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April 14 2011 talk by Rosie Redfield at the University of Louisville. Title" What I learned from #arseniclife: communication and quality control in science

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  • Very gratifying, especially as everyone agreed.
  • The covalent radius of arsenic is about 11% larger than that of phosphorus.As-O bond lengths are about 13% longer than P-O bonds.
  • Was this a success for new media???
  • The short answer? EVERYTHING. But all the old ways are still around too.The long answer would take hours and hours.What follows is the medium-length answer – a very superficial survey in list form – I apologize in advance that it takes 11 slides...but the changes are so recent that I think it’s worth getting some perspective.
  • Explain what open access is here, will come back to it later. Open access and author-pays go hand in hand.
  • Ontologies: computer-readable, precise formulations of concepts (and the relationship among them) in a given field
  • Ontologies: computer-readable, precise formulations of concepts (and the relationship among them) in a given field
  • There are so many factors, and so much is beyond our control.Some of these changes were motivated by a desire to improve science, but most were driven by profit or convenience or events completely outside of science. How can we make the most of them, to improve science communication and thus scientific progress?
  • Very rapid progress when everything was out in the open.Can’t predict when small open action will have very large effect.
  • We don’t need to worry about nurturing competition – human nature will take care of that.And human nature also makes it hard to prevent the bad consequences of competition.Cooperation is both more powerful and harder to motivate. and it doesn’t have a bad side. Let’s try to foster openness and sharing (the Sesame Street virtues)
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