6 S Tools Overview

922 views

Published on

An overview of Six Sigma Methodology Tools that I created in PowerPoint and saved as a PDF.

0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
922
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
45
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

6 S Tools Overview

  1. 1. Six Sigma Tools SIX SIGMA DMAIC Methodology & Tools DESIGNED & CREATED By Rosa Conti OCTOBER 2008
  2. 2. Definition:  DMAICDMAIC = Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve & ControlIt is: A process for continuous improvement Systematic Scientific Fact basedThis closed‐loop process eliminates unproductive steps, often focuses on new measurements and applies technology for improvement.  
  3. 3. Index of  DMAIC ToolsDefine MeasureProject Charter Input, Process & Output IndicatorsSIPOC / Stakeholder Analysis Data Collection Plan As‐Is Process Map Baseline Performance of CCR Control ChartQVA – Qualitative (Value‐Added) Analysis Baseline Sigma CalculationVOC/VOB to CCR Translation Measurement System Analysis: Gage R & R Analyze ImproveProcess Stratification – Using Pareto Analysis Brainstorming TechniquesPotential Root Causes (Fishbone) Solution Selection MatrixSampling of Statistical Tests To‐Be ‘Improved’ Process Map The 5S’s (LEAN DMAIC Tool) FMEA / Risks for Improved Process Activity Schedule Worksheet Drivers & BarriersControlProcess Control SystemBaseline & Improved Performance of CCR (Control Chart) Improved Sigma CalculationFinancial ImpactMulti‐Generation Plan
  4. 4. Back to Index Page TOLLGATE PURPOSE Define Measure Analyze Improve Control• To develop a team charter.• To define the customer(s) and their requirement(s).• To map the business process to be improved.
  5. 5. Back to Index Page Define – Project CharterBusiness Case Opportunity Statement• Why is this project worth doing? • What is the impact “pain” on our customers?• Why is it important to do now? • What is the impact of the problem on our business?• What are the consequences of not doing this project? • What is the impact of the problem on our employees?• What is wrong, not working & not meeting the customer’s needs? • If we fix the “pain,” what do we stand to gain?• How extensive is the problem? • What is the ball park potential value of this project?• What & where do the problems occur?Goal Statement Scope• What is to be accomplished? • What is the process START & END points?• What specific parameters will be measured? • What components of the business are included?• What will be the tangible, “hard” deliverables/results? • What components of the business are not included?• What will be the intangible, “soft” deliverables/results? • What (if any) is outside the project boundaries?• What will be the timeline for delivery of results? • What constraints must the team work under?• What is the operational definition of the output (“Y”) & the defect?Project Plan / Timeline  Team MembersThis area identifies the key milestones (Tollgates) in the project: Assigning responsibilities and roles mitigates the possibility of  misunderstanding or miscommunication.Milestones Planned Dates Actual Dates Define xx‐xx‐xx xx‐xx‐xx Name Role DepartmentMeasure xx‐xx‐xx xx‐xx‐xx GB/BBAnalyze xx‐xx‐xx xx‐xx‐xx Champion/SponsorImprove xx‐xx‐xx xx‐xx‐xx Master Black BeltControl xx‐xx‐xx         xx‐xx‐xx Finance Rep SME
  6. 6. Back to Index Page Define – Project CharterBusiness Case Opportunity Statement• Why is this project worth doing? • What is the impact “pain” on our customers?• Why is it important to do now? The Goal should be SMART: • What is the impact of the problem on our business?• What are the consequences of not doing this project? • What is the impact of the problem on our employees?• What is wrong, not working & not meeting the customer’s needs? Specific • If we fix the “pain,” what do we stand to gain?• How extensive is the problem? Measurable • What is the ball park potential value of this project?• What & where do the problems occur? AttainableGoal Statement Scope Relevant• What is to be accomplished? • What is the process START & END points? Time bound• What specific parameters will be measured? • What components of the business is included?• What will be the tangible, “hard” deliverables/results? • What components of the business is not included?• What will be the intangible, “soft” deliverables/results? • What (if any) is outside the project boundaries?• What will be the timeline for delivery of results? • What constraints must the team work under?• What is the operational definition of the output (“Y”) & the defect?Project Plan / Timeline  Team MembersThis area identifies the key milestones Tollgates in the project: Assigning responsibilities and roles mitigates the possibility of  misunderstanding or miscommunication.Milestones Dates__  Define xx‐xx‐xx Name Role Business RepresentingMeasure xx‐xx‐xx GB/BBAnalyze xx‐xx‐xx ChampionImprove xx‐xx‐xx Black BeltControl xx‐xx‐xx SME SME
