UserManualScrivener 2.3 for Mac OS XLiterature & LatteJuly, 2012Revision: 2.3.1-02 c 2010–2012, Literature & Latte LTD. Al...
II    Preparation                        47                                                7 Project Management           ...
CONTENTS                                                                                          iii11 Gathering Material...
iv                                                                                     CONTENTS     21.2     QuickReferenc...
CONTENTS                                                                                           v   A.6     Documents M...
AcknowledgementsMany thanks to the following people for very kindly donating time or code to Scrivener:   Heinrich Gliesen...
viihis work on Bean.                               The redoubtable Douglas Davidson, AppleBrent Simmons—the OPML importer ...
Part IIntroduction     1
Chapter 1                             Philosophy                                                        The maker of a sen...
3you should find that its features and design provide a set of basic abilities which canamplify your method and make the me...
4                                                    CHAPTER 1. PHILOSOPHY  The overriding philosophy behind Scrivener was...
Chapter 2                   About This ManualThis manual has been written using Scrivener and is available in three differ...
6                                           CHAPTER 2. ABOUT THIS MANUALexporting and printing your work. In each section ...
2.1. TERMS AND CONVENTIONS                                                          7  When a keyboard shortcut requires a...
Chapter 3                          What’s NewScrivener 2 is a major revision, featuring comprehensive overhauls of the int...
9Locked View ModesThe particular type of view mode used to display a container or collection can belocked to that containe...
10                                                               CHAPTER 3. WHAT’S NEWwill not apply to you, and we have n...
11empty file. Make easy to-do lists, quickly generate character profiles, or fill out refer-ence tables for research you are ...
12                                                    CHAPTER 3. WHAT’S NEWEdit   Insert   MathType Equation.Once added to...
13Full Screen for Lion[10.7+ (Lion) Only] For those who have upgraded to Mac OS X Lion (10.7), thenew full screen feature ...
14                                                          CHAPTER 3. WHAT’S NEWall of the sections your editor has marke...
15Better View IntegrationThe relationship between corkboard, outliner, and editor was, for many, a stumblingblock when lea...
16                                                  CHAPTER 3. WHAT’S NEWright spot. Now you can set up a template folder ...
17   Custom Binder Icons: Create or import your own custom icons and assign themto documents and folders in the binder.   ...
18                                                     CHAPTER 3. WHAT’S NEWthese files will be stored in your project, tur...
Chapter 4      Installation and UpgradingIf you purchased Scrivener through the Mac App Store, then this chapter will notb...
20                                CHAPTER 4. INSTALLATION AND UPGRADINGmachines. It is best to install and register Scrive...
4.3. APPLICATION UPDATES                                                             214.2.3 Registering ScrivenerAfter pu...
22                                CHAPTER 4. INSTALLATION AND UPGRADING     is and what your data is. On these devices, de...
4.4. UPGRADING FROM SCRIVENER 1                                                        23  The project file format has been...
24                         CHAPTER 4. INSTALLATION AND UPGRADING       wrong version’s help. Instead, load the PDF in your...
Chapter 5                                InterfaceThe Scrivener interface has been carefully designed to cover a wide rang...
26                                                       CHAPTER 5. INTERFACE                             Figure 5.1: The ...
5.1. INTERFACE OVERVIEW                                                             27by dragging the divider line between...
28                                                        CHAPTER 5. INTERFACE        Some templates will have renamed thi...
5.1. INTERFACE OVERVIEW                                                                 29   At the top of each editor is ...
30                                                      CHAPTER 5. INTERFACE5.1.5 The InspectorThe Inspector is not always...
5.1. INTERFACE OVERVIEW                                                           31      between the modified and created ...
32                                                          CHAPTER 5. INTERFACE      snapshot and the current text. The R...
User manual Scrivener 2.3 for Mac
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User manual Scrivener 2.3 for Mac

  1. 1. UserManualScrivener 2.3 for Mac OS XLiterature & LatteJuly, 2012Revision: 2.3.1-02 c 2010–2012, Literature & Latte LTD. All rights reserved.
  2. 2. II Preparation 47 7 Project Management 50 Contents 7.1 7.2 Project Size Limitations . Creating a New Project . . 50 51 7.3 Saving and Making Copies 52 7.4 Opening Existing Projects 52 7.5 Moving and DeletingContents ii Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 7.6 Splitting Projects Up . . . 53Acknowledgements vi 7.7 Templates . . . . . . . . . . 54 7.8 Backing Up Your Work . 59 7.9 Tips for Working Cross-I Introduction 1 Platform . . . . . . . . . . . 63 7.10 Sandboxing and Autho-1 Philosophy 2 rised Directories . . . . . . 642 About This Manual 5 8 Setting Up the Binder 67 2.1 Terms and Conventions . 6 8.1 How the Binder is Or- ganised . . . . . . . . . . . . 673 What’s New 8 8.2 Binder Controls . . . . . . 71 8.3 Using Collections . . . . . 724 Installation and Upgrading 19 8.4 Document Templates . . . 79 4.1 Portable Installations . . . 19 8.5 Custom Icons . . . . . . . . 83 4.2 Registering . . . . . . . . . . 20 9 Navigating and Organising 86 4.3 Application Updates . . . 21 9.1 General Navigation . . . . 86 4.4 Upgrading from 9.2 Go To Menu . . . . . . . . . 87 Scrivener 1 . . . . . . . . . . 22 9.3 Hoisting the Binder . . . . 88 4.5 Staying Informed . . . . . . 24 9.4 Controlling Binder Inte- gration . . . . . . . . . . . . 905 Interface 25 9.5 Linking Documents To- 5.1 Interface Overview . . . . 25 gether . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 5.2 View Modes . . . . . . . . . 32 9.6 Using Favourites . . . . . . 99 5.3 Composition Mode (Full 9.7 Layouts Panel . . . . . . . . 100 Screen Editing) . . . . . . . 35 9.8 Full Screen Mode . . . . . . 102 5.4 Selections . . . . . . . . . . . 35 9.9 Filtering Items in Views . 1046 Quick Tour 37 10 Setting Up Meta-Data 105 6.1 Project Format . . . . . . . 37 10.1 Meta-Data Types . . . . . . 105 6.2 The Main Window . . . . 39 10.2 Copying Meta-Data Be- 6.3 Outlining Your Draft . . . 40 tween Projects . . . . . . . . 111 6.4 Scrivenings Mode . . . . . 43 10.3 Project Keywords . . . . . 111 6.5 More About Corkboards . 44 10.4 Project Properties . . . . . 112 6.6 Compiling the Draft . . . 45 10.5 Text Preferences . . . . . . 114 ii
  3. 3. CONTENTS iii11 Gathering Material 115 17.1 Using Background Image 11.1 File Import . . . . . . . . . . 115 and Textures . . . . . . . . . 216 11.2 Scrivener Services . . . . . 121 17.2 The Control Strip . . . . . 216 11.3 Scratch Pad Panel . . . . . . 122 17.3 Floating Inspector HUD . 218 11.4 Print as PDF to Scrivener 123 17.4 Customising Appearance 218 17.5 Composition Mode with12 Project Planning 124 Multiple Displays . . . . . 218 12.1 The Corkboard . . . . . . . 124 12.2 The Outliner . . . . . . . . 130 18 Annotations and Footnotes 220 12.3 Project Notes . . . . . . . . 134 18.1 Inline Notation . . . . . . . 222 18.2 Linked Notation . . . . . . 22613 Cloud Integration and Sharing 136 18.3 General Usage Tips for 13.1 Simplenote . . . . . . . . . . 136 Notation . . . . . . . . . . . 230 13.2 Synchronised Folders . . . 144 18.4 Text Colour and Highlights 234 13.3 Which to Use? . . . . . . . 153 18.5 Marking Revisions . . . . . 238 13.4 Index Card for iOS . . . . 154 18.6 Text Markings and Multi- 13.5 Scrivener Everywhere . . . 158 Markdown . . . . . . . . . . 240 19 Inspector 242III Writing 162 19.1 Synopsis Card . . . . . . . . 242 19.2 General Meta-Data View . 24314 The Editor 165 19.3 Document Support Panes 243 14.1 Header Bar . . . . . . . . . . 165 14.2 Footer Bar . . . . . . . . . . 169 19.4 Locking the Inspector . . . 249 14.3 Viewing Media in the Ed- 19.5 Advanced Inspector Key- itor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 board Usage . . . . . . . . . 250 14.4 Splitting the Editor . . . . 173 20 Scriptwriting 25215 Writing and Editing 177 20.1 Formatting a Script in 15.1 Rich Text Editing Philos- Scrivener . . . . . . . . . . . 252 ophy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 20.2 Using Page View to Esti- 15.2 Editing Basics . . . . . . . . 178 mate Page Counts . . . . . 255 15.3 Editing with Scrivener . . 180 20.3 Importing a Script from 15.4 Formatting Tools . . . . . . 188 Final Draft and Other 15.5 Using Snapshots . . . . . . 202 Programs . . . . . . . . . . . 255 15.6 Auto-Completion . . . . . 205 20.4 Printing or Exporting a 15.7 Text Bookmarks . . . . . . 208 Script . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258 15.8 Editing Multiple Docu- 20.5 Working with Final ments . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209 Draft 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . 258 20.6 Creating Your Own16 Page View 213 Script Formats . . . . . . . 260 16.1 Setting Page View Di- 20.7 Using Script Formatting mensions . . . . . . . . . . . 213 for Other Purposes . . . . 266 16.2 Tips for Accuracy . . . . . 213 21 Writing Tools 26717 Composition Mode 215 21.1 Searching and Replacing . 267
