Reprogramming Microbes
Genetic engineering  involves the  transfer of a gene  from an organism into a bacterium. Genetic Engineering Why do we us...
Plasmid removed from bacterial cell Human insulin gene placed into bacterial plasmid. Insulin gene cut and removed from hu...
Plasmid containing insulin gene placed into new bacterial cell Plasmid multiplies inside bacterial cell. More insulin is p...
Genetic Engineering  to Produce Insulin <ul><li>What is insulin and why do humans need to produce it in their bodies? </li...
Altering a species genotype <ul><li>Under each heading put the advantages or disadvantages of the method used to change an...
Biological Detergents Contain  enzymes  produced by  bacteria . <ul><li>Answer the questions on page 235 of Torrance. </li...
Discovered by Scottish scientist Sir Alexander Fleming! ANTIBIOTICS Fungus Bacteria
Testing for Antibiotic Sensitivity
Bacteria <ul><li>What is an antibiotic? </li></ul><ul><li>What is a multi disc? </li></ul>ANTIBIOTICS Glue in and label yo...
Immobilisation An immobilised cell or enzyme is one which  cannot move freely  because it has been deliberately attached t...
<ul><li>Stick in and label your copy of the immobilisation diagram. </li></ul><ul><li>What are the advantages of using imm...
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Reprogramming Microbes

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Reprogramming Microbes

  1. 1. Reprogramming Microbes
  2. 2. Genetic engineering involves the transfer of a gene from an organism into a bacterium. Genetic Engineering Why do we use bacteria? Bacterial Chromosome Plasmid Both are made up of genes Notes
  3. 3. Plasmid removed from bacterial cell Human insulin gene placed into bacterial plasmid. Insulin gene cut and removed from human chromosome. Human chromosome Insulin gene
  4. 4. Plasmid containing insulin gene placed into new bacterial cell Plasmid multiplies inside bacterial cell. More insulin is produced Bacterial cell grows and divides producing more cells containing many more plasmids and much more insulin Human insulin is collected and purified from bacterial cell
  5. 5. Genetic Engineering to Produce Insulin <ul><li>What is insulin and why do humans need to produce it in their bodies? </li></ul><ul><li>How can genetic engineering help people that cannot make their own insulin? </li></ul><ul><li>Complete your diagram showing the steps in insulin production by genetic engineering. </li></ul>Notes
  6. 6. Altering a species genotype <ul><li>Under each heading put the advantages or disadvantages of the method used to change an organisms genotype. </li></ul><ul><li>Answer Q4 of the Key Questions on page 232 of Torrance. </li></ul>Help: Success Guide p90 Torrance p230 Selective Breeding Traditional method Genetic Engineering Modern method Notes
  7. 7. Biological Detergents Contain enzymes produced by bacteria . <ul><li>Answer the questions on page 235 of Torrance. </li></ul><ul><li>Look at the table at the bottom of p234. Can you explain the results? </li></ul>Notes
  8. 8. Discovered by Scottish scientist Sir Alexander Fleming! ANTIBIOTICS Fungus Bacteria
  9. 9. Testing for Antibiotic Sensitivity
  10. 10. Bacteria <ul><li>What is an antibiotic? </li></ul><ul><li>What is a multi disc? </li></ul>ANTIBIOTICS Glue in and label your copy of the diagram testing antibiotics. Answer the following questions in full sentences. <ul><li>Which antibiotics is the bacteria resistant to? </li></ul><ul><li>How many antibiotics is the bacteria sensitive to? </li></ul><ul><li>Which antibiotic would you pick to treat this infection. Why? </li></ul><ul><li>Answer Q4 on p237 of Torrance. </li></ul>Antibiotics A B C D E F Notes
  11. 11. Immobilisation An immobilised cell or enzyme is one which cannot move freely because it has been deliberately attached to a substance (e.g. glass beads, gel balls) What does the word immobilised mean? Jelly bead + Enzyme or yeast cell Immobilised
  12. 12. <ul><li>Stick in and label your copy of the immobilisation diagram. </li></ul><ul><li>What are the advantages of using immobilised cells and enzymes? </li></ul><ul><li>Success Guides p91 Torrance p238 </li></ul>Batch and Continuous-Flow Processing <ul><li>Compare batch processing with continuous processing. </li></ul><ul><li>Why is continuous processing more advantageous than batch processing. </li></ul>Success Guides p91 Torrance p238
  13. 13. Congratulations!! You have just completed Standard Grade Biology

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