  7. 7. Back to Index PageDefine – SIPOC / Stakeholder AnalysisSTART Boundary END BoundaryWhere the process begins (start of Scope) Where the process ends (stop of Scope) Suppliers Inputs Outputs Customers Who supplies the  Raw materials,  Documents,  Who receives these  Inputs? information,  information,  Outputs? specifications,  SOPs, etc. Process parts, phone  calls, products,  Classify as ‘Internal’ completed  or ‘External’ services, etc.  customer Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 High‐Level steps of the process 
  8. 8. Back to Index Page Define – As Is Process Map Also known as a Functional Deployment Map (FDM) High Level  Function 1 Function 2 Function 3 Function 4 Function 5 Process Steps Start Action 1.1 Action 1.2 Step 1 Action 1.5 Action 1.3 No Action 1.4 Y/N Yes Step 2 Action 2.1 Action 2.2 Step 3 END• Displays the steps depicted in a process, in sequential order• Shows where each step is performed• Shows who is involved
  9. 9. Back to Index Page Define – Qualitative Value‐Added Analysis (QVA) Name of Process  Customer  Operational Value‐Added Value‐Added Non‐Value‐Added You want to Maximize/Leverage You want to Minimize You want to Eliminate • Customer recognizes the value • Required to sustain the ability to  • Customer does not recognize the  • Customer will pay for it perform Customer Value‐Added  value • Changes the product or service towards  activities • Customer will not pay for it something the customer expects • Required by contract or other laws &  • Does not change the product/service  • Transforms the product/service closer to  regulations towards something the customer  completion • Required for health, safety,  expects (wait steps,, inspection, moves) • Done right the first time environmental or personnel  • Rework: not doing something right  Activity development reasons the first time Task 1 Task 2 Task 3 Task 4 Task 5• QVA is a tool to analyze the process to identify what is important to the customer• Distinguishes between Customer V‐Adds, Operational V‐Adds & Non Value‐Added Steps• Identifies opportunities to improve the process flow with Quick Wins• Creates a communication vehicle 
  10. 10. Back to Index Page Define – Qualitative Value‐Added Analysis (QVA) Name of Process  Customer  Operational Value‐Added Value‐Added Non‐Value‐Added You want to Maximize/Leverage You want to Minimize You want to Eliminate • Customer recognizes the value • Required to sustain the ability to  • Customer does not recognize the  • Customer will pay for it perform Customer Value‐Added  value • Changes the product or service towards  activities • Customer will not pay for it something the customer expects • Required by contract or other laws &  • Does not change the product/service  QUICK WIN • Transforms the product/service closer to  process changes should be: regulations towards something the customer  completion • Required for health, safety,  expects (wait steps,, inspection, moves) Easy to implement environmental or personnel  • Rework: not doing something right  • Done right the first time Activity Fast to implement development reasons the first time Task 1 Cheap to implement Within your span of control Task 2 Reversible Task 3 Task 4 Task 5• QVA is a tool to analyze the process to identify what is important to the customer• Distinguishes between Customer V‐Adds, Operational V‐Adds & Non Value‐Added Steps• Identifies opportunities to improve the process flow with Quick Wins• Creates a communication vehicle 