  4. 4. iv CONTENTS 21.2 QuickReference . . . . . . 276 24.17 Replacements . . . . . . . . 366 21.3 Goals and Statistics 24.18 Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . 370 Tracking Tools . . . . . . . 279 24.19 Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . 371 21.4 Recording Audio and 24.20 Footnotes/Comments . . 371 Photo Notes . . . . . . . . . 286 24.21 Page Settings . . . . . . . . . 377 21.5 The Name Generator . . . 287 24.22 Compatibility . . . . . . . . 381 21.6 Bibliography Management 289 24.23 Meta-Data . . . . . . . . . . 381 21.7 Using Equations with 24.24 RTF Compatibility . . . . 385 MathType . . . . . . . . . . 289 24.25 Quick Font Override . . . 386 24.26 KindleGen . . . . . . . . . . 38622 Using MultiMarkdown 291 22.1 What is Markdown? . . . . 291 25 Exporting 388 22.2 What is MultiMarkdown? 292 25.1 Drag and Drop Between 22.3 Getting Started with MMD 293 Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . 388 22.4 MMD and Scrivener . . . . 294 25.2 Exporting Binder Files . . 388 22.5 Compiling . . . . . . . . . . 300 25.3 Exporting to an Outliner 22.6 Importing MMD Files . . 305 with OPML . . . . . . . . . 389 22.7 MMD Meta-Data . . . . . . 306 25.4 Exporting Meta-Data to a 22.8 Updating MultiMarkdown 306 Spreadsheet . . . . . . . . . 391 22.9 Further Information . . . 306 26 Printing 393 26.1 Document Printing . . . . 393IV Final Phases 307 26.2 Printing Index Cards . . . 395 26.3 Printing Outlines . . . . . 39723 Creating a Table of Contents 310 26.4 Printing the Draft . . . . . 39824 Compiling the Draft 313 24.1 Compile Summary . . . . 313 V Advanced 400 24.2 Built-in Presets . . . . . . . 316 24.3 Available Compile Formats 318 27 MultiMarkdown Tips and Tricks 402 24.4 Compiling and Saving 27.1 Functional Annotations Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . 326 and Comments . . . . . . . 402 24.5 Expanded Compile Inter- 27.2 Multiple Footnote face . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 327 Streams with MMD . . . . 403 24.6 Contents . . . . . . . . . . . 329 28 Customising Keyboard Shortcuts 404 24.7 Print Settings . . . . . . . . 336 24.8 Separators . . . . . . . . . . 337 24.9 Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . 340 VI Appendices 405 24.10 Formatting . . . . . . . . . . 343 24.11 Title Adjustments . . . . . 356 A Menus and Keyboard Shortcuts 406 24.12 Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . 357 A.1 Scrivener Menu . . . . . . . 406 24.13 Script Settings . . . . . . . . 360 A.2 File Menu . . . . . . . . . . 407 24.14 Transformations . . . . . . 362 A.3 Edit Menu . . . . . . . . . . 411 24.15 HTML Settings . . . . . . . 365 A.4 View Menu . . . . . . . . . 419 24.16 PDF Settings . . . . . . . . 365 A.5 Project Menu . . . . . . . . 430
  5. 5. CONTENTS v A.6 Documents Menu . . . . . 432 B.11 Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . 480 A.7 Format Menu . . . . . . . . 439 A.8 Window Menu . . . . . . . 445 C Placeholder Tags 482 A.9 Help Menu . . . . . . . . . . 446 D Tips and Tricks and Trouble 483 D.1 Getting Support . . . . . . 483B Preferences 448 D.2 Bookmarks or Small Files 483 B.1 Preference Presets and D.3 Using Scrivener in a Se- Themes . . . . . . . . .... 449 cure Environment . . . . . 484 B.2 General . . . . . . . . .... 450 D.4 Hidden Preferences . . . . 485 B.3 Appearance . . . . . .... 453 D.5 Troubleshooting . . . . . . 490 B.4 Corkboard . . . . . . .... 457 B.5 Compose . . . . . . . .... 462 E Project Bundle Format 492 B.6 Navigation . . . . . . .... 465 E.1 The Files Folder . . . . . . 493 B.7 Editor . . . . . . . . . .... 468 E.2 The Settings Folder . . . . 494 B.8 Formatting . . . . . . .... 472 E.3 The Snapshots Folder . . . 494 B.9 Corrections . . . . . .... 474 B.10 Import and Export .... 476 F Legal 495
  6. 6. AcknowledgementsMany thanks to the following people for very kindly donating time or code to Scrivener: Heinrich Gliesen—help with inline image Philip Dow (author of Journler6 )—help withscaling. the custom ruler code.Jonathon Mah—help with the bubble high- Wagner Truppel for help figuring out howlights around comments and footnotes. to draw the diagonal status text in the cork-Andreas Mayer—NSBezierPath and table board.view extensions1 . Martin Wierschin of Nisus, for various helpAndrew C. Stone—smart quotes code2 . with the chicaneries of the text system andTodd Ransom (author of Avenir) at RTF.returnself.com—filtering and page number Peter Maurer—help with the custom ani-printing code. mated disclosure triangles (and kindly pro-Jesse Grosjean (author of Mori and Write- vided the images too).Room) at Hog Bay Software—auto-saving Christian and Eric at Devon Technologies7 —code. help with keeping Scrivener in the back-Split view code based on OASplitView from ground when the clippings services are used.the excellent OmniGroup3 . Positive Spin Media—the tab bar in theAndy Matuschak—for various resources and project notepad uses PSMTabBarControl,great code snippets available on his website. Copyright c 2005, Positive Spin MediaMatt Gemmell—various code snippets (in- (all rights reserved), which in turn uses por-cluding the colour contrast code, the use of tions of code from Copyright 2004 The ShiiraQuick Look for the file link view and the Project8 (all rights reserved).corkboard options bubble window) from his Malte Rosenau—for pointing me in the direc-source code site4 . tion of the code I needed to import web pagesAndy Matuschak5 and Matt Gemmell are with their titles intact.also responsible for the basis of the code for James Hoover, creator of Bean9 , for provid-Scrivener’s HUD panels in Tiger (code to be ing the basis of the “show invisibles” code andfound on their respective web sites). for sharing various other code snippets from 1 http://www.harmless.de/cocoa.html 2 http://www.stone.com 3 http://www.omnigroup.com 4 http://mattgemmell.com/source/ 5 http://andymatuschak.org 6 http://journler.com/ 7 http://www.devon-technologies.com 8 http://www.positivespinmedia.com 9 http://www.bean-osx.com vi
  7. 7. viihis work on Bean. The redoubtable Douglas Davidson, AppleBrent Simmons—the OPML importer code engineer and guru, for responding so help-is based on a class created by Brent Simmons fully to so many of my enquiries about thefor NetNewswire (Copyright c 2002, Brent intricacies of the Cocoa text system.Simmons). Aki Inoue at Apple for advice about the wordShortcut Recorder is c Contributors of count code.ShortcutRecorder10 —thanks to Jesse Gros- Fletcher Penney, for contributing so muchjean for pointing me in the direction of this time and effort in helping me get MultiMark-project. down implemented in Scrivener.Nathan Day—the PDF Services alias file is Everyone on the Cocoa-Dev list for theircreated using Nathan Day’s NDAlias class11 . help and support, with special mention toMark Onyschuk—help with the window flip- Bill Cheeseman, Malcom Crawford, Maxping code for the templates panel, which is and Marcus at Blue Technologies (authorsbased on his LIFlipEffect12 . of Ulysses), J. Nozzi at Bartas TechnologiesKino—the Snapshot comparison tool was in- (author of CopyWrite).spired in large part by Kino’s “Compare Doc- Stephen Kochan, author of Programminguments” macro for Nisus Writer Pro. in Objective-C, for answering my questionsRobert Warwick13 —the improvements to when I was getting started.text table support are based on code Robert Many thanks to the developer of Index Card,wrote for Stone Hill Invoicer. “DenVog”, who went out of his way to helpImproved PDF anti-aliasing was provided by get syncing to work between Index Card anda line of code from Skim14 . Scrivener. Beta Testers Too many to mention everyone, but a big thanks to all of you, especially thosewho helped beta test during the early stages - your feedback led directly to the free-ware release of Scrivener Gold and a much enhanced Scrivener. Special mention to:Alexandria Pallas-Weinbrecht, for all the help in testing Scrivener’s composition modeon a dual-monitor set up.Ernesto Salcedo, for help with a bug in viewing webarchives.Sophie, for implementation ideas in expanding Scrivener’s MultiMarkdown capabili-ties. And in the best Oscars-speech-style, thanks to Kurt Vonnegut for making me wantto write and my father for buying me a ZX Spectrum when I was a boy and thusforever turning me into a geek. — Keith Blount 10 http://code.google.com/p/shortcutrecorder/ 11 http://homepage.mac.com/nathan_day/pages/source.xml 12 http://www.lorem.ca 13 http://www.codehackers.net 14 http://skim-app.sourceforge.net/
  8. 8. Part IIntroduction 1
  9. 9. Chapter 1 Philosophy The maker of a sentence launches out into the infinite and builds a road into Chaos and old Night, and is followed by those who hear him with something of wild, creative delight. Ralph Waldo Emerson Most word processors and text editors aimed at writers assume the creative processwill take place in linear form; that is, they assume that the writer knows how his orher work will begin and will start at the beginning and continue through until reach-ing the end, and for those that do work that way, they assume that a linear form isa useful format for a text that spans hundreds of pages. Planning and restructuringis therefore forced into a separate workflow—the writer must either plan before be-ginning and keep track of hundreds of different files using the computer or face thelaborious task of cutting and pasting numerous chunks of text to restructure a longpiece of work at the end. For shorter pieces of writing, this is not a massive prob-lem, but for longer texts—such as novels or academic theses—the writer can oftenfind him- or herself battling against the tools of their trade. What a word processordoes get right is in not presuming anything of your working methods. It is, at thecore, ruthlessly simple. Scrivener is part of a new breed of writing software which focusses more on provid-ing a solid open-ended writing tool (as the word processor does) rather than a writingprocess, which presumes a system upon you. As with a word processor, there are nochapters or sections or scenes; how you use the software determines these things, notsome feature baked into the program. Scrivener’s design is fairly unique in that iteasily provides a platform for writers of many philosophies and disciplines. It’s a toolthat works equally well for a doctoral dissertation, as it does for writing a short storyor a screenplay. Often you will hear of “pantsers” vs. “plotsers” in writing circles. Those that writeby the seat of their pants and those that plot everything out before they start. Youwill not find that this program urges you into one way of working or another. Rather 2
