Takase Bune 高瀬舟   森鴎外

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This short story was written by a noted Japanese writer, who was also an Imerial Army physician, whose medical training was in Germany. This gives a very unique view on alleviating suffering with love and compasion, compared to typical Judeo-Christian ethics.

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Takase Bune 高瀬舟   森鴎外

  1. 1. The Takase Boat: Takasebune Author(s): Mori Ogai and Edmund R. Skrzypczak Source: Monumenta Nipponica, Vol. 26, No. 1/2 (1971), pp. 181-189 Published by: Sophia University Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2383614 Accessed: 01/11/2009 20:36 Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use, available at http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp. JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use provides, in part, that unless you have obtained prior permission, you may not download an entire issue of a journal or multiple copies of articles, and you may use content in the JSTOR archive only for your personal, non-commercial use. Please contact the publisher regarding any further use of this work. Publisher contact information may be obtained at http://www.jstor.org/action/showPublisher?publisherCode=sophia. Each copy of any part of a JSTOR transmission must contain the same copyright notice that appears on the screen or printed page of such transmission. JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org. Sophia University is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to Monumenta Nipponica. http://www.jstor.org

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