  11. 11. Back to Index Page Define – VOC/VOB to CCR Translation This tool translates the SOURCES FOR ACQUIRING VOICE OF THE CUSTOMER/BUSINESS (VOC/VOB) VOC/VOB into specific Internal & External Data Listening Post Research Methods measurable requirements •Existing Company Info • Complaints • Interviews known as • Industry Experts • Customer Service Reps • Focus Groups CCRs (Critical Customer  Requirements)• Secondary Data • Sales Reps • Surveys• Competitors • Internal Departments • Observations HOW TO TRANSLATE VOC/VOB to CCRsVOICE OF THE  Key Customer Issue CCRCUSTOMER/BUSINESSWHAT: Actual customer statements  WHAT: Statement describes the primary  WHAT: The specific, precise and measurable and comments which reflect their  issue a customer may have with the  expectation which a customer has regarding a perception product or service product or serviceHOW: Form a single statement that  HOW: Probe and clarify what the  HOW: Restate the issue or concern in best represents the VOC/VOB customer is really trying to convey measurable terms. This is not a solution but a  measure of what the customer wants“I’m always on hold or end up  Wants to talk to the right person quickly Customer reaches the correct person the first talking to the wrong person.” time within 30 seconds“This software package doesn’t do  The software does what the vendor said it  Every design feature promised is built into the squat.” would do package. The software is fully operational on the  customer’s existing system. The Voice of the Customer/Business  tells us what is important, their needs/wants,  how we are doing against these measures and how/where we can improve
  12. 12. Back to Index Page TOLLGATE PURPOSE Define Measure Analyze Improve Control• To set operational definitions for all data that are collected.• To measure and understand baseline performance of the current process.  
  13. 13. Back to Index Page Measure – Input, Process & Output IndicatorsIllustrates the relationship between the team’s Input & Process Indicators to the Output Indicators. INPUT / PROCESS # of open  # of open  # of forecasted  •# of MRP action  purchase orders production  customer orders  messages (Order,  OUTPUT orders by month Cancel, Expedite,  Defer, etc.) Finished Goods / WIP / Raw  Material On Hand Inventory Finished Goods Production  Schedule Open Customer Orders WIP / Raw Material On Order  Inventory TOTAL SCORE 20 16 30 16 INPUT INDICATORS – Measures that evaluate the degree to which  the inputs to a process (provided by suppliers) are consistent with  what the process needs to efficiently and effectively convert into  Strong Relationship (9) customer‐satisfying outputs. Medium Relationship (3) PROCESS INDICATORS – Measures that evaluate the  effectiveness, efficiency and quality of the transformation  processes – the steps and activities used to convert inputs into  Weak Relationship (1) customer‐satisfying outputs.Blank No Relationship (0)
  14. 14. Back to Index Page Measure – Input, Process & Output IndicatorsIllustrates the relationship between the team’s Input & Process Indicators to the Output Indicators. INPUT / PROCESS # of open  # of open  # of forecasted  •# of MRP action  purchase orders production  customer orders  messages (Order,  OUTPUT orders by month Cancel, Expedite,  Defer, etc.) Finished Goods / WIP / Raw  Material On Hand Inventory Finished Goods Production  Schedule Open Customer Orders WIP / Raw Material On Order  Inventory TOTAL SCORE 20 16 30 16 OUTPUT INDICATORS – Measures that evaluate dimensions  Strong Relationship (9) of the output – may focus on the performance of the business as well  as that associated with the delivery of services and products Medium Relationship (3) to customers. Weak Relationship (1)Blank No Relationship (0)
  15. 15. Back to Index Page Measure – Data Collection PlanSample Data Collection Plan for Loan Application ProcessOutput  Operational  Data Source  Sample  Who Will  When Will  How Will the  Stratification Indicator /  Definition and Location Size Collect the  the Data be  Data be  Factors: Other Data Performance  Data? Collected? Collected? that should be Measure  collectedLoan  START: Loan Rep  289 Team Loan  During the 1st Randomly  • Type of Loanprocessing  Incoming  fax center in  Processing week of the  selected from  • Amount of Loancycle time of  loan  Tampa, FL Clerk(s) next month the prior month • Dealera loan application  • Type of  fax  Application date/time  stamp • Decision Method STOP: Outgoing  decision  letter fax  date/time  Stratification factors stamp can give you clues about causal factors!