  10. 10. 3you should find that its features and design provide a set of basic abilities which canamplify your method and make the mechanics of writing easier for you. If you startwith a big pile of files that need to be sewn together, you’ll probably find an emergentoutline to be useful. If you make the outline first, you’ll probably find the integratedoutline-is-your-book approach to be useful. No longer will you need to maintain aseparate outline document that needs to be kept up to date with the text of the book.The two will be one and the same. No more will you need elaborate spreadsheets totrack crucial details. All of that can be woven right into the mechanical structure thatis your book in this software. Scrivener was developed because no other writing environment quite provided allof the features required for the sort of writing that demands easy access to research, aquick overview of numerous documents and the easy restructuring of swathes of text. The main concepts of Scrivener can be summarised as follows: l The software should allow the writer to use many of the formatting features familiar to word processors—different fonts, italics, paragraph styles and so on. It is up to the writer to avoid distractions, not the software. l What looks good in print is not always the best way of viewing something on the screen: the software should allow the user to completely reformat the text on export or for printing without affecting the original (thus making it easy to export a manuscript in a format suitable for an editor and then export it just as easily in a format more suited to publishing on the internet). l There should be a synopsis linked with each document that can be viewed with other synopses to get an overview of the project as a whole. l Linked to the above, it should be easy to view the project as an outline and use drag and drop to restructure the project. Moving between the outline and the text itself should be fluid. l It should be possible to view individual “documents” either as discrete chunks of text or combined with other (arbitrary) documents. Thus, for instance, a chapter could be viewed as a whole or each scene could be viewed individually. l The user should be able to view more than one document at the same time—for instance, the end of one chapter alongside the beginning of the next, a character sketch alongside a scene in which that character appears, or a research document alongside the writing it is being used to support. l The software should be capable of storing and displaying common research documents, because writers do not just use text—they also refer to images, web pages, recorded interviews and other media.
  11. 11. 4 CHAPTER 1. PHILOSOPHY The overriding philosophy behind Scrivener was in part inspired by a passage writ-ten by the author Hilary Mantel in a collection of essays by writers on the process ofwriting entitled The Agony and the Ego. Hilary Mantel described a process of “grow-ing a book, rather than writing one,” which can be summed up as follows: 1. During the first stage of writing, you might jot ideas down on index cards— phrases, character names, scene ideas; any insight or glimpse. 2. When you have gathered a few index cards, you might pin them to a corkboard. Other ideas build around them, and you might even write out a few paragraphs and pin them behind the index card with which they are associated. At this stage, the index cards have no particular order. 3. Eventually, you may begin to see an order emerging and re-pin the index cards accordingly. 4. After you have gathered enough material, you might take all of your index cards, sheets of paper and jottings and place them into a ring-binder. You are still free to move everything around, but now you have a good idea of how much work you have done and how much more work you have to do. Scrivener is thus a nonlinear writing tool that provides the writer with all of thefeatures found in any text editor along with the functionality for “growing” yourwork organically within the program itself in a way which will become more usefulthe more you write, naturally and effortlessly.
  12. 12. Chapter 2 About This ManualThis manual has been written using Scrivener and is available in three different for-mats. If you purchased a boxed copy of Scrivener, you should have a printed versionof it available for desktop reference. It can also be accessed as a PDF from the Helpmenu, under User Manual. You should also find two copies which have been speciallyformatted to be printed on either US Letter or A4 standard printer paper on our web-site1 . Lastly, the Scrivener project used to author the manual can be downloaded fromthe Support section of the Literature & Latte website as a demonstration of writingin Scrivener. It has been written using the MultiMarkdown formatting syntax and sodemonstrates that system as well. Annotating the PDF: If you wish to make notes and annotate the PDF using software such as Reader or Skim, it is recommended you download a separate copy, or locate the PDF in the Scrivener installation and drag a copy out for your own personal use. When Scrivener updates, it will very likely overwrite the existing PDF in the installation (often with revisions to the text), which will destroy any of your notes. The manual itself has been split into five primary sections and an appendix. Thefirst section introduces Scrivener’s terminology and interface and gives a quick tourfor those who want to start writing as soon as possible. It is highly recommendedthat you also go through the separately available Interactive Tutorial (which can beaccessed via the Help menu in Scrivener) to get the most out of Scrivener and elimi-nate confusion over some of its unique features, but the Quick Tour (chapter 6) shouldhave you writing using Scrivener’s basic main features within half an hour. Scrivener has a wide variety of features to accommodate many different purposes,including novels, screenplays, academic papers and dissertations, general non-fiction,journalism, blogging, and much more. While it strives to present as simple an inter-face as possible, once you start digging into the application, you will find a degree offlexibility and complexity to suit even the most esoteric needs. To help organise all ofthese concepts, the next three sections take a pragmatic look at the primary stages ofany major project, Preparation (Part II), Writing (Part III), and Final Phases (Part IV),and detail Scrivener’s tools for aiding you through the drafting process and ultimately 1 http://www.literatureandlatte.com/support.php 5
  13. 13. 6 CHAPTER 2. ABOUT THIS MANUALexporting and printing your work. In each section the features most useful to youduring those phases will be explained in depth. If you want to find a specific feature,consult the appendices at the end of the manual for a cross-referenced list to everymenu item and window. Users who are already familiar with prior versions of Scrivener will want to consultthe What’s New section (chapter 3), where new major features are briefly explainedand a list of minor changes and features is provided as well.2.1 Terms and ConventionsSome features apply only to the standard version of the software, and others onlyapply to the Mac App Store version. Various key features will be marked to indicatethis. If you have purchased the program directly from our web site, then you havethe standard version. If you used Apple’s App Store tool to buy Scrivener, then youhave the Mac App Store version. Sections applicable to only one or the other will beindicated as such: l Standard retail version of Scrivener: [Standard Version] l Mac App Store version of Scrivener: [App Store Version] Whenever the documentation refers to an action that must be taken by you, thevisible name for that action will be formatted like so. Button labels, menu items, andkeyboard shortcuts will all be displayed in this fashion. Menus will be displayed in a hierarchy using the “ ” character to separate top-level, sub-menu, and items. Example: To convert a range of selected text to uppercase,invoke the Format Convert To Uppercase command. Keyboard shortcuts will use the following symbols: l –: The Command key, or the Apple key, is the one located directly to the left and right of your spacebar. l : The Option key is also labelled the Alt key on some keyboards, depending on which country you purchased your Mac from. Some laptops only have one Option key on the left side. l : Control is usually located to the left and right of the Option keys on their respective side. Some laptops only have one Control key between the Option key and the Fn key on the left side. l : The Shift keys are rarely used by themselves in shortcuts but are often used in combination with other modifier keys.
