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Stella Vittoria Bertarione was born in Milan on
April 3, 1975 a...
“ My story as an archaeologist during excavation”

From 1999 she worked as an archaeologist in
many parts of the world,  s...
When the site was closed around in an inventory had to be made to
record and "take care" of the shards.  Everybody had to ...
“My life as a superintendent”

In 2008 Stella entered as superintendent after a
national competition.  She is responsible ...
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In 2008, _after passing an open competitive exam,  Ms.  Bertarione be a...
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“My story as ”

She deals with cultural tourism that deals with everything about a territory
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A Day in the Life of an Archaeologist"

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For the 4th work meeting of the Comenius "Let Stones Speak" project in Le Luc France, participating students had to prepare a presentation of "A Day in the Life of a ......".
Our pupils chose to interview an archaeologist, originally from Courmayeur, Stella Bertarione who has recently made a news-provoking discovery.

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A Day in the Life of an Archaeologist"

  1. 1. ’ ’ - '~“—’. — . .1‘ 7-. ,» '__ g , _ . -. Ll "To live as if it were the last
  2. 2. N __‘ . m‘= '? ‘Lg’. ,. .:; ,v ' ': _:"’_~. ;,Y ' , -1‘ Stella Vittoria Bertarione was born in Milan on April 3, 1975 and she lived for many years in Aosta, the regional capital ofAosta Valley. Her career began as an archaeologist, then she was chosen as Superintendent, following a competitive selective exam, for the Department of Tourism . Now she believes in being an "archaeologist narrator” because she can talk about her experience on the sites. it
  3. 3. “ My story as an archaeologist during excavation” From 1999 she worked as an archaeologist in many parts of the world, such as in southern Italy, in France, in Syria, in Turkey Working as an archaeologist meant being in a "Military Camp" because, just like Stella says, working on excavations was like being in an army. The alarm rang, in fact, at 6.00 in the morning and everyone had their own task. The first had to wake up those who were assigned to the preparation of the breakfast room. At 7:30 they began working on the archaeological site and dug until 12:00. From midday to 1pm there was a lunch break, during which they often ate sandwiches, because time was short. At 1pm they began working again until 4.30pm, when the yard was closed and so they put their tools in order until 5pm.
  4. 4. When the site was closed around in an inventory had to be made to record and "take care" of the shards. Everybody had to do the inventory! Besides, there was an official excavation diary, which documented everything, so the day a new archaeologist came, she/ he had to know exactly how they had started the excavations and especially know what choices had been made. Another job was to design or draw "painstakingly" because it was difficultto know how to draw the «map» of the excavation to perfection. There were also the employees who left the site earlier to prepare lunch and the same thing at dinner. Very often they slept in unappealing hostels or in schools and often they even slept in cave! Only inlsome cases you could go home to A s eep. Being an archaeologist is a job which involves the use of physical and intellectual activities, but there were some situations where we were put to the test. For example, in Venice, we suffered a "natural selection" because the excavations at this site were done in all types of weather (in the muddy ground, in the pouring rain, under a scorching sun . .)
  5. 5. “My life as a superintendent” In 2008 Stella entered as superintendent after a national competition. She is responsible for managing large construction projects, which means obtaining changes in zoning laws, running meetings, doing project assessments and monitoring archeology done by technicians from an outside firm.
  6. 6. !| ||l"l3' 'l| ' -—seIstice. The results show t In 2008, _after passing an open competitive exam, Ms. Bertarione be an working in_the Superintendence for Cultural Heritage. She is resposi | e_ for the bureaucratic _management of large archaeological construction site rojects, contracts, adjustmehtscf master p| an_s, _ the pro ect evaluation_ and t e archaeological monitoring and supervising of al the work, which is done by experts from an outside company. _ _ _ DUI_'| n the fast few years, she has taken part in two large construction site PT0J€‘. C 3- . . . . . . . One is Pon_t d'A_e| , which IS a Roman aqueduct brige that was originally buit in 3 B. C and it IS situated near_Co n_e. _ _ The second one_ is Torre dei Ba ivi, which nowada s IS a conservato_ry. The researche on this tower was done from 2000 to _2 14 but M_s. Bertarione began working on it in 2009. She made a really important historic discovery because she ound a_ corner block stone with phallic symbols and reliefs that lead to the astronomical orientation of Augusta Praetoria Salassorum (modern Aosta), founded around 25 B. _C after the_ victory of Au ustus’s army over the Salassis. As a matter of fact, in Croce di Cit_ta on_ the 1° december she made an observation of the sun's alignment that rises in cardo maximus, the_ north- south axis of the city. This happened only during the days near the winter _ _ _ _ ha he_ town was oriented in _such a wa as to in_point Au ustus ‘cognitive’ relationship with_ the ‘cosmic’ signs 0 renewal. his researc was done with the Professor _Giu| io _Mag| i, who IS a full professor of Archeoastronomy at the Po| _itecnico di Milan (Milan _| stitute of Technology). This discovery_wa_s published in several bulletins and journals but the mos important publication was in the Cambridge Archeological Journal
  7. 7. 91* i~‘. ‘v’. '* . v’ “My story as ” She deals with cultural tourism that deals with everything about a territory and its artistic, culinary and ethnological peculiarities. She especially deals with communication and for that she followed various courses: now she writes a blog and Facebook pages of the Aosta Valley Region where she shows some artistic cultural itineraries, she tells about curiosities that are related to our region. She also collaborates with some radio advertising campaigns. She is a sort of archeologist narrator. She cooperates with the Superintendence on a project about the “Via delle Gal| ie” which will become a site and a video and events will be created around it. Generally she stays in the office, but often she accompanies guests around the Aosta valley, illustrating artistic and cultural peculiarities, but also gastronomic delicacies, because “food is culture! ” In her opinion there is still lot of work to do in order to show the functions of the Superintendence. It must be present on social networks and create events which, like in France, explain to the inhabitants or tourists what archeologists are doing in excavations, so open sites to the public. The job of an archeologist is not only digging the site, but -- ' me. site known hw th , V

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