A simple formula for becoming Lean, Agile and unlocking high performance teams

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An extended version of the session at the Sydney Scrum User Group, Agile Brisbane, Melbourne Agile and Scrum User Group and Agile Newcastle between Feb 26 and Mar 20, 2013. This included a promo about the Scrum Australia 2013 conference: http://www.scrum.com.au

Session Intro

In an effort to become Agile and/or Lean, many organisations in Australia are attempting to design their own custom Agile process from Agile and Lean principles at the time at which they are least qualified to do so - before they have started.

This might appear to make sense if you set out to 'implement the Agile Methodology' * or 'do Agile' *. After all, aren't you acting in the adaptable spirit of Agile to pick and choose which practices you adopt and how you implement them? Every organisation is unique, right?

In reality, organisations taking this approach, tend to pick the easy 'low hanging fruit' that are easy for them to adopt over those that offer the most improvement over the status quo. In pulling up stumps early and 'wimping out' of the harder organisational changes, such organisations unconsciously stifle their teams' ability to reach for high performance and limit the organisation's ability to go beyond "good" to be truly "great". They may also be missing the essential understanding that Agile practices were designed to work as an inter-dependent system of disciplined practice. As Kent Beck put it: "No single practice works well by itself, each needs the other practices to keep them in balance. If you follow 80% of the process you get 20% of the benefits."

If, however, you set out to be a high performing organisation, this may not be adequate.


So...

What if there was a way to avoid a half-baked 'Agile-ish' approach producing half-baked outcomes? What if you could get there by "standing on the shoulders of giants"?

What if there were a simple formula for becoming truly Agile?

(Genuinely living the Agile Software Development values and principles.)

What if this simple formula also implicitly implemented the core principles of Lean and did so in a way based not on repetitive Lean Manufacturing of physical objects but on a type of Lean that is much more appropriate for complex knowledge work and systems development?

What if this formula also implemented the management/leadership approaches suggested for a Complex problem domain as per the Cynefin framework?

What if this formula enabled rapid cycles of learning about both:- what the customer really needs and- what techniques are required to rise to the challenge of delivering it using contemporary technologies?

What if this formula was proven to scale and could support you through the Agile Journey from pilot to whole-organisation transformation?

What if this formula was self-correcting in terms of both your project outcome and your processes themselves?

What if there was a way to unlock the full synergistic potential of teams and realise truly high performance?

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A simple formula for becoming Lean, Agile and unlocking high performance teams