  14. 14. 2.1. TERMS AND CONVENTIONS 7 When a keyboard shortcut requires a combination of modifier keys, they will beprinted together. Example: – V, which matches Edit Paste and Match Style,means you should hold down all three of these modifier keys and then tap the V keyon your keyboard. The hyphen is used to separate the modifier keys from the targetkey and is not meant to be included in the shortcut itself. Interface elements will be capitalised as proper nouns to help differentiate themfrom standard nouns when appropriate. A Collection is an interface element, whilethe word “collection” can be used to indicate a casual grouping of items, and notnecessarily a formal Collection. Some of the names for various elements within Scrivener are customisable on a perproject basis, and how you name these will impact much of the interface. A goodexample is the Draft, the place where your manuscript in progress is built. This canbe called whatever you like, and what you name it will impact the names of menuitems that refer to it. In all cases, this documentation will refer to these malleableelements by their default names. In cases where file paths are printed, the UNIX convention of providing a short-hand to describe your personal home folder will be used. An example might looklike: ~/Documents The tilde is a shorthand which means: “/Users/yourusername”. In this case, thepath refers to the Documents folder in your home folder.
  15. 15. Chapter 3 What’s NewScrivener 2 is a major revision, featuring comprehensive overhauls of the interfaceto make it even more intuitive and easy to use. It includes a substantial list of long-awaited new features, such as a better style system, non-linear collections of docu-ments, free-form corkboards, better snapshot integration, and much more. We un-derstand that you are a busy person, and while new software can be fun for some,others just want to keep working in the ways they are used to. Scrivener 2 has beendesigned so that the majority of the new features will not get in your way until youwant them, allowing you to be up and running with a minimal period of transition.When you do get the time to explore the new features, they are easily accessible andwe think you’ll find they add valuable tools and methods to your writing process. In addition to the list below, you might want to also check out the new preferences(Appendix B) and menus (Appendix A).New in 2.3Improved Microsoft Word & OpenOffice ConvertersIn the past, RTF has been the primary input/output format in Scrivener, as its .doc/xand .odt export engine relied upon Apple’s free utilities, which were lacking in fea-tures and had a number of formatting bugs. Scrivener how has the option of us-ing the Aspose libraries for document conversion, resulting in .doc/x and .odt fileswhich equal the level of quality available to RTF. This impacts both import and ex-port/compile. Read more about the Improved Import and Export Engine (subsec-tion 24.3.2).Improved Layout Compile FormattingThe PDF/Print compile system has been augmented to allow for more formattingoptions, and now includes two separate modes, one for “publishing” and another for“proofing”. The new features should allow for more direct-publishing options outof Scrivener, without having to rely upon an intermediary layout application such asword processors or desktop layout software to do so. Read more about these newoptions in the section on PDF output, in the compiler (subsection 24.3.3). 8
  16. 16. 9Locked View ModesThe particular type of view mode used to display a container or collection can belocked to that container. You could, for example, set your Character Sheets folder toalways use the Corkboard view mode no matter what view mode you are preferringto use at the time in the rest of the project. Read Locking the View Mode, for moreinformation (subsection 9.4.1).Slide-out Sidebars[10.7+ (Lion) Only] When using OS X 10.7+ with full screen mode, when theInspector or Binder is hidden, it will automatically slide in and out of view when themouse is moved to the far left or right of the display, or when a keyboard shortcut isused to access them. In addition, you can set an option which will automatically hidethe sidebars when entering full screen, to better focus the interface on your work.MultiMarkdown 3The internal MultiMarkdown engine has been upgraded to the new MMD version3.6, and its syntax generation and compiler functions have been revamped to pro-vide support for the new features in MMD3. You can now compile directly to PDF(provided you have a functional TeXLive/pdflatex distribution installed) and ODT,including the original functions of RTF, HTML, plain MMD and LTEX. The latter Aoption has a new compile option pane which makes switching document classes aseasy as a single drop-down menu.Sandboxing[App Store Version] Scrivener for the Mac App Store now complies with Apple’snew sandboxing rules, which means it will no longer access files on your system with-out express permission by you. This means that by necessity some things originallyleft open will now be hidden from you in the sandbox container, and it also meansyou may need to authorise Scrivener to access things that your projects have referredto in the past. Please read Sandboxing and Authorised Directories (section 7.10) forfurther details. This is mainly a concern for those who use References, linked imagesand aliased research documents in their projects. For most self-contained project uses,you may not notice any differences with the software at all. Everyone, however, will want to check their preferred backup location, prior toinstalling the update. This is very important. If you have customised where Scrivenersaves its automatically generated backups, this customisation will be lost and the newbackup folder will be located inside of the sandboxed container. Open your Backuppreferences panel and switch the backup location to your preferred location. Thisaction will give Scrivener permission to access the external folder in the future. Again, this only applies to those who have purchased the product from Apple. Ifyou purchased Scrivener from our website or a retailer like Amazon.com, sandboxing
  17. 17. 10 CHAPTER 3. WHAT’S NEWwill not apply to you, and we have no intention of making it a universal requirement.It is only applied to the App Store version as their store requires this of us.Mountain Lion CompatibleScrivener is now compatible with OS X 10.8, or “Mountain Lion”, this includes anofficial Developer ID, which will allow Scrivener to run under GateKeeper. In addi-tion to compatibility fixes, there are a few new features in 10.8 that we take advantageof: l You can easily share your daily session goal via Twitter using the new icon in the Project Targets panel. l If Growl isn’t installed, target notifications will use Notification Center. l Quick Look gestures (three-finger taps by default) on the binder, corkboard, outliner, synopsis search results or references lists bring up a QuickReference or Quick Look panel for the tapped item.Additional ChangesTo see a full list of changes, visit the full release notes web page1 .New in 2.2Record Audio and Camera SnapshotsAudio notes and pictures can be taken (on Macs with an iSight camera) and auto-matically organised in the binder. Audio notes can be made while you work, usinga recorder window which can be set off to the side and paused and resumed at will.Read more (section 21.4).Custom Meta-Data RevampedUntil now, custom meta-data has had its home in a small little panel, hidden behindthe general meta-data which shows you the status, label, and other basic information.Many people didn’t even know there are more stuff behind that panel. Custom meta-data now has its own dedicated inspector pane, with easy to read & edit text fieldsdisplayed in a linear stack, rather than a small grid. Custom meta-data fields can alsobe shown as columns in the outliner. If this all sounds interesting and new to you,read more about Custom Meta-Data (subsection 10.1.6).Default Subdocument TypesAssign one of your document templates to any container in the binder. New itemscreated within that container will be set to use that template instead of the default 1 http://www.literatureandlatte.com/scrivChangeList.php
  18. 18. 11empty file. Make easy to-do lists, quickly generate character profiles, or fill out refer-ence tables for research you are gathering. Read more (subsection 8.4.4).Additional ChangesHere are some new tweaks to existing tools that you might find helpful: l Linked comments and footnotes can now be moved by dragging them from the inspector into the text editor. Where you drop is where they will be referenced from. You can still use the existing method of pre-selecting a range of text and right-clicking the note to move it. l Session goals have been expanded to include more options. There is a night owl feature that resets after a natural day, rather than strictly going by the clock. You can also have Scrivener act like it used to, and reset whenever you close the project, or just opt to never automatically reset the session goal and handle it yourself. l The custom icon menu has been re-organised. The last ten icons you’ve used will now be saved at the top of the menu for convenience. Icons that are similar in appearance or function can now be grouped together into sets. l For workflows that require the final document to consist of one long table, such as some documentary scripts, there are now options to stitch together adjacent tables when compiling. This way you can take advantage of Scrivener’s powerful outlining and section features while still producing the single table document you need. l Keeping Scrivener Links up to date in spite of section title revisions has been a manual task. Now you can select broad ranges of text and update all Scrivener Links within that range so that their text is updated with the binder titles of the items they individually point to. As usual, there are too many changes to list here. To see a full list, visit the fullrelease notes web page2 .New in 2.1MathType IntegrationThose who need to work with equations will be pleased to find that Scrivener2.1 now offers integration with MathType, the premier equation editing and type-setting software by Design Science3 . Adding equations is now as simple as using 2 http://www.literatureandlatte.com/scrivChangeList.php 3 http://www.dessci.com/en/products/mathtype/
  19. 19. 12 CHAPTER 3. WHAT’S NEWEdit Insert MathType Equation.Once added to your draft, you can double-clickat any time on the equation to open it for editing.Compile Summary ModeThe Compile feature has always been one of the richest areas of Scrivener 2.1, andalso carries with it some of the most complex parts of the program. In the past, if youwanted to compile you either had to be happy with one of the pre-built formats, ordive into the full advanced interface. The new Compile Summary Mode (section 3)expands the basic compile view, adding crucial and commonly needed options. Evenif you already know how to use the compiler, you may find Summary mode to be ofgreater convenience for once involved tasks, like changing the font of a preset fromone style to another.Quick Find by SynopsisQuickly searching for items in the Binder is now easier with the Find Synopsis (sub-section 21.1.4) tool. This window features a search engine which gathers results as youtype, and quick access to the index card or graphic for any of these results. Use thistool to quickly find items by name or synopsis text, jot down notes in the synopsistext, or as a tool to locate and load items, without disturbing your current workingarea.Colour ThemesIn the past you’ve been able to save out your preferences to a file, and so by using thatyou could save different colour sets as “themes”. However this had a drawback in thatit saved all of your preferences in that file, not just the appearance settings. Now youcan save just appearance settings using the same Manage... menu from the Preferencewindow. Themes let you switch colour sets with ease, so you could for example use abrighter Composition theme during the day, and switch to a darker theme at night.Composition ModeWell all right, this isn’t a new feature, but we thought you should know that whatwe’ve been calling “Full Screen” all this time is now called “Composition Mode”.Why? In short, Mac OS X Lion happened along, and as you may know, the phrase“full screen” is destined to become a phrase that most Mac users associate with a par-ticular feature: expanding the application to fit the display—not completely changingthe interface into something else. So Scrivener now has two different features formaximisation. Full Screen works like most other programs in Mac OS X Lion (andwon’t be available in older version of the OS), while Composition Mode is the samedistraction-free writing interface you’ve grown familiar with.
