Reflections on Participatory Science for TELSci2.0

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  • The Learner’s Culture and History All of the elements in any Ecology of Resources bring with them a history that defines them and the part they play in the wider cultural and political system. Likewise, the individual at the centre of the Ecology of Resources has their own history of experience that impacts upon their interactions with each of the elements in the Ecology. This wider history and culture is represented in this slide by the shaded areas that surround each of the pairs of elements and the learner at the centre. The existence and the importance of this wider cultural perspective can be addressed through the use of participatory methods to develop effective technologies. It also prompts the need for a detailed discussion, beyond the scope of this talk, of the way in which the Ecology of Resources model can be used as the basis for learning modelling activity. What type of model is the EoR – what is it useful for? Opneing dialogue and sensitising people -
  • - THIS TO BE ACCOMPANIED BY HANDOUT 1 - ASK PAIRS/THREES TO MATCH TECHNOLOGIES TO ACTIVITIES THEY CAN FACILITATE
  • VERY MUCH WEB 2.0 TYPE CHARACTERISTICS
  • Teachers felt this was about using technology more in class, that there were good ideas and that these were potentially useful particularly for new KS3
  • FAILURE TOLERANCE RE. LAST POINT
  • Reflections on Participatory Science for TELSci2.0

    1. 1. Reflections on Participatory Science for TELSci2.0 Joshua Underwood, Rosemary Luckin [email_address] , Hilary Smith, Kevin Walker, Duncan Rowland , Geraldine Fitzpatrick, Judith Good, Steve Benford. LKL, Sussex, Nottingham
    2. 2. The Ecology of Resources Model of Context This underpins our approach to p-science 2.0 participatory design with teachers – it might be useful when thinking about TEL 2.0
    3. 3. A = Zone of Available Assistance learner learner
    4. 4. learner
    5. 5. Key = context category element Tools and People Knowledge and Skills Environment learner
    6. 6. Key = context category element = filter element Tools and People Knowledge and Skills Environment Filter Filter Filter learner
    7. 7. Key = context category element = filter element Tools and People Filter Filter Filter Knowledge and Skills Environment learner
    8. 8. Key = context category element = filter element Tools and People Knowledge filter Tools and People Filter Environment filter Knowledge and Skills Environment learner
    9. 9. The Ecology of Resources model of context <ul><li>The Ecology of Resources model represents the learner holistically with respect to the interactions that make up his or her context </li></ul><ul><li>Modelling context as a set of inter-related resource elements , including people and objects, the interactions between which integrate with their interactions with the learner to provide a particular context. </li></ul>
    10. 10. Participatory science: One example of using the Ecology of Resources to work with teachers
    11. 11. What’s happening in Science? Science 2.0 Open Science mobile-Science People Science openness, collaboration, participation, mobility Related work includes: Participate  ,  RAFT ,  AstroGrid ,  Springwatch ,  Ready to Learn   Teachers TV experiment,  Personal Inquiry Project, Science Apprenticeship Camp (SAC) The ‘new e-science’ e-Science &quot;e-Science is about global collaboration in key areas of science, and the next generation of infrastructure that will enable it.&quot; &quot;e-Science will change the dynamic of the way science is undertaken.&quot; John Taylor, Director General of Research Council
    12. 12. P-science: the need to engage practitioners in the process of design <ul><li>Technology and new approaches bring “hidden work” </li></ul><ul><li>We need to engage teachers in the development of the concept of p-science for learning </li></ul><ul><li>The ipod Challenge : developed through science festivals and with teachers and schools as a way to exemplify p-science characteristics and stimulate debate with teachers at subsequent design workshops. </li></ul>
    13. 14. What characteristics can new technologies facilitate ? Mobile Phones Sensors Instant Messaging Video-Conferencing Digital Video/Audio/Photography Portable Media Players social networking tools Blogs Easy publishing Photo-sharing CONNECTING FORMAL AND EVERYDAY DATA CAPTURE REPORTING SHARING You Tube COLLABORATION ANALYSIS REFLECTION Record and replay tools
    14. 15. Blogger for experiment reports Total of all power contributions and current battery level Plus skype for video with power engineer You Tube for evidence Google Docs for data capture & data sharing flickr for sharing designs
    15. 16. Working with Teachers: Session Design Checklist Tools and People Filter Filter Filter Knowledge and Skills Environment learner
    16. 17. What did teachers do? FORMAL AND INFORMAL DATA CAPTURE SHARING COLLABORATION ANALYSIS Technologies
    17. 18. What did teachers do?
    18. 19. What did teachers think? <ul><li>What was different and new? </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;bringing in experts&quot;, </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;participating with other schools&quot;, </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;publishing pupils work” </li></ul><ul><li>Contact with experts out of school came up most frequently as the aspect of the p-science approach that appeals most </li></ul>
    19. 20. What did teachers think? benefits of the approach? <ul><li>Real data and having to rely on and assess the validity of others' data, and of having more data: &quot;because you are only able to control the experiment in your school; you have to rely on other people. Often our scientists have to rely on other people out there, and get data from different people , and they have to be able to evaluate that and analyse why some of it is better than other.” </li></ul>
