woman Oneal Ron Morris, who by his own picture appears to have undergone the ‘butt-boosting’ procedure himself, is accused of administering the potentially lethal shots to at least one victim. </li></ul><ul><li>The 30-year-old, who police say is a man but appears to look like a woman, was detained in Florida yesterday for the alleged incident in May 2010. </li></ul>
  6. 7. <ul><li>$700 is a lot of money to pay someone to practically kill you. Why on earth would anyone pay this kind of money to take a risk with someone unlicensed? It can’t possibly cost that much more to go to a real doctor’s office and get knifed up by a licensed professional. </li></ul>
  7. 8. <ul><li>Quackery  is a derogatory term used to describe the promotion [1]  of unproven or fraudulent  describes a &quot; quack &quot; as a &quot;fraudulent or ignorant pretender to medical skill&quot; or &quot;a person who pretends, professionally or publicly, to have skill ,  knowledge , or  qualifications  he or she does not possess; a  charlatan .&quot; [2] </li></ul>Quackery
  8. 10. The word &quot;quack&quot; derives from the archaic word &quot;quacksalver,&quot; of  Dutch  origin (spelled  kwakzalver  in contemporary Dutch), literally meaning &quot;hawker of salve &quot;. [3]  In the Middle Ages the word quack meant &quot;shouting&quot;. The quacksalvers sold their wares on the market shouting in a loud voice. [4]
  9. 11. ALBULARYO  MANGHIHILOT  MAGPAPAANAK (MIDWIVES) MANGLULUOP MANGHIHILA MANGTATAWAS   MEDIKO  FAITH HEALERS
  10. 12. ALBULARYO the hierarchy of healers and specialists in Philippine folk medicine, the  albularyo may be referred to as the &quot;general practitioner,&quot; knowledgeable in most of the folkloric modalities, usually especially versed in the use of medicinal herbs.
  11. 14. HILOT The hilot  ambiguously refers both to the  manghihilot  and  magpapaanak .   The manghihilot specializes in techniques and treatments applicable to sprains, fractures and muskuloskeletal conditions.
  12. 15. MAGPAPANAK   The Magpapaanak The magpapaanak are more popularly referred to as &quot;hilot,&quot; a designation confusingly shared with the 'chiropractic' manghihilot. Not uncommonly, the calling comes from a family-line of hilots, and the training usually gotten from a trained practitioner who was a relative, friend or neighbor. Some become a &quot;hilot&quot; because of a spiritual calling, or a message from a supernatural being that grants the hilot the needed power and skills.
  13. 16. MAGPAPANAK   The magpapaanak has more than a basic knowledge in herbal medicinal plants, utilizing them in a variety of prenatal needs and postnatal care (See:  Suob ). Prenatal care starts about the fifth month, the patient followed up every two weeks or as often as needed to assess the progress and fetal position. Any perceived problem is referred early on. Although the midwives are required to be certified and register annually at the municipal hall, there is no strict enforcement of certification. Quite often, in impoverished communities, deliveries are performed by friends, neighbors or relatives who have gained experience, confidence and the basic expertise in umbilical cord care, albeit uncertified. Too, they often have the basic knowledge on postpartum care and massage, and the use of medicinal herbs for the ritual of suob. For a sundry of signs by the infant, like unusual amount of crying or restlessness, not uncommonly attributed to unpleasant entities and spirits.the midwife might take on the task of &quot;pagbubuhos,&quot; a pre-baptismal ritual of water application or immersion performed on some infants while awaiting the sacramental church ritual.
  14. 17. MAGPAPANAK   The Magpapaanak The magpapaanak are more popularly referred to as &quot;hilot,&quot; a designation confusingly shared with the 'chiropractic' manghihilot. Not uncommonly, the calling comes from a family-line of hilots, and the training usually gotten from a trained practitioner who was a relative, friend or neighbor. Some become a &quot;hilot&quot; because of a spiritual calling, or a message from a supernatural being that grants the hilot the needed power and skills. The magpapaanak has more than a basic knowledge in herbal medicinal plants, utilizing them in a variety of prenatal needs and postnatal care (See:  Suob ). Prenatal care starts about the fifth month, the patient followed up every two weeks or as often as needed to assess the progress and fetal position. Any perceived problem is referred early on. Although the midwives are required to be certified and register annually at the municipal hall, there is no strict enforcement of certification. Quite often, in impoverished communities, deliveries are performed by friends, neighbors or relatives who have gained experience, confidence and the basic expertise in umbilical cord care, albeit uncertified. Too, they often have the basic knowledge on postpartum care and massage, and the use of medicinal herbs for the ritual of suob. For a sundry of signs by the infant, like unusual amount of crying or restlessness, not uncommonly attributed to unpleasant entities and spirits.the midwife might take on the task of &quot;pagbubuhos,&quot; a pre-baptismal ritual of water application or immersion performed on some infants while awaiting the sacramental church ritual.
  15. 18. Thanks for listening  Mrs. Rowena M. Tivoli

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