  20. 20. 13Full Screen for Lion[10.7+ (Lion) Only] For those who have upgraded to Mac OS X Lion (10.7), thenew full screen feature has been adopted by Scrivener, giving you another alternativeworking mode where the standard project window can take up the entire screen. Thisis in addition to the familiar full screen editing mode, which has been renamed toComposition Mode. There are two ways to access this new feature: using the menucommand (View Enter Full Screen) or window button along the top4 , or by using asaved Layout that has been created in full screen mode. In the latter method, you cancreate special full screen layouts (such as nothing but a huge corkboard) and easilyaccess them with the Layouts feature. To promote this, the Layouts toolbar buttonhas been added to the default set, and the Layouts menu itself now occupies its ownplace in the Window menu, rather than being buried in the View menu as before.Data ExportTwo new export features have been added to better allow exporting to spreadsheetapplications and outliners, using common standards for doing so. For spreadsheets,you can now export any Outliner view to CSV (you can choose between comma, tab,or semi-colon separators). This can, if you wish, be a full output of every possiblecolumn, or just the columns you have visible in the Outliner. For applications basedon structural hierarchies, like dedicated outliners, you can now export to OPML.New in 2.0Freeform CorkboardsThe corkboard feature has always been another way to view and rearrange the orderof your book by placing it into a familiar metaphor. Scrivener 2 takes the metaphorthe rest of the way. Now you can view a freeform corkboard for your sections wherecards can be moved around arbitrarily, allowing the right brain to visualise your bookin new ways. If you decide to commit the new order into the binder outline, youcan do so with the press of a button. For more information, read The Corkboard(section 12.1).CollectionsCollections add tabs to your binder, giving you the ability to collect groups of doc-uments together without moving them from their original position. It’s a bit likemaking groups of aliases, without all of the fuss. You could create a tab to collect 4 The new conventional shortcut for this feature across many applications is – F, whichScrivener now uses to enter and exit Lion’s full screen mode. Previously, this was used by ProjectSearch (subsection 21.1.2), which has had its shortcut changed to F.The new conventional short-cut for this feature across many applications is – F, which Scrivener now uses to enter and exitLion’s full screen mode. Previously, this was used by Project Search (subsection 21.1.2), which has hadits shortcut changed to F.
  21. 21. 14 CHAPTER 3. WHAT’S NEWall of the sections your editor has marked as being too verbose, then remove themfrom the collection as you trim them down. Create another tab to store all of thedocuments that still need citations. Build smart collections that automatically lookfor search terms every time you view the tab. For more information, read UsingCollections (section 8.3).MarginaliaNow you get a choice between using in-line annotations and footnotes or placing yournotes into a new panel located in the inspector. This not only lets you place longnotes out of the way of the primary draft, it also works as a bookmarking system.Clicking on the notes in the inspector column will automatically scroll your editorto its linked position in the document. This is especially useful in Scrivenings view,where you can see all of the notes for the collected documents at once. Your oldprojects will upgrade using the in-line system as they always have, but you can easilyconvert to the new system with a single menu command, or vice-versa. For moreinformation, read Annotations and Footnotes (chapter 18).Improved CompileFor most Scrivener authors, compile is the last crucial step where all of your hardwork is bound together into a single document. It lets you write in a way that is com-fortable for you, while quickly generating a format that is comfortable for your editoror agent. Scrivener 2 recognises the importance of this process and has increased itsabilities in nearly every facet. Now you can design export instructions which auto-matically title and number your chapters for you; insert custom separators betweentypes of documents; filter compile according to meta-data or other criteria; and ex-port to more formats, including ePub and WebArchive, with even better Final Draftsupport. Compile now takes your export format into account and reduces the com-plexity of the options provided accordingly. For more information, read Compilingthe Draft (chapter 24).iPad Workflow SupportWhile the iPhone and iPod touch gave people a taste of mobile writing, the iPadhas made this more practical. In response, 2.0 features integration with the popularSimplenote and Index Card for iPad, as well as the ability to synchronise parts of yourproject text with an external folder full of files. In combination with a file-sharingservice like Dropbox5 , this latter feature provides integration with many plain-texteditors on the iPad and can also be used as a collaboration tool. To read more aboutthese new features, see Cloud Integration and Sharing (chapter 13). 5 Dropbox is a free tool that lets you keep a folder synchronised between all of your computers.For more information, visit the Dropbox homepage6
  22. 22. 15Better View IntegrationThe relationship between corkboard, outliner, and editor was, for many, a stumblingblock when learning Scrivener. A lot of thought has gone into making this rela-tionship more intuitive. You no longer have to worry about choosing between EditScrivenings (now called Scrivenings) and other view modes or setting preferences tochange the behaviour of clicking on items in the binder. Whatever group view modeyou used last is what Scrivener will use the next time, and switching among the viewsis now more seamless. The toolbar buttons for selecting modes have been refinedto make it clearer that you are changing the way you view a binder item and/or itschildren items.QuickReference WindowsSince there are occasions when it is fruitful to have more than two documents open atonce, Scrivener now provides a QuickReference panel. It’s a bit like Finder’s QuickLook, except unlike Quick Look, you can actually edit the content and have multiplepanels open at once. You can even split the QuickReference panel and edit nearlyanything in the second pane that would ordinarily require the inspector to be open.QuickReference panels can also be used while working in composition mode. Formore information on how to use QuickReference panels, read QuickReference (sec-tion 21.2).Snapshots and ChangesTaking snapshots of your documents as you work has always been a crucial safety netin Scrivener, but Scrivener 1 just gave you a list of snapshots in a window and madeyou do the work of figuring out what had changed and which snapshot was which.Snapshots have now been moved into the inspector, meaning you can view themright alongside your current version. They can even be loaded into the editor itselfas a read-only reference. You can also now ask Scrivener to mark changes betweenrevisions, and it will highlight new words and overstrike deleted words for you. Formore information, read Snapshots Pane (subsection 19.3.5).Automatic BackupsTo keep your work safe, you can now tell Scrivener to automatically back up yourprojects as you work. There are a number of ways in which to do so: opening andclosing the project, and manual saves. Tell Scrivener to use your Dropbox folder forautomatic backups, and never worry about keeping all of your machines up to date.You can still make manual backups using the File Menu as before.Document TemplatesBefore, if you wrote a template character sheet, reference page, and so on, you hadto make sure to remember to duplicate the original and then move the copy to the
  23. 23. 16 CHAPTER 3. WHAT’S NEWright spot. Now you can set up a template folder which will automatically place itscontained documents in an easy-to-use menu from which they can be inserted intoyour draft wherever you want them. Document templates will be clearly markedwith a special icon in the binder. For more information, read Document Templates(section 8.4).Page ViewDisplay your work in a variety of visual page formats, including single-page, two-page side by side, and custom page sizes. While not intended to replace your wordprocessor or layout program, Page Layout preview will give you a rough idea of howmany pages your sections are. This will be of considerable use to scriptwriters andappreciated by others who prefer to work in a page-based method or just prefer theaesthetic appeal of seeing virtual pages scrolling by.3.0.1 Hundreds of Other ImprovementsOften when a new product version says hundreds of new improvements, you knowthey are counting each and every change, including bugs fixes. Scrivener 2 actuallydoes have hundreds of improvements, far too many to realistically list. You’ll noticemost of the refinements as you go about working in the way you’ve grown accus-tomed to. Here are just a few of the new things you can do. Binder Favourites: Set documents or folders as “favourites” and they’ll get pinnedto various document selection menus in the interface, such as Go To and ScrivenerLinks. Text Bookmarks: Set bookmarks in the text of your document to mark places ofinterest for quick navigation. Bookmarks use the existing inline annotation feature,so they’re easy to spot while you work and omit when you publish. New Style System: Apple’s built-in style system has been completely replacedwith an improved style builder and selection mechanism. It is important to notethat Scrivener styles are still a way of applying favourite formatting rules and fontvariations, not dynamic styles in the sense of a word processor, but the system formaintaining and creating these has become much easier. Refined Menu Layout: Much thought has been put into storing the vast numberof functions available. The new menus have been re-arranged to be more intuitiveand logical. Preferences Overhauled: More control is available, letting you personalise yourcopy of Scrivener even further, and the sections have been re-arranged to be morelogical and accessible. Better Keywords: Keywords are now stored centrally for each project and can beassigned colours which you can choose to display on index cards in the corkboard.This raises the visibility of keywords, making them more useful when viewing largegroups of documents together.