  1. 1. A simple formula for becoming Lean, Agile and unlocking high performance teams Rowan Bunning, CST @rowanb scrumwithstyle.comPlease do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  2. 2. Rowan Bunning• Background in object oriented & web dev. with vendors, start-ups & consultancies• Introduced to Agile practices over 10 years ago as: “the way good Smalltalkers develop software”• Pioneer of Scrum in Australia• Worked as an Agile Coach / ScrumMaster at a leading Agile consultancy in the U.K. (Conchango)• Agile Coach in Australia• I also help with training including... • Certified ScrumMaster • Certified Scrum Product Owner • Effective User Stories • Agile Estimating and Planning • Agile for Teams Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  3. 3. Session Outline 1. How conferences changed my life 2. A simple formula (very, very quick intro to Scrum) 3. Lean knobs (how you can implement Lean using Scrum) 4. ‘Half-baked’ Agile and what you can do about it 5. Ingredients in the formula (particularly interesting to the academically inclined)Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  4. 4. How conferences changed my life A personal journeyPlease do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  5. 5. Conferences that changed my career Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  6. 6. Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  7. 7. Organisers of Scrum Australia 2013 Rowan Bunning Ilan Goldstein Martin Kearns Colin Tan CST, Agile Coach: CST, Author Agile UX: AxisAgile National Capability Scrum WithStyle Lead at SMS MT Stuart Bargon Dave Bales Agile Coach ex-Atlassian CSC, Agile Coach Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  8. 8. A couple of the International SpeakersPlease do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  9. 9. • In-depth Seminars - for all adoption levels from the swimming pool to the open ocean• Experience Reports - real implementation experiences from a ‘sage of the waves’• Hands-on Workshops - learn by doing• Scrum Clinic – one-on-one coaching with some of Australia’s most experienced Scrum Coaches• Open Space – every topic you want will be in the programme because in Open Space, you put it there!• Extensive Networking Opportunities - connect with the thriving regional Scrum community scrum.com.au Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  10. 10. A Simple Formula Simple doesn’t mean it’s easy though!Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  11. 11. Simple Scrum Flow Daily Scrum 2 Day 1 Product Backlog Sprint Planning Sprint 4 Sprint 3 Potentially Shippable Retrospective Product Increment Sprint ReviewPlease do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  12. 12. Scrum: a simple formula Roles Artefacts Activities1. Product Owner 4. Product Increment 9. Backlog Refinement2. Team 5. Product Backlog 10.Sprint Planning3. ScrumMaster 6. Sprint Backlog 11. Daily Scrum 12.Sprint Review 7. Visible Progress 13.Sprint Retrospective 8. Done 14.DevelopmentPrinciples Iterative Incremental Time-boxing Empirical Self-organisation Values Openness Focus Commitment Respect Courage Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com See: agileatlas.org
  13. 13. Usage of Agile methods “overall Agile adoption now approaches 45%, up from 39% in 2010”81.5% Scrum 100 7558.5% Iterative 5044.4% Waterfall 25 201037.1% Kanban 0 Agile 2011 Non-Agile35.6% eXtreme Programming (XP)32.7% Lean References: Forrester Research, "Rightsource Your Agile-Lean Ecosystem" by Diego lo Giudice, September 4, 2012. Forrester Research, "Survey Results: How Agile Is Your Organization?" by Diego lo Giudice, November 2011.Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  14. 14. Lean Knobs Being Lean by turning the knobs in Scrum 0 11Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  15. 15. eXtreme Programming was about turning it up to 10 When I first articulated XP, I had the mental image of knobs on a control board. Each knob was a practice that from experience I knew worked well. I would turn all the knobs up to 10 and see what happened. I was a little surprised to find that the whole package of practices was stable, predictable, and flexible. - Kent BeckPlease do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  16. 16. Can we take it to 11? See Spinal Tap video at:youtube.com/watch?v=EbVKWCpNFhY
  17. 17. Rowan’s toy...
