Online Dating: A New Model for Online Education

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For this presentation, I explored what online dating and online education have in common, and what we as educators can learn from the trends that have made online dating rise in popularity in recent years.

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Online Dating: A New Model for Online Education

  1. 1. WHO SAYS DATING AND EDUCATION HAVENOTHING IN COMMON?Only ten years ago, meeting a partner online was perceived as weird, abnormal, or downright creepy.Today, over 20% of all romantic relationships begin online. (Hughes)Only ten years ago, pursuing a degree online was perceived as a lesser form of education.Today, at least 20% of all degree-seeking students enroll in at least one online class (Van Der Werf, 37).
  2. 2. ONLINE DATING AND ONLINE EDUCATION HAVE MUCH MORE IN COMMON THAN MEETS THE EYE…
  3. 3. “The people who link us up with the world, who bridge Omaha and Sharon, who introduce us to our social circles – these people on whom we rely more heavily than we realize– are Connectors, people with a special gift for bringing the world together.” -Malcolm Gladwell, The Tipping Point (38)
  4. 4. OK CUPID LOCALS MOBILE APPBRINGS ONLINECONNECTIONS HELPS USERS BUILD AOFFLINE NETWORK
  5. 5. (Wesch)
  6. 6. LOWER COSTS OF ONLINE PROGRAMS H O W D O E S I T C O MPA R EPER-PUPIL WITH ONLINEEXPENDITURES E D U C AT I O N ? “…the operating costs of online programs are about the same as the costs of operating brick-and- mortar schools…however, APA did not look at costs related to building facilities or transportation…if they were factored in, the benefit/cost ratio of virtual schools would likely increase and the costs per pupil, as compared to brick-and-mortar schools, would likely be lower…” (Anderson, 13)
  7. 7. 29%
  8. 8. 37%
  9. 9. “The obvious advantage to online dating is that it provides a wider pool of possibility and choice.” -Nick Paumgarten
  10. 10. “The obvious advantage to online dating online education is that it provides a wider pool of possibility and choice.”
  11. 11. REFERENCESAnderson, Amy; Augenblick, John; DeCesare, Dale; Conrad, Jill. 20/20: Costs and Funding of VirtualSchools. BellSouth Foundation, 2 October 2006. Print.Gladwell, Malcolm. The Tipping Point. New York, New York: Back Bay Books: 2000. Print.Hilliard, Rosemary. “Online Dating.” Survey Monkey. Distributed 11 March 2013. Online survey.Hughes, Jeff. Study: The Truth About Online Dating Sites Selling You the Science of Love. Digital Trends, 7 February 2012. Web article.McCarthy, Ellen. Online dating has its pros and cons, meta-analysis says. Washington Post, 5 February 2012. Web article.Online Colleges Blog. Reasons High Schools are Requiring Online Classes. OnlineColleges.org, 27 November 2012. Web article.Paumgarten, Nick. Looking for Someone: Sex, Love, and Loneliness on the Internet. The New Yorker. 4 July, 2011. Web article.Simmons, Kate. Online Vs. Brick-And-Mortar: Which Type of Education is Better For You? Brazen Careerist, 3 December 2012. Web article.StraighterLine. Infographic: History of Distance Education. StraighterLine.com. 23 March 2013.Van Der Werf, Martin; Sabatier, Grant. The College of 2020: Students. Washington, D.C.: Chronicle Research Services, July 2009.Taylor, Paul; Parker, Kim; Lenhart, Amanda; Patten, Eileen. The Digital Revolution and Higher Education. Washington, D.C.: Pew Research Center, 28 August 2011. Print.Wesch, Michael. A Vision of Students Today. Kansas State University, 12 October, 2007. Video.

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