  16. 16. Back to Index Page Measure – Baseline Performance of CCR Control Chart Common Cause  is what you are  Special Cause  trying to minimize 20 Variation UCL Upper Control Limit Common CauseOUTPUT INDICATOR VALUES 15 Variation 10 X 5 Mean 0 -5 LCL TIME / SEQUENCE Lower Control LimitCONTROL CHARTS  • Help manage/monitor variation; provide easy‐to‐understand visual indicator of process performance • Requires 3 lines: Solid middle line represents the mean, and the UCL and LCL lines are set at +/‐ 3 standard deviations • The purpose of this chart is to: A. Help understand the type of variation; common cause or special cause? B. Minimize the times you think there is a problem but there is not, as well as the times there IS a problem and you are unaware of it C. Create an analysis and communication vehicle
  17. 17. Back to Index Page Measure – Baseline Performance of CCR Control Chart Common Cause  is what you are  Special Cause  trying to minimize 20 Variation UCL Upper Control Limit Common CauseOUTPUT INDICATOR VALUES 15 Variation 10 X 5 Mean 0 -5 LCL TIME / SEQUENCE Lower Control Limit Just because a process is stable, or in statistical  control, does not mean that its results are  satisfactory.  A process may be very consistent, CONTROL CHARTS  day in and day out but producing items that are  • Help manage/monitor variation; provide easy‐to‐understand visual indicator of process performance nowhere near specification limits. There may  • Requires 3 lines: Solid middle line represents the mean, and the UCL and LCL lines are set at +/‐ 3 standard deviations be opportunity to reduce the MEAN & the  • The purpose of this chart is to: Variation. A. Help understand the type of variation; common cause or special cause? B. Minimize the times you think there is a problem but there is not, as well as the times there IS a problem and you are unaware of it C. Create an analysis and communication vehicle
  18. 18. Back to Index Page Measure – Baseline Performance of CCR Control Chart Common Cause  is what you are  Special Cause  trying to minimize 20 Variation UCL Upper Control Limit Common CauseOUTPUT INDICATOR VALUES 15 Variation 10 X 5 Mean SPECIAL CAUSE variation is not part of  the overall system & is often called an  0 Assignable Cause – which comes from  COMMON CAUSE variation is due to  influences such as a person, machine,  the design of the business process & all  procedure or external event. -5 LCL factors that collectively influence  TIME / SEQUENCE Lower Control Limit the process results or the way the  process is managed.CONTROL CHARTS  • Help manage/monitor variation; provide easy‐to‐understand visual indicator of process performance • Requires 3 lines: Solid middle line represents the mean, and the UCL and LCL lines are set at +/‐ 3 standard deviations • The purpose of this chart is to: A. Help understand the type of variation; common cause or special cause? B. Minimize the times you think there is a problem but there is not, as well as the times there IS a problem and you are unaware of it C. Create an analysis and communication vehicle
  19. 19. Back to Index Page Measure – Baseline Sigma Calculation What is DPMO? Used with DISCRETE Data Z‐Score Used with CONTINUOUS DataDPMO:  Defects Per Million Opportunities Z‐SCORE:  A measure of the distance in standard deviations  of a sample from the mean. It is the average number of defects per unit observed during an average production run … divided by the number of opportunities to make a defect on the product under  Credit Card Application Processing Timestudy during that run … normalized to one million. X CCR Z10 = x—x s The equation is:        D Z10 = 10—6.8 X 1M s =1.2 minutes 1.2 N x O Z10 = 2.67D = total number of defects counted in the  sample; a defect defined as failure to meet a CCR 0 6.8 minutes 10 minutesN = number of units of products or serviceO = number of opportunities per unit of product Cumulative Probability of Yield or service for a customer defect to occurM = million Sigma is the measure of variability. The less variability, the higher the Sigma.