  18. 18. Lean Software Development thought leaders on Scrum “Scrum is a fine example of a Lean environment. Scrum is a set of practices; this is how you do things. Lean would be the principles behind those practices. Lean is the general principles that encourage you to use something like Scrum.” - Interview with Mary and Tom Poppendieck on using Lean for Competitive Advantage, InfoQ, 2007: http://www.infoq.com/interviews/poppendieck-lean-2007Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  19. 19. Lean Knobs we’ll look at • Plan Do Check Act - The PDCA cycle • Batch Size (multiple levels) • Limit WIP (multiple levels) • Managing Queues • Pull (multiple levels) • Seeing Waste • Eliminating Waste • Amplifying LearningPlease do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  20. 20. The PDCA Cycle in Scrum Daily Work - Execute.... learning by Sprint Planning Do-ing! - Plan the new cycle Daily Scrum 2 Day 1 Product Backlog Sprint Planning Sprint 4 Sprint 3 Potentially Shippable Retrospective Product Increment Sprint Sprint Review Review - Check Product Increment against latest understanding of the customer Sprint Retrospective need and the right product - Act on what was learned to improve future cyclesPlease do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  21. 21. Batch size at release level 0 11 Release Size Go Live #1 Go Live #2 Go/No Go? Go/No Go? Go/No Go? Go/No Go? Envisioning + Release Planning Sprint 1 Sprint 2 Sprint 3 Sprint 4 Sprint 5 Sprint 6 Cycle time of Requirement to releasable softwarePlease do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  22. 22. Batch Sizing knob for Interaction & Adaptation Sprint N Sprint N+1 Sprint work How long to create a Product Increment of sufficient value for meaningful feedback from stakeholders? 0 11 Sprint LengthPlease do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  23. 23. Limit WIP “Do your job. Focus all of your efforts and skills on doing the work that you’ve committed to doing. Don’t worry about anything else.” Stop starting, 0 11 Focus start finishing!Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  24. 24. Limit WIP within Sprints by ‘Swarming’ Not Started WIP Completed PBI 1 Sprint PBI 2 WIP PBI 3 PBI 4 0 11 PBI 5Degree of Swarming PBI 6Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  25. 25. Manage Queue Size by onlydisaggregating the tip of the iceberg Pull Items into Sprints Ready items The ‘Waterline’ The current Release © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  26. 26. Pull Backlog into stable Teams Push 0 11 Degree to whichPortfolio Management ‘Resources’ uses Pull scheduling Project Rather than seeking ‘resources’ to fit the work ...construct pipelines of value to be pulled into stable teams based on current capacity Pull Portfolio Product Backlog Team Source: Serge Beaumont, Practical tools for the Product Owner: Focus, Value, Flow, Munich Scrum Gathering October 2009. Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  27. 27. Pulling from the Sprint Backlog Product WIPBacklog Item Not Started Completed Task A Task BAs a user, I... 0h 0h 3 Task D Task E Now C Task thatAs a user, I... 4h 4h 0h 8 I have capacity, what’s the Task F Task G next most urgent task that I 6h 4h can PULL across? Task H 6hMigrate... Task I Task L 8h 4h 0 11 5 Task K Task L Inclination of team 4h 4h members to Pull tasks and use all of their skills to level work to capacity Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  28. 28. Seeing the Biggest Waste in Software Always or often used 20% 13% 16% 0 11 7% Degree to which Sprint Reviews are used 19% effectively with the right people giving the Features in software systems right feedback and the Product Owner taking the right Backlog 45% adjustment action Always Seldom or Often Sometimes never used 64% Seldom Never Reference: CHAOS Report, Standish Group.Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  29. 29. Eliminate waste Release Burndown Sprint Importance: What is the benefit? 11 0 Urgency: What is the Cost of Delay? Focus on Backlog Backlog Ordering ordering by Value “Do it sooner” Feedback “Do it later” “Drop it”Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  30. 30. Exchanging items to increase value To add a new item... ...drop an item of equal or Value greater effort. Time Source: Serge Beaumont, Practical tools for the Product Owner: Focus, Value, Flow, Munich Scrum Gathering October 2009. Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  31. 31. Amplify Learning 0 11 Pairing and Sharing Photo: CalquiPlease do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  32. 32. Complex The applicability of a givenPattern-based leadership management approach is Probe, sense, respond bounded Set boundaries Create environments and Fact-based management experiments that allow patterns to emerge Sense, analyse, respond Increase levels of interaction Create panels of experts and communication Use methods that can help Listen to conflicting generate ideas advice Stimulate attractors Complicated Monitor for emergence Encourage dissent Chaotic Thanks to: Dave Snowden cognitive-edge.com Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  33. 33. Scrum knobs for complexityComplexity approach Scrum KnobsManaging starting conditions Vision, Agile team formationProbe, sense, respond Apply, Inspect, Adapt*Set containing boundaries Sprints, team, committed work...Safe-fail environments Timeboxing and iteration...Experiments, pattern emergence Self-organisation, retro. actionsIncrease levels of interaction and Colocation, collaboration...communicationGenerate ideas Ideation, collaborative design...Open up discussions Well facilitated workshops...Use distributed cognition Self-organisationStimulate attractors ScrumMaster interventions...Encourage dissent and diversity Cross-functional teams...Monitor for emergence ScrumMaster activity, retros... Thanks to: Joseph Pelrine.Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  34. 34. Take-away: From a practitioner’s point of view... Lean is a set of thinking tools to better understand how to get the most out of Agile application frameworks such as Scrum.Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  35. 35. A previous session... London, 2007 Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  36. 36. The taste of half-baked Agile Fragile Cargo cult Agile Scrummerfall Waterscrum Scrumbut(t) RUP-tured ScrumPlease do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  37. 37. Beware ‘cargo cult’ Agile The term “cargo cult” is used as an English language idiom for referring to any group of people who imitate the superficial exterior of a process or system without having any understanding of the underlying substance. Reference: http://theresilientearth.com/?q=content/cargo-cult-climate-sciencePlease do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  38. 38. It’s not just about going faster... When the authors of the Agile Manifesto began talking about what was important to each of us, way back in 2001, we clearly agreed on two broad goals: improving software development performance (striving for software excellence) and creating exciting, collaborative, fun work environments. The latter - better working environments - was just as important as the former, but in the intervening years it often became sidetracked... - Jim Highsmith in his forward to The Human Side of Agile by Gil BrozaPlease do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  39. 39. Losing the definition of ‘Agile’ “Semantic diffusion occurs when you have a word that is coined a person or group, often with a pretty good definition, but then gets spread through the wider community in a way that weakens that definition. This weakening risks losing the definition entirely - and with it any usefulness to the term. I see this semantic diffusion happening very publicly to two terms at the moment: agile and Web2.0. ...both of these face a lot of corruption in the field. Ive run into people who think agile methods mean you shouldnt do any planning ” - Martin Fowler Reference: http://martinfowler.com/bliki/SemanticDiffusion.htmlPlease do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  40. 40. “Agile” and Agile methodsBe... “Agile Software Development” is an umbrella term defined by... Values & PrinciplesDo 1...n Scrum eXtreme Programming Agile methods* Feature Driven Dynamic Systems Development Development Method Adaptive Crystal ...to be agile Time-boxing VisualUse n...N Continuous User Stories Management Integration Daily Scrums Practices Test Driven Development Reviews Acceptance Test Driven Development etc... * the key ones represented at the Agile Manifesto gathering in Feb 2001. Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  41. 41. Agile is an Abstraction over more concrete frameworks What happens when you try to instantiate an abstract class?Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  42. 42. A few things to keep in mind...• There is no such thing as “the Agile Methodology”... which one?• You cannot “do Agile”... see: tinyurl.com/nodoagile (unless the term is being overloaded to mean someone’s custom/proprietary method that is being called ‘Agile’).• You can however, do an Agile method and Agile practices as a means of living the Agile values, following the principles and creating an Agile culture. Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  43. 43. Multiple-choice Question Does Scrum have rules, or just guidelines? A) Scrum has a few rules. B) Scrum has guidelines, not rules. Thanks to: Michael JamesPlease do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  44. 44. “What rules? I thought Agile meant there were no rules!” Framework rules define the environment in which process details emergePlease do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  45. 45. Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  46. 46. Building a competency is a gradual process Shu internalise and abide by all the rules Ha self-reflect to find alternatives to the rules Ri transcend the rules Reference: http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?ShuHaRiPlease do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  47. 47. XP Practices are Interdependent “No single practice works well by itself, each needs the other practices to keep them in balance.” “If you follow 80% of the process you get 20% of the benefits.” - Kent BeckPlease do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  48. 48. Scrum is a mirror Quoted from: Alistair Cockburn.Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  49. 49. Scrum exposes issues to be fixed“Scrum is a very simple framework within which the‘game’ of complex product development is played.Scrum exposes every inadequacy or dysfunctionwithin an organisation’s product and systemdevelopment practices. The intention of Scrum is tomake them transparent so the organisation can fixthem. Unfortunately, many organisations changeScrum to accommodate the inadequacies ordysfunctions instead of solving them.” - Ken Schwaber“The mistake we made was to change Scrum to fit ourcurrent environment, rather than use Scrum to improveour current environment.” - a recent client Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  50. 50. “Scrum is like chess. You either play it as its rules state, or you don’t. Scrum and chess do not fail or succeed. They are either played, or not.” - Ken SchwaberPlease do not redistribute without the author’s permission.