    20. 21. What did teachers think? learner Tools and People Filter Filter Filter Knowledge and Skills Environment
    21. 22. What did teachers think? <ul><li>“ We also need training on software because both of us don't know how to use any of the stuff that we're talking about. So we'd need some training.” </li></ul>What challenges/tensions are there for making p-science happen in school? &quot;What I am really worried about this whole thing is I don't know how to use .. I mean I'm not... when it comes to technology but I just haven't used these things before .” &quot;I mean obviously we are going through this quite quickly.. our staff certainly older ones aren't that comfortable with technology and the idea of this will just... well can't you do it the old way?” &quot;it's the older staff that will be the problem not the young learners, I'm sure the kids will err... cotton on to it no problem at all… a lot of the students will already be using this technology for other purposes they….. sure they they feel like they are educating teachers…yeah and I think… it doesn't matter if you give them that illusion ” learner Tools and People Filter Filter Filter Knowledge and Skills Environment
    22. 23. <ul><li>Assessment : &quot;Because the course that this is based on, it's not actually that much harder to do. A lot of it is observation of how well they can do. They've actually got their video of what they've done - that covers a lot of it... Because the group I'm looking at for this is an entry level group, a lot of the written assessment has actually been removed, because they're low ability students , or restricted to what resources they have.” </li></ul>What did teachers think? <ul><li>Institutional rules and regulations : banning of mobile phones and blocking of websites are mentioned </li></ul><ul><li>“ We also need funding - not only for the software but for the actual trip to the zoo. For me, I'm in London so it's free for me. But if you're outside of London it might cost some money.” </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;How much does it cost ? Shozu, is it free?” </li></ul>What challenges/tensions are there for making p-science happen in school? Fit to the curriculum wasn’t really a problem – it was an integral part of discussions. learner Tools and People Filter Filter Filter Knowledge and Skills Environment
    23. 24. P-science – what have we learnt? <ul><li>The Ecology of Resources approach was a useful device for: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Framing the participatory process and developing activity design tools http://e-science.blogspot.com/search/label/tools </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Exploring the data </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Teachers did engage with the development of p-science activities </li></ul><ul><li>But, engaging teachers in the participatory design of the p-science concept was limited – why? </li></ul>
    24. 25. What can the Ecology of Resources approach offer? <ul><li>The Ecology of Resources approach offers a way to: </li></ul><ul><li>Talk about learners holistically – to sensitize us to the range of interactions that constitute their contexts </li></ul><ul><li>Frame the participatory design process </li></ul><ul><li>Explore data to understand more about learners’ contexts </li></ul><ul><li>Identify the assistance that could be available and the way that learners’ interactions with it might be filtered and supported </li></ul><ul><li>Identify situations where scaffolding might be used </li></ul>
    25. 26. Identify Participatory possibilities <ul><li>How might teachers, learners and the general public participate more widely in TEL - setting TEL research agendas, contributing hypotheses and data? </li></ul><ul><li>How might we broaden access to research outcomes and the tools we build - can we design applications to bridge the gaps between TEL research and the communities we aim to serve - DIY TEL research? </li></ul><ul><li>How should we involve citizens and learners in experimentation and at what stages - what should we share in terms of tools, data, methods and findings and with whom? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the technical requirements for TEL components that provide ease of assembly and enable DIY TEL research ? </li></ul><ul><li>How can we change the Ecology of Resources available to all so as to enable broader experimentation with and understanding of technology use to support learning both at an individual and personal level and at the disciplinary level ? </li></ul>
    26. 27. Identify situations where scaffolding might be used <ul><li>How might teachers, learners and the general public participate more widely in TEL - setting TEL research agendas, contributing hypotheses and data? </li></ul><ul><li>How might we broaden access to research outcomes and the tools we build - can we design applications to bridge the gaps between TEL research and the communities we aim to serve - DIY TEL research? </li></ul><ul><li>How should we involve citizens and learners in experimentation and at what stages - what should we share in terms of tools, data, methods and findings and with whom? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the technical requirements for TEL components that provide ease of assembly and enable DIY TEL research? </li></ul><ul><li>How can we change the Ecology of Resources available to all so as to enable broader experimentation with and understanding of technology use to support learning both at an individual and personal level and at the disciplinary level? </li></ul>
    27. 28. Thank you

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