  20. 20. Back to Index Page Measure – Measurement System Analysis: Gage R & RGage R & R is a method to identify the Measurement Error caused by measurement systems. GAGE REPEATABILITY GAGE REPRODUCIBILTY Repeated examination  Repeated examination  by the same individual,  by others,  using the same gage (measurement  using the same gage and same parts, that  system), and same parts. compares results against an expert’s results. Since the part does not change, any  Since the part does not change, any change  change in the measurements must be due  in the measurements must be due to  to changes in the measurement system. changes in the people.• Gage R&Rs can prevent measurement errors prior to conducting process capability study, control chart and product inspection.• Can be used to verify the measurement capability of new measurement tools.• Can be used to compare gage accuracy and measurement capability of different types of measurement tools.• Can be used to verify gage feasibility.• Gives basic information to analyze process capability and to investigate process variation.
  21. 21. Back to Index Page TOLLGATE PURPOSE Define Measure Analyze Improve Control• To analyze the data and the process to determine root causes and   opportunities for improvement.• To finalize all problem statements through root cause validation.
  22. 22. Back to Index Page Analyze – Process Stratification: Using Pareto Analysis Customer Complaints 60.0 Shipping is 85%  100.0% of all Customer Complaints 90.0% 50.0 50.0Number of Complaints 80.0% 70.0% 40.0 Cumulative % 60.0% 30.0 30.0 50.0% 20.0 40.0% 20.0 30.0% 10.0 10.0 20.0% 10.0 Shipping Complaints 10.0% 60 100.0% 0.0 0.0% 90.0% Shipping Installation Delivery Clerical Misc. 50 80.0% Number of Complaints A Pareto  40 70.0% Cumulative % Stratification 60.0% 30 Crushed shipments  50.0% further drills 25 is 45% the reason for  40.0% down to identify  20 Shipping Complaints 30.0% the causes of     10 20.0% SHIPPING complaints 10 5 5 5 10.0% 0 0.0% Crushed Wrong Quantity Moisture Misc.PARETO CHARTS:• 80/20 Rule: Approximately 20% of the causes are producing 80% of the defects• Identifies key problem areas• Validate cause and effect results• Help to determine a Focused Problem Statement  
  23. 23. Back to Index Page Analyze – Process Stratification: Using Pareto Analysis Customer Complaints 60.0 Shipping is 85%  100.0% of all Customer Complaints 90.0% 50.0 50.0Number of Complaints 80.0% 70.0% 40.0 Cumulative % 60.0% 30.0 30.0 50.0% 20.0 40.0% 20.0 30.0% 10.0 10.0 20.0% 10.0 Shipping Complaints 10.0% 60 100.0% 0.0 0.0% 90.0% Shipping Installation Delivery Clerical Misc. 50 80.0% Number of Complaints 70.0% 40 Cumulative % 60.0% 30 Crushed shipments  50.0% 25 is 45% the reason for  40.0% 20 Shipping Complaints Focused Problem Statement can now be: 10 30.0% 20.0% 10 5 5 5 10.0% “Shipping complaints make up 85% of all  0 Crushed Wrong Quantity Moisture Misc. 0.0% customer complaints.  Crushed shipments are approximately 45% of the reason for all Shipping complaints.”