  51. 51. Beware the Pit! High Performance Agile Teams and Transformed Organisation High Capability “Let’s get rid of our old “This isn’t really working so well...” approach and just do the bits of Agile that suit us!” Traditional Predictive No fully functional Project Management system of Agile has been disbanded management and delivery has been Neither robust achievedTraditional Predictive Waterfall Process Nor resilient Worst of both worlds The Pit of Dysfunction Low Capability Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  52. 52. "It seems today that some ‘Agile’ teams are practicing nothing more than ‘air guitar and attitude’ (to quote Alan Kay)." - Joseph Pelrine, On Understanding Software Agility - A Social Complexity Point of ViewPlease do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  53. 53. Don’t just play air guitar, pick up a real instrument... it’s infinitely more rewarding!And now, just for some light entertainment... an Air Guitar video: youtube.com/watch?v=q_3oaTH1PII
  54. 54. Things you can do about half-baked Agile... 1. Get someone in to talk to your leadership team 2. Become a change agent / ScrumMaster Manns, M. L. and Rising, L. Fearless Change: Patterns for Introducing New Ideas. Addison-Wesley, 2004. Cohn, M. Succeeding with Agile: Software Development Using Scrum. Addison-Wesley Professional, 2009. 3. Do ScrumMaster or advanced Agile Leadership training 4. Get an external Agile Coach in 5. Connect with people at other organisations who have overcome similar issues... at Meetups... perhaps at a conference... Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  55. 55. Ingredients in the formula Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  56. 56. Multiple-choice Question Today, and increasingly in the future, product development is mostly A) a form of manufacturing B) a form of construction C) a form of knowledge creation Thanks to: Michael JamesPlease do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  57. 57. How Development is Different MANUFACTURING DEVELOPMENT Tasks are... Repetitive Non-repetitive Tasks are... Predictable Unpredictable Requirements are... A Constraint A Degree of Freedom Requirements are... Fixed Evolving Work is... Bounded Unbounded Cost of Delay is... Homogeneous Non-homogeneous Task Durations are... Homogeneous Non-homogeneous Variability is... Always harmful Sometime Required Inventory is... Visible Invisible Inventory is... Physical Objects Information In Product Development, “you always have to change the recipe to add value.” Reference: Donald G. Reinertsen, Workshop: The Science of Lean Product Development, 2012.Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  58. 58. Efficiency vs CreativityEfficiency programs such as Six Sigma are designedto identify problems in work processes—and then userigorous measurement to reduce variation andeliminate defects. When these types of initiativesbecome ingrained in a companys culture, as they didat 3M, creativity can easily get squelched. After all, abreakthrough innovation is something that challengesexisting procedures and norms. "Invention is by itsvery nature a disorderly process," says current CEOGeorge Buckley, who has dialled back many ofMcNerneys initiatives. Reference: http://www.businessweek.com/stories/2007-06-10/at-3m-a-struggle-between-efficiency-and-creativity Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  59. 59. Product Development consideredmore relevant than Manufacturing Take-away: Manufacturing and New Product Development are very different in nature. They are best served by very different management approaches. Be careful about copying too much from Manufacturing. Try looking at how the most innovative companies design new products.Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  60. 60. Study how Lean companies invent New Products W. Edwards Deming Decades of ‘Lean’ Manufacturing and Product Development in Japan1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 A new Describes Product Product Development as a form Development of Knowledge Paradigm Creation Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  61. 61. Point 9 for Management from Deming “Break down barriers between departments. People in research, design, sales, and production must work as a team, in order to foresee problems of production and usage that may be encountered with the product or service.” - W. Edwards Deming Reference: http://deming.org/index.cfm?content=66Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  62. 62. The New Paradigm is All-at-once Type A (e.g. at NASA) 1 2 3 4 Type B (e.g. at Fuji-Xerox) 1 2 3 4 Type C (e.g. at Honda, Canon) 1 2 3 4 Source: Hirotaka Takeuchi, Ikujiro Nonaka, The New New Product Development Game, Harvard Business Review, January-February 1986.Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  63. 63. Products developed using Type C Scrum Remember... this was in the early 80’s! Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  64. 64. A new management paradigm “This new emphasis on speed and flexibility calls for a different approach for managing new product development. The traditional sequential or “relay race” approach to product development... may conflict with the goals of maximum speed and flexibility. rugby Instead, a holistic or “______” approach – where the team tries to go the distance as a unit, passing the ball back and forth - may better serve today’s competitive requirements.” Source: Hirotaka Takeuchi, Ikujiro Nonaka, The New New Product Development Game, Harvard Business Review, January-February 1986.Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  65. 65. Self-organising Teams are key Although project teams are largely on their own, they are not uncontrolled. Management establishes enough checkpoints to prevent instability, ambiguity, and tension from turning into chaos. At the same time, management avoids the kind of rigid control that impairs creativity and spontaneity. - Takeuchi & NonakaPlease do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  66. 66. New, New Product Development Game influenced XP as well From: Kent Beck To: Jeff Sutherland <jsutherland> Reply: 70761.1216@compuserve.com Date: Mon, 15 May 1995 18:01:15 -0400 (EDT) Subj: HBR paper _________________________ Is there a good place to get reprints of the SCRUM paper from HBR? Ive written patterns for something very similar and I want to make sure I steal as many ideas as possible. Kent Thanks to: Joseph Pelrine.Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  67. 67. Take-away: Superior speed and flexibility can be achieved through disintermediation of silos of specialists and using cross-functional teams.Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  68. 68. Ingredients in the Formula Lean Iterative, Incremental The New, New Product Development Development Game Time-boxes Smalltalk Engineering Tools Scrum Source: Ken Schwaber.Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  69. 69. Additional Ingredients Empirical Process Control theory Complexity and Management - Babatunde A. Ogunnaike - Prof. Ralph D. StaceyHigh Perf Software Dev research Team Leadership - AT&T Bell Labs, Jim Coplien - Prof. J. Richard Hackman (RIP) Scrum Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  70. 70. Reference: Harrison, Neil B., and James O. Coplien. "Patterns of Productive Software Organizations." Bell Labs Technical Journal 1.1 (1996): 138-45Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  71. 71. Minimise roles for performancePlease do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  72. 72. Reference: Coplien, J., Borland Software Craftsmanship: A New Look at Process, Quality and Productivity, Proceedings of the 5th Annual Borland International Conference, Orlando, FL., 1994.Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  73. 73. Process control paradigm shift The reaction upon Ken Schwaber showing widely used software development methods to Ogunnaike and other process control experts...“They inspected the systems development processes thatI brought them. I have rarely provided a group with somuch laughter. They were amazed and appalled that myindustry, systems development, was trying to do its workusing a completely inappropriate process control model.” Reference: Ken Schwaber, Mike Beedle, Agile Software Development with Scrum, Prentice Hall, 2002. Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  74. 74. The emergence of a formula First book The word describing OOPSLA paper “Agile” is W. Edwards Scrum for on Scrum coined as an Deming software projects umbrella term Agile Manifesto Decades of ‘Lean’ Manufacturing and Product Development in Japan1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 A new Describes Product Product Development as a form Development of Knowledge Paradigm Creation Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  75. 75. * * The original metaphor of dwarfs on the shoulders of giants has been attributed to Bernard of Chartres in 1159.Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  76. 76. Creating the Scrum formulaSee Jeff Sutherland explain the creation of Scrum at: youtube.com/watch?v=O7cA1q0XwhE If you missed this session/section, this is a good summary of what was discussed in this section.
  77. 77. Take-away: The Scrum formula incorporates patterns from advanced product development and high performance software development so that you don’t have to re-invent it all to get going. You do need Agile and Lean principles to get the most out of it however.Please do not redistribute without the author’s permission. © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com
  78. 78. Please join us! Rowan Bunning @rowanb rowan@scrumwithstyle.comPlease do not redistribute without the author’s permission. au.linkedin.com/in/rowanbunning © 2013 Scrum WithStyle scrumwithstyle.com

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