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The societal impact of artificial intelligence: What artificial intelligence can do in the legal system and how

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Presented at the AIHelsinki kickoff 2015-12-16

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The societal impact of artificial intelligence: What artificial intelligence can do in the legal system and how

  1. 1. The societal impact of artificial intelligence – What artificial intelligence can do in the legal system and how Anna Ronkainen Chief Scientist, TrademarkNow @ronkaine AIHelsinki kickoff 2015-12-16
  2. 2. $200–300B USD/year!
  3. 3. A lot of difficult conversations to be had about AI and society -  will full employment be just a pipe dream – and is it even desirable anymore -  will income equality increase even more if people are divided into those who tell computers what to do and those who do what computers tell them to do -  will we still allow people to drive cars -  will big data and omnipresent data gathering make privacy a thing of the past -  ...oh, and about those autonomous weapons...
  4. 4. Presuming we’re a more solution- oriented bunch in this room... -  commercially AI is now where mobile was in the ~1980s: the only way is up -  probably no new N-word in sight, instead many smaller Finnish companies doing quite well (look around you) -  AI potentially affecting 100–200k jobs in Finland alone by 2025, and that tech has to come from somewhere
  5. 5. What’s law got to do with it? -  one of the very first application domains for AI (1950s) -  back in the day, law was at the forefront of the automatic data processing revolution in general (e.g. the great Pennsylvania Health Code search-and-replace) -  kind of a structural isomorphism between law (as commands from the legislator to be carried out by a judge or a citizen) and software (commands from the programmer to be carried out by the CPU), superficially correct but misleading
  6. 6. In ye olden days (and still in Finland) there were legal informatics -  everything having to do with computers and the law lumped into one discipline -  software copyright, patents, privacy... -  computational legal theory -  theory of legal information -  originally a 50/50 mix of people with a (often practical) legal background and a CS background, until the 1990s
  7. 7. More and less recent trends in AI & law -  1980s: expert systems (and logics) -  1990s: ontologies (and logics) -  2000s: argumentation (and logics) -  2010s: outside interest/wake-up call from e- discovery (and logics) -  a research community of ~500 people -  main confs ICAIL and JURIX; AI&law journal published by $pringer
  8. 8. A couple of real-life examples
  9. 9. (Ronkainen (2010): Mosong, a Fuzzy Logic Model of Trade Mark Similarity)
  10. 10. What we do at TrademarkNow -  trademark search: making sure your new brand isn’t too close to earlier trademarks to give your problems -  trademark watch: alerting you about new filings too close to your own marks to help you take the necessary steps to protect them (by filing an opposition against the new mark) -  globally, now >60 jurisdictions fully covered
  11. 11. How we do it -  data acquisition, import -  inbound processing of individual marks, storage -  search and watch UIs -  likelihood of confusion algorithm -  similarity of trademarks -  phonetical, graphical, semantic, animal, mineral -  similarity of goods and services -  registrability (absolute grounds) analysis and other useful information (e.g. dictionary results) -  reporting -  ...all using all kinds of AI techniques from GOFAI to deep learning as appropriate
  12. 12. Why Finland needs more AI & law -  fewest lawyers per capita in the OECD -  court system struggles esp. with processing times (many, many ECHR judgements) -  most solutions have to be jurisdiction- specific (because the law is so different) -  small country = small market, not all that interesting for outsiders
  13. 13. Why AI & law needs Finland -  the AI & law research community has been rather insular (focus on just a couple of special topics at a time, no new ideas coming from the outside) -  little focus on building systems with a practical impact (or even validation, or even doing work that can be validated) -  ...and (of course) lots of amazeballs AI people with mad skillz in Finland
  