  24. 24. Back to Index Page Analyze – Potential Root Causes (Fishbone) 2 Humidity causes stacked No A/C 1 Identify the Materials / Equipment Environment boxes to fall over Electrical problem Roof was worked on Too hot Focused Problem TEMPERATURE EMPLOYEES DON’T WEAR EQUIPMENT SHUTS DOWN EMPLOYEES DUST SLIPS / FALLS Statement that asks Not sweeping Old Inventory Maintenance X SAFETY GLASSES Uncomfortable Uncomfortable DON’T WEAR SAFETY SHOES enough Sitting around Floors were get to it in time Walkways freeze “Why do we have just swept Improper position use of body EXCESSIVE Dock Metal Plate Freezes = Icy Roof Leaking this problem?” IMPROPER EXTENSION CORDS H20 Cooler Leaking EQUIPMENT & WIRES IN CONFERENCE ROOMS Walkways & Aisles not labeled Budget Limited Lack of Constraints outlets in CRs Wet Surfaces Knowledge Too many Cost to Improve Excess Inventory peripheralsBATTERY / OIL FLUID DISCHARGE FROM FORK TRUCKS POOR LIGHTING Aisles too narrow Consolidation 2 Determine major categories Trucks Battery Chargers In a rush not charged Energy Efficient Lighting Placement – process moved & not under lights anymore Blocked of Facilities Not enough WHS space (causes) of the effect burns Not labeled Aisleways out EMPLOYEES 1 Why are people getting hurt? Generic Categories are: IMPROPER DO NOT FOLLOW LIFTING REP MOVEMENTS • People Product LIFT SAFETY RULES Lack of Training Dimensions TYPE, BEND • Measurements Overpack Bigger Temps design made 3 Knowledge TWIST PULL • Methods Not equipment People are tired paying attention Too large Boxes of Stretch Inefficient Process • Machines or too heavy Breaks Lack of Consolidated Job • Material Reqs Apathy EEs not Knowledge Taking shortcuts Stacking too high • Environment Trained Inventory Ergonomically Stacked Tired / Weights Employees End of Month not listed Reaching not paying Revenue On boxes Product Store for parts attention Activity Vendors FSM (Overtime) to what they’re doing Closer 3 Keep asking WHY to  People Process Maximum use of space identify potential  root causes, at least  FISHBONE DIAGRAM: 3 to 5 times • Is also called an Ishikawa Diagram, and Cause & Effect Diagram • Assists in reaching a common understanding of a problem and its potential root causes/drivers • Links sub‐causes to a single root cause
  25. 25. Back to Index Page Analyze – Sampling of Statistical TestsThe type of data on hand determines which Statistical Tool / Graph should be used. Discrete Continuous t test Discrete Chi‐Square ANOVA DOE Scatter Diagram Logistic Continuous Correlation Regression RegressionREMINDER:DISCRETE: Categories / Buckets – (colors, male/female, defect/no defect, etc.)CONTINUOUS: Numeric Values – (money, time, length, etc.)
  26. 26. Back to Index Page Analyze – The 5S’s5S Category Observations Actions Taken DateSORT / SEPARATE• Get rid of what is not needed• Keep only necessary items at your workplaceSTRAIGHTEN / ORGANIZE• Put the workplace in order• Everything should be easy to find and useSHINE / CLEAN UP• Clean the work area• Eliminate trashSTANDARDIZE / REPEAT• Practice, Practice, PracticeSUSTAIN / MAINTAIN• Create disciplined procedures to create good habitsThe 5S’s is a Lean Process Analysis Tool and can be applied anywhere.
  27. 27. Back to Index Page TOLLGATE PURPOSE Define Measure Analyze Improve Control• To generate, select, design, test and implement improvements.• To document the improved process.
  28. 28. Back to Index Page Improve – Brainstorming TechniquesThe power of Brainstorming is synergy – where the total effect of team efforts is greater than the sum of the individual efforts that each team member could have made on his or her own. • One person comes up with an idea. • The idea triggers a thought in another’s mind and the original idea is then modified. • Another picks up on the trend and builds on the idea even further. • The project ends up with an innovative idea that no one person could have devised alone.  Methods of Brainstorming Brainstorming Steps • Verbal (popcorn method) • Establish Ground Rules • Written (sticky note method) ‐ Capture every idea • Both ‐ Establish a Time Limit ‐ Work through lulls  • Generate • Clarify Brainstorming looks • Organize / Categorize for Quantity, not Quality.