  24. 24. 17 Custom Binder Icons: Create or import your own custom icons and assign themto documents and folders in the binder. Project Specific Formatting Preferences: In addition to the global applicationediting formatting preferences, you can now set each project to have special format-ting defaults. Improved Project Templates: Creating a new project is now even easier. Scrivenercomes loaded with a number of useful starter templates, and it is even simpler to makeyour own and sort them using the new topical category system. New Index Card Appearance: In addition to the Scrivener 1 index card styles, thenew Rounded theme gives both the card and the “pins” an entirely new look. Revision Marking: Set up revision marking “pens” that automatically colour newtext according to the revision number as you type it in. New Format Search: You can now search by a wide collection of format-basedcriteria. You can look for all italic or bold texts, search by revision markings orhighlights, find inline annotations, and more. Titles in Scrivenings: Display and edit the titles of documents right in the editorwhile working in Scrivenings. Integrated Title and Synopsis in Outliner: The outliner no longer requires asecond column to show both the Title and Synopsis; they are now displayed in a singleintegrated column, familiar to users of outlining tools like OmniOutliner, giving youmore space for other columns. View Enclosing Group: It’s now easy to jump up in the hierarchy from where youare currently editing, using the current view mode. If working with corkboards, youcan view the corkboard “above” the current one in the outline structure, for example,or if when working with a section of the draft in Scrivenings mode, you can broadenthe scope of your text editor to include the texts around it. Expanded Scratch Pad: The Scratch Pad has been modified to work better as anout-board research collection tool. You can now store any number of notes, and thesewill be saved as accessible RTFD files right on your disk. You can also easily transfernotes to any of your open projects. Optimised Text Engine: Snow Leopard introduced changes in the way text is ren-dered; Scrivener 2 has been optimised to better work with these changes, improvingperformance when working with large documents. Character Name Generator: Authors of fiction will be pleased to find that a pow-erful name generator has been built into the application. You can supply it with awide range of criteria, including ethnic background; gender; forenames, surnames, orboth; even alliteration. Scrivener also gives you the ability to add your own customname lists. Store Any Kind of File: You can now drag and store any type of file into yourbinder and load it in an external editor that supports that file type. Unlike references,
  25. 25. 18 CHAPTER 3. WHAT’S NEWthese files will be stored in your project, turning it into a hub for all your file types. Composition Backdrop: Now you can customise your composition experienceby choosing images from your hard drive. Improved Navigation: New keyboard shortcuts let you traverse the binder fromright within the editor session. No more switching back and forth between binderand editor to select the next document. Expanded Export Features: More of your work can now be saved when using theExport feature, including all of your document snapshots. Multiple Project Notepads: Project notes can still be accessed in the inspector,but now you can also load them in a separate window, letting you view both yourdocument notes and project notes at the same time. You can add new tabs to theproject notes window to create multiple notepads, and these will be accessible fromthe inspector as well. Format Bar: The slim new format bar collects the most common formatting toolsinto a single, compact space above the editor. No more hunting around in menusor messing with font palettes. The margin and tab stop ruler has been separated andsimplified, allowing you to show only the tools you need.
  26. 26. Chapter 4 Installation and UpgradingIf you purchased Scrivener through the Mac App Store, then this chapter will notbe relevant to you, as it pertains to the registration, installation, and maintenanceof the standard retail version. You may safely skip to the next chapter, Interface(chapter 5). All installation and application updates will be handled by the Mac AppStore application for you. If you purchased the boxed version of Scrivener, insert the CD-ROM into yourcomputer and wait for it to appear in the Finder. Create a new Finder window with – N and choose the Go Applications... menu item. Drag the Scrivener applicationfrom the CD to your Applications folder. For online downloadable purchases, download the trial version from the Literature& Latte web site. The trial version can be unlocked at any time with the registrationserial number that was sent to you when you purchased the application. When theDMG finishes downloading, double-click on it in the Finder (if it hasn’t opened foryou automatically), and follow the above instructions to drag the Scrivener icon toyour Applications folder. Scrivener will not be correctly installed on your system if you drag the icon fromeither the CD, or the DMG, straight into the Dock. It must be dragged into theApplications folder or, if you do not have administrative rights for the computer, youmay install it into an Applications folder within your home folder (you can createone, if necessary). After copying the Scrivener application to your hard drive, youcan then drag a copy to the Dock from the Applications folder if you wish. If you attempt to run Scrivener from a “non-standard” location, you will get awarning message which will offer to you the chance to have it install it for you. Ifyou intend to run Scrivener from outside of an Applications folder, then you shouldcheck the box that will inhibit this warning from appearing again in the future. Once this is complete, you should eject the DMG or CD from your computer.Click the Scrivener icon in the Dock (if you have placed it there), or double-click theicon in the Applications folder to launch Scrivener.4.1 Portable InstallationsWe do not recommend installing Scrivener on a portable drive that you routinelyremove from your computer in order to keep your data portable between multiple 19
  27. 27. 20 CHAPTER 4. INSTALLATION AND UPGRADINGmachines. It is best to install and register Scrivener on each machine independently.4.2 Registering4.2.1 The Trial VersionYou can try out all of the features of Scrivener for 30 non-consecutive days withouthaving to pay or register. During that period, Scrivener will be fully functional.After 30 days of use, you will no longer be able to access Scrivener at all1 unlessyou register. If you are getting close to the end of your trial and have decided tonot purchase Scrivener, please skip forward to the sections on Compiling the Draft(chapter 24) and Exporting (chapter 25), for details on getting your data out of theprogram.4.2.2 Purchasing ScrivenerDuring the trial period, whenever you launch Scrivener, you will be reminded of howmany trial days you have left and given the option of buying and registering. Clickingon the Buy Online button will take you to the Literature & Latte online store, whereyou can purchase a licence for Scrivener. You can also visit the online store at anytime whilst using Scrivener with the Help Purchase Scrivener... menu item. If you are reading the paper copy of this manual, you probably already have aScrivener serial number in the box. When you buy a licence for Scrivener online, you will be e-mailed your uniqueserial number, which will have the following format2 : SCRVNR001-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX Make sure that you keep this serial number, along with the exact name under whichyou registered Scrivener (the “Serial Number Name”), in a safe place, as you willneed both to register Scrivener again in the future. Remember that you may needto re-register at a later date, too—for instance when installing Scrivener on a newcomputer, or re-installing after wiping your hard drive for whatever reason—so it isvery important to store this information safely. If you have lost your serial number, clicking Retrieve Lost Serial... in the registrationwindow will take you to our vendor’s self-service support site, where you can requestto have the information sent to you. 1 Actually, Scrivener will allow you a single “grace” session after the 30 days so that you can exportall of your work. This way, if you have decided not to buy Scrivener but forgot to export during the30 days, you can still easily get your work out of the program. 2 The number in the first block may be something other than ‘1’, this is okay. However if yournumber is ‘0’ you have an old serial number and will need to upgrade.