  29. 29. Back to Index Page Improve – Solution Selection Matrix  Cost‐ Sigma Time  Potential Solutions Benefit  Impact Impact TOTAL RANK Impact WEIGHT (1‐5) 2 2 3 Solution A 8 8 10 62 1 Solution B 7 7 10 58 2 Solution C 7 5 10 54 3 Sigma Impact The timing of  Cost was  Step 1  ID Weight for each Criteria was thought to  implementation thought to be     be 2 times as  was thought to  somewhat more  Step 2 List potential solutions important as  be equally  important than  Step 3 Rate importance 1‐10 morale impact. important as the  Sigma & Time. Sigma Impact. Step 4 Tally & RankSOLUTION SELECTION MATRIX:• Overcomes potential solution selection bias by replacing opinions & assumptions with data and facts• Addresses temptation to overlook minor changes in favor of large‐scale changes• Limits outside influences favoring a preconceived solution
  30. 30. Back to Index Page Define – To‐Be ‘Improved’ Process Map Also known as a Functional Deployment Map (FDM) High Level  Function 1 Function 2 Function 3 Function 4 Function 5 Process Steps Start Action 1.1 Action 1.2 Step 1 X Action 1.3 Action 1.5 No Action 1.4 Y/N Yes Step 2 Action 2.1 X Action 2.2 Step 3 END Redraw the Process MapTO BE PROCESS MAP: with the solution & assess • Reflects the solution’s impact and changes to the process the risk with the new steps• Evaluates where non‐value added steps can be reduced or eliminated• Shows where value‐added steps can optimize the operation  
  31. 31. Back to Index Page Improve – FMEA / Risks for Improved Process FMEA: Examines possible product or process  failures & associated risks. Error‐proofs the solution  and/or process.There are 2 Types of FMEA:PRODUCT or SERVICE DESIGN FMEA PROCESS FMEAUncover problems that may result in: Uncover problems that may result in:• Safety hazards • Safety hazards• Malfunctions • Defects in product or service production process• Shortened product life or decreased service satisfaction • Reduced process efficiencyAsk: “How can the product or service fail?” Ask: “How can the product or service fail?”
  32. 32. Back to Index PageImprove – FMEA / Risks for Improved Process RPN: Risk Priority Number Each factor is rated on a 10‐point scale (10 = bad) • SEVERITY – How negative will the impact  of the failure be? • OCCURRENCE – How often is the failure  expected to occur? • DETECTION – How difficult will it be to Completing the FMEA is an 11‐Step process: notice that the failure has occurred? The RPN is the product of 3 Ratings:1.     Review the product, service or process. Severity X Occurrence X Detection2.     Brainstorm and group possible failure modes.3.     List one or more potential effects for each failure mode. Ask: If the failure occurs, what are the consequences?4.     Assign a severity rating for each effect.5.     Assign an occurrence rating for each failure cause.6.     Assign a detection rating for each failure mode.7.     Calculate a risk priority number (RPN) for each effect.8.     Use the RPNs to select high priority failure modes.9.     Plan to reduce or eliminate the risk associated with high priority.10.   Carry out the plans.11.   Re‐compute RPN.
  33. 33. Back to Index Page Improve – Activity Schedule Worksheet Also known as a Project Workplan SAMPLE ACTION PLANPROJECT WORKPLANS:• Coordinates & integrates all efforts across the scope of the project• Identifies a team of individual rather than one “super‐integrator”• Is a detailed implementation work plan that brings together virtually every element of planning into a single document• Describes who does what and when
  34. 34. Back to Index Page Improve – Drivers & Barriers Also known as a Force Field AnalysisSolutions Driving Forces Restraining BarriersPotential Solution 1 • List all the associated driving or “positive” forces • List all the associated restraining or “negative” forcesPotential Solution 2Potential Solution 3DRIVERS & BARRIERS:• Helps to improve an idea and gives it a better chance of acceptance.• Strategize strengths of potential solutions (or minimize their weaknesses) for a more effective implementation• Subjects ideas to hard scrutiny before recommending to management.
  35. 35. Back to Index Page TOLLGATE PURPOSE Define Measure Analyze Improve Control• To institutionalize the improvement and implement ongoing monitoring.• To provide proof of sustained improvement and realized benefit. 
  36. 36. Back to Index Page Control – Process Control & SystemPROCESS CONTROL SYSTEM:• Documents the process• Provides a vehicle for standardization and replication• Communicates process priorities and performance standards• Serves as a vehicle for process reporting and improvement• Ensures financial benefits are realized from Process Improvement
  37. 37. Back to Index Page Control – Baseline & Improved Performance of CCR (Control Chart) By this point, CCR Performance  should be improved & can be  displayed on a revised chart Special Cause  UCL Variation Upper Control Limit OUTPUT INDICATOR VALUES 6 Common Cause Variation X 4 Mean 2 LCL TIME / SEQUENCE Lower Control Limit ORIGINAL BASELINEIMPROVED CONTROL CHARTS It is important to recreate the Control Chart after Improvements have been made, in order to show the decrease in Common Cause Variation (and Special Cause Variation, if applicable).
  38. 38. Back to Index Page Control – Improved Sigma Calculation What is DPMO? Used with DISCREET Data Z‐Score Used with CONTINUOUS DataDPMO:  Defects Per Million Opportunities Z‐SCORE:  A measure of the distance in standard:   deviations of a sample from the mean.It is the average number of defects per unit observed during an average production run … divided by the number  Credit Card Application Processing Timeof opportunities to make a defect on the product under  Xstudy during that run … normalized to one million. CCR Z10 = x—x s Z10 = 10—6.8 The equation is:        D s =1.2 minutes X 1M 1.2 N x O Z10 = 2.67D = total number of defects counted in the  sample; a defect defined as failure to meet a CCRN = number of units of products or service 0 6.8 minutes 10 minutesO = number of opportunities per unit of product or service for a customer defect to occur Cumulative Probability of YieldM = million IMPROVED SIGMA CALCULATION It is important to recalculate the Sigma Calculation after Improvements have been made,  in order to show the decrease in defects (DPMO) and deviations (Z‐Score).
  39. 39. Back to Index PageControl – Financial Impact FINANCIAL SAVINGS CAN BE REALIZED VIA: DIRECT – Measurable impact on financial  statements such as: • Eliminated facilities • Reduced headcount • Recovered revenue • Reduced inventory AVOIDANCE – Impact that cannot be seen in the  financial statements such as: • Part of a facility vacated, but not eliminated • Process improvements that do not result in  headcount reduction • Avoided having to build / purchase additional  equipment
  40. 40. Back to Index Page Control – Multi‐Generation Plan PHASE 1 PHASE II PHASE III Currently Underway 6‐12 Months 12+ Months Name of Project /  Reduce Inventory for  Reduce Inventory for  Reduce Inventory for  Description Business Unit # 1 Business Unit # 2 Business Unit # 3 Goal Statement  Reduce Inventory for  Reduce Inventory for  Reduce Inventory for  Business # 1 by $X,  Business # 2 by $X,  Business # 3 by $X,  January 2009. March 2009. May 2009. Opportunity  The opportunity  The opportunity  The opportunity  Statement exists to reduce  exists to reduce  exists to reduce  inventory to $X. inventory to $X. inventory to $X. Scope Start: Department A Start.: Department C Start: Department E (Start and End) End: Department B End: Department D Start: Department F Potential Project  Sally  Sam James Manager Potential Champion Michael Richard Margaret Six Sigma  DMAIC DMAIC DMAIC MethodologyThe purpose of a Multi‐Generation Plan is to develop an understanding of the capabilities or technologies that are required to accomplish the longer‐term goal. 

×