  28. 28. 4.3. APPLICATION UPDATES 214.2.3 Registering ScrivenerAfter purchasing a licence and receiving your unique serial number, you can registerScrivener by clicking on the Enter License... button in the “Scrivener is unregistered!”box that appears whenever you launch Scrivener. Alternatively, you can choose Reg-ister... from the application (Scrivener) menu. In the “User Name” box of the registration window, enter the exact name underwhich you registered Scrivener (referred to as the “Serial Number Name” in the e-mail you received with your registration details). Enter your unique serial number inthe “Registration Code” box, then click the Register button. You must make sure thatboth the user name and serial number are exactly as they appear in the registratione-mail you received, or registration will fail. If you receive a message stating that the name or serial number is invalid: l Check and make sure they are in the right order. The name of the software owner should be in the top field; the serial number in the second field l Try using copy and paste to transfer the information from the e-mail to this form and make sure that when you select the text in the e-mail, that the selection range does not extend beyond the first or last letter or number in the field. For this reason, it is probably best to copy and paste both the user name and se-rial number directly from your e-mail. Be sure to select only the text and not anyadditional white space. After clicking the registration button, Scrivener will attempt to authenticate yourcopy over the Internet. No private information will be relayed during this. If forsome reason the Internet cannot be accessed from your computer, you will receive awarning message with instructions on how to activate the software. A URL will beprovided which you can use on another computer to access the activation code you’llneed to complete the registration process on the original computer. You can use copyand paste into the forms to make this easy. Once Scrivener has been registered, you can begin using it immediately. There willno longer be a time limit on its use and you will no longer see the nag box at startup.4.3 Application UpdatesWhen you first start using Scrivener, you will be presented with a panel which askswhether or not Scrivener should automatically check for updates. To use this feature,you must have a connection to the Internet. Software vs. Your Work: The advent of the iOS operating system, upon which iPhones and iPads run, has unfortunately blurred the line between what a program
  29. 29. 22 CHAPTER 4. INSTALLATION AND UPGRADING is and what your data is. On these devices, deleting or re-installing an application can destroy your work. Computers don’t work that way. They are considerably more robust and well designed for content creators down to the very core of their technology and phi- losophy. Like all programs on your computer, Scrivener saves your work into files. You’ll learn more about the specifics of this in the coming sections, but for now simply know that there is absolutely no connection between the software and your hard work. Upgrading versions, registering your trial, or switching to a beta build will have no impact on your data (save that you of course will not be able to open it so long as Scrivener is not installed; it will be accessible once the software is available again). If you click Check Automatically, once a day when you launch Scrivener, if yourmachine is connected to the internet, Scrivener will do a quick check to see if there is anewer version available and will prompt you to update if one is found. (It is stronglyrecommended that you always update to the newest version available.) ChoosingDon’t Check will disable automatic checks, but you can always manually select Checkfor Updates... from the application (Scrivener) menu. This option is available even ifyou also have Scrivener checking automatically. You can change your mind later by setting this option in the application prefer-ences, under the General tab (section B.2). There you can also adjust the frequency ofthe automatic checks, ranging from hourly to monthly. When a check finds available updates, a window will appear outlining the detailsof the upgrade. It is recommended you brief yourself with the update notes, as some-times changes in operation occur. You can view the full list of changes at any time onour web site3 . To upgrade the application, click the Install Update button. Scrivener will down-load the latest version of the application for you, and when it is done downloadingyou will be presented with a button to restart the program. Click this, and afterScrivener restarts your copy will be up to date.4.4 Upgrading from Scrivener 1While it is possible to run more than one version of Scrivener at once on your com-puter, it is advisable to first delete your copy of 1.x before installing the new version.To do this, make sure Scrivener is closed, then drag its icon from the Applicationsfolder to the trash in your Dock before following the above installation instructions.Since the application preferences have all been updated, you will need to go throughthe new preference system and set up your defaults again. 3 http://www.literatureandlatte.com/scrivChangeList.php
  30. 30. 4.4. UPGRADING FROM SCRIVENER 1 23 The project file format has been updated considerably, and new or upgradedprojects cannot be opened in Scrivener 1.x versions of the application. The first timeyou load each of your older projects in 2.x, you will be presented with a dialoguebox asking if you wish to upgrade the project format. Until you do so, it will notbe possible to open these older projects in Scrivener 2.x. When updating the project,Scrivener will create a backup copy of the original project, preserved in the 1.x for-mat, which you can choose to back up or delete once you’ve verified the update wassuccessful. Once the update process is complete, the project will open and you can begin work-ing immediately. Updating large projects: When updating very large, multi-gigabyte projects, be prepared to wait a while for the process to complete. A good rule of thumb is how long it would take to copy the project from one disk to another and then half that time again. If your project is so large that it will take 20 minutes to copy, then you should be prepared to wait at least a half hour for the project to update, as part of the update process is creating a backup of the original. You will also want to keep this fact in mind when considering drive space. Do not attempt to update a multi-gigabyte project file on a drive that does not have enough space left on it to accommodate a duplicated copy. In some cases, you may need to keep a copy of 1.x installed. If you are workingwith a colleague who has yet to upgrade to version 2, you will want to make sure notto update these collaborative projects and will need to use 1.x to interface with them.It is perfectly safe to do so, but if you elect to keep a copy of Scrivener 1.x installed,you will need to consider the following: l .scriv files will open in Scrivener 2.x by default. To open older projects in Scrivener 1.x, you will need to drag these items onto the Scrivener 1.x icon in the Dock or use the File Open... menu command from within Scrivener 1.x. l So long as you have both versions installed, the Mac might get confused over the clipping services, which can be used to clip information from other programs into Scrivener. Once you have fully uninstalled the old version of Scrivener, these clipping services should work just fine after a reboot. l It is safe to run both copies at once, as they use different preference files. l Scrivener’s manual has been entirely moved to PDF (what you are likely read- ing). If you leave 1.x installed on your machine, the old Apple Help system will still have entries listed for Scrivener, so if you use the Help menu’s search field (in Snow Leopard) to look up a topic, it will return search results from the
  31. 31. 24 CHAPTER 4. INSTALLATION AND UPGRADING wrong version’s help. Instead, load the PDF in your preferred viewer and use the search tool there to find a topic. l In some cases custom keyboard shortcuts, which are assigned using Apple’s Keyboard Shortcuts tool, can get assigned incorrectly or lost.4.5 Staying InformedIf you would like to keep up to date on the latest developments and releases ofScrivener, you can sign up for our low-volume newsletter using Help Keep Up toDate.... Once you submit the form, a confirmation e-mail will be sent to the addressyou provided. You will need to click a link within this e-mail before you will be of-ficially added to the list. If you cannot find the confirmation e-mail after 24 hours,check your spam folders, and consider adding “literatureandlatte.com” to your white-list. The “Keep Up to Date. . . ” window also links to our Twitter feed and Facebookpage. We frequently publish small tricks and tips through these channels.
  32. 32. Chapter 5 InterfaceThe Scrivener interface has been carefully designed to cover a wide range of uses. Atits most minimal, the interface could look no more complicated than a basic wordprocessor like TextEdit. In this section, we will go over some of the basic interfaceelements that will be present in nearly every project you work in. Advanced featureswill be gradually introduced in their own sections as they pertain to specific areas ofthe writing process.5.1 Interface OverviewWhen you initially run Scrivener, you will be presented with a Getting Started andproject template selection window. This is actually a full-featured launching pad forall for all of your future and existing projects. Whenever you are ready to start a newproject (the details of which you’ll read about later on), such as a new novel or paperfor a journal, you’ll use this interface to select a starting template, or a blank starter.You can hide the “Getting Started” interface in the Options... drop-down menu in thebottom of this window. The remainder of this section briefly summarises the main components of a typicalproject window. Each area will be discussed in greater detail later on, and if youare interested in a particular feature you’ll find cross-references to more exhaustivearticles on these topics. You may want to click on the “Blank” category in the leftlist, and then use the “Blank” starter to create a temporary test project to play aroundwith, while reading this chapter. Skip forward to the Quick Tour (chapter 6) if youneed instructions for doing so, but come back after you make a project, as it assumesa basic understanding of what we will cover in this chapter. The main project interface comprises five main elements, not all of which are visi-ble when a new project is created. 1. Toolbar: Frequently used tools displayed in a standard fashion, familiar to most Mac OS X applications, which can be customised as you see fit. 2. Binder: A hierarchal list of all items in your project, including the manuscript; a general collection area for research materials, notes, and so forth; a trash can for collecting deleted items; and finally the top-level area where you can create your own files and folders. 25
  33. 33. 26 CHAPTER 5. INTERFACE Figure 5.1: The Basic Interface 3. Format Bar: Supplies frequently used text editing and formatting tools, avail- able to both editor splits. 4. Editor: The editor can be split into two panes which can show two parts of the same document, or two different items altogether. This is where all viewing and editing is done. 5. Inspector: A feature-packed tool providing information about the currently active split. The inspector has six separate sub-panes, which address various aspects of the viewed resources. Not all of them are available for all media types. Most of the main interface sections (binder, editors, and inspector) can be resizedwithin the window via the grab handles located at the bottom, or in the case of splits,
  34. 34. 5.1. INTERFACE OVERVIEW 27by dragging the divider line between them. Each of these elements will now be explained in greater detail.5.1.1 ToolbarScrivener has a customisable toolbar which includes many common functions, in-cluding a project search tool. To change the order, add, or remove icons, use theView Customize Toolbar... menu item. It is also possible to hide the toolbar by using the View Hide Toolbar menu item.Note that when the toolbar is hidden, you can still access project search via theEdit Find sub-menu, or F, which will provide a pop-up window featuring thesame search controls available as on the toolbar.5.1.2 The BinderThe binder is so-called because it really acts as the ring-binder for your project. Itprovides a hierarchical list of all items in your project. You can drag items aroundto restructure your project and double-click on any item to rename it. Selecting anitem in the binder displays its content in the editor pane that most recently had thekeyboard focus (see below) and its meta-data in the Inspector (again, see below). You can create as many folders and files as you wish in the binder, but there willalways be three top-level folders that cannot be deleted (although they can be movedaround within the top level and renamed):Draft The Draft folder is where you place all of the pieces of text you want to include in your final manuscript. As such, the Draft folder is unique in that it can only hold text files and folders—it cannot directly hold image files, PDF files, QuickTime media or web pages as other folders can, though it is of course perfectly possible to embed figures into the text itself, much as you would in a word processor, at the editor level. All of the writing you want as part of your finished work should be placed inside the Draft folder, in the order you want it (which, of course, is easy to change by dragging and dropping). When you are ready to export or print your manuscript, use File Compile.... This will combine all of the individual documents inside the Draft folder into one long document, formatted as you specify. Each file you place inside the Draft may represent a chapter, a scene, a paragraph or whatever you want. Some templates will have renamed this folder to something else, but its function remains the same.Research The Research folder can hold any type of file supported by Scrivener (text, image, media, web archive or PDF files). It provides a default place for non-text files to be imported and stored (although you can create other top-level folders for this purpose if you so wish).
  35. 35. 28 CHAPTER 5. INTERFACE Some templates will have renamed this folder to something else, but its function remains the same.Trash When you delete an item from the binder, it is not really deleted but just moved to the Trash folder. You can drag items in the Trash folder back into the main binder, but you cannot create new items inside the Trash. To empty the Trash, use the Project Empty Trash... menu command. This will permanently delete all items inside the Trash folder (and cannot be undone). The Collection tab interface can be toggled on and off with the associated toolbarbutton, or the View Collections Show Collections menu item. You can organisematerial into tabs you create, or save common searches as dynamic collection. Inmost cases, if this manual refers to having a “binder selection”, it is often accurate toassume that applies to collections and search results as well. Collections and searchresults can also be dismissed by clicking the X button in the footer bar for the Binder.Due to the similarity of these views, the entire sidebar is often referred to in thismanual as “the binder sidebar”. This is meant to indicate that you needn’t take thereferenced action only in the Binder tab itself, but in any view that presents itself inthis sidebar, such as the Search Results lists. See Also: l Setting Up the Binder (chapter 8) l Navigating and Organising (chapter 9)5.1.3 Format BarThe Format Bar stretches across the top of the main application view, right belowthe toolbar, and provides easy access to the most common text formatting tools. Itcan be selectively hidden when not needed with the Format Hide Format Bar menucommand. For more information, read The Format Bar (subsection 15.4.2).5.1.4 EditorThe main editor occupies the large space to the right of the Binder, and will be yourmain working area for all manner of tasks. It automatically loads whenever you clickan item in the Binder. Not only is it where you will be doing most of your writing,but it also has the ability to display groups of selected items in various useful fashions,which we will be getting in to shortly, and is a capable multimedia viewer, too. Theeditor will take on different appearances and functions depending on what sort ofdocument you are displaying and which group view mode you are in. The editor canalso be split, either vertically or horizontally, giving you two independent workingareas at once.
  36. 36. 5.1. INTERFACE OVERVIEW 29 At the top of each editor is a “header bar”. This contains navigation buttons (thearrows) which allow you to navigate backwards and forwards through the documenthistory. Next to the navigation button pair is the title of the document along withits icon. Clicking on the icon will display a pop-up menu that collects together somecommon menu commands. The entire header bar has three colour status modes: l Plain grey is the default, and is what you will see unless you have split the editor. l Blue appears when you have split editors, and indicates the active editor. l Mauve appears when the editor has been locked ( – L), which inhibits it from receiving binder clicks. On the right side are two vertical arrows which allow you to navigate through thebinder in a flat list fashion. You can also use the keyboard shortcuts, – UpArrowand – DownArrow. Using these navigation tools will also focus the binder on whatyou are selecting (and is one of the few instances in which an action taken in the editorwill change the Binder selection). On the far right of the header view is a button that controls the split. The icon inthe button will indicate the type of split that is available - horizontal, vertical or none(close split). Option-clicking on this button will change the split type. Clicking on this button when both editors are visible will cause the editor associ-ated with that Header Bar to take over and the other editor to close. Below each editor pane is a Footer Bar. This will change depending on the typeof document visible and the current editor mode. When a standard text document isbeing viewed, for instance, it will display the word and character count along with apop-up button for changing the text scale and a button for setting document targets.In scriptwriting mode, it will provide shortcuts for accessing various script entrymacros. Various types of multimedia, and PDF, will display their own appropriaterelevant information in the footer bar. Corkboard and Outliner group view modeshave their own footer bar functions, too. See Also: l View Modes (section 5.2): for further information on the various group and text view modes available. l Viewing Media in the Editor (section 14.3): for details on how various read-only media are displayed in the editor. l Header Bar (section 14.1): for more information on the informative strip along the top of the editor. l Footer Bar (section 14.2): on how to use the strip along the bottom of the editor, which will change according to what type of document you are viewing.
  37. 37. 30 CHAPTER 5. INTERFACE5.1.5 The InspectorThe Inspector is not always visible by default in new projects, but will always beon the right side of the project window when it is visible. Its purpose is to displayall meta-data associated with the document shown in the editor pane that most wasrecently viewed in either editor. Note that the special top-level folders in the binder—Draft, Research and Trash—have no meta-data associated with them, and thereforethe inspector just shows the project notes or references when these items are selected.More on that later; for now, if the inspector appears suspiciously empty, know youhave an item selected that does not support meta-data. The inspector has six different sub-panels, which can all be accessed via buttonsalong the very bottom of the Inspector. If an associated panel has had data enteredinto it, an asterisk will appear in the upper-right corner of the button. The sub-panesare listed in the order they appear: 1. Synopsis, General and Notes 2. Synopsis, General and References 3. Synopsis, General and Keywords 4. Synopsis, General, and Custom Meta-data 5. Snapshots 6. Linked Text Notes The lock icon at the end locks the inspector so that you can reference the materialin it even when switching to a different editor split. The first three sub-panes include the synopsis card, and general meta-data in addi-tion to their specialised information. These initial sections can be collapsed by click-ing the disclosure arrow on the left side of the header bar for each. The two commonmeta-data sections are as follows:Synopsis & Image The top frame shows either the synopsis for the binder item, which is what also appears in the index card representation of the item in cork- board mode, among other places. Using the top drop-down menu, you can optionally also attach an image to the item to represent it in Corkboard mode, instead of a text synopsis. Media files by default will display an image synopsis, but you can use the drop-down menu to switch to text if you prefer.General & Custom Meta-Data The middle frame of the inspector shows basic meta-data for the current document. This includes the label and status (which can be renamed to something more appropriate to the current project), the modified and created date of the document (click on the arrows to switch
  38. 38. 5.1. INTERFACE OVERVIEW 31 between the modified and created date) and checkboxes that affect how (and whether) the document will appear as part of the compiled draft for exporting or printing. Click on the header bar to switch between general and custom meta-data, which can be set up for each project. For more information on the types of meta-data available, read Setting Up Meta-Data (chapter 10). The Notes, References, Custom Meta-data and Keywords panels all display theabove two components. They are described as follows:Notes Displays a notepad for the document. Each document has an auxiliary notepad associated with it; it only appears while you are viewing that item. Clicking the header bar of the notes area will bring up a pop-up menu from which you can select “Document Notes” or “Project Notes”, the latter of which is global to the project and accessible from any part of the project. If you have multiple project notepads, you may see more than one option here in parenthesis. For more information, read Document and Project Notes (subsec- tion 19.3.1).References The References table lets you to hold links to related material within the project itself. Links can also point elsewhere on your hard drive or on the Internet. Click the header bar to switch between document references and global project references. Use the latter to make links available throughout the project. For more information, read References (subsection 19.3.2).Keywords Displays a list of keywords associated with the selected document. Key- words can be used to tag your document. Use the + and - buttons to add and remove keywords, or the gear menu to access the project’s central keyword list. Read more about them in Keywords Pane (subsection 19.3.3) and Using Key- words (subsection 10.1.4).Custom Meta-Data Each custom meta-data field will be displayed in a linear list with editable text fields. Fields can be added and managed using the gear menu. The fields can also be added to the Outliner as columns. Read more about Custom Meta-Data (subsection 10.1.6) and the Custom Meta-Data Pane (sub- section 19.3.4). The last two sub-panes, Snapshots and Comments & Footnotes, take up the entireinspector.Snapshots An integrated view which displays all of the document’s snapshots and the contents of the selected snapshot in the text area below. Snapshots can be created (from the state of the current text) or deleted with the + and - buttons in the header bar. The Compare button will show changes between the selected
  39. 39. 32 CHAPTER 5. INTERFACE snapshot and the current text. The Roll Back button lets you revert the main editor to an older version of the text. For more information on using this, see Snapshots Pane (subsection 19.3.5), and Using Snapshots (section 15.5) for more general information on Snapshots.Comments & Footnotes Words and phrases in the text editor can have notes at- tached to them. The contents of the notes will be stored in this pane. New comments can be created with the + button and new footnotes with the +fn but- ton. Selected notes can be deleted with the - button. For more information, see Linked Notes Pane (subsection 19.3.6), and Annotations and Footnotes (chap- ter 18).5.2 View ModesThere are three primary “group view modes” available in Scrivener. View modes giveyou a powerful way to view and modify multiple documents at once in a variety offashions, each tailored to different tasks. View modes are generally only triggeredwhen the editor is asked to view more than one document at a time. This can happenif you Cmd-click on more than one binder item or even if you just click on a folder.It is also possible to manually enable a view mode, allowing you to easily flesh out asingle document with new index cards beneath it. For the most part, Scrivener will anticipate what you are trying to do and reactaccordingly. If you click on a single text file, it will display the contents of that text filein the editor. If you then click on the group containing that file, it will automaticallyswitch to your preferred group view mode, the one which you used last (corkboardby default). An exception to this rule is when the view mode has been explicitly set to singletext file mode. If you intentionally disable the corkboard to edit a folder’s text, thenthe view mode will remain text-only until changed, no matter what type of item youclick on in the binder. A key principle is that view modes are just that. They are alternative ways ofviewing a binder item and thus, like the binder, are methods for organisation. Youcan think of view modes as being like an elaborate extension of the binder, and inthat sense they work closely with it and display information in the same top-downfashion. You can drag items from a corkboard into the binder to move those cards, orvice versa. All file or folder item in the binder can both contain text and children. This is adeparture from how most applications work, where the only way to organise itemsinto other items is to use a folder. Scrivener doesn’t restrict you to that, and indeedeven allows you to convert a text file to a folder and back again. Consequently, eventhough it selects the most appropriate view mode depending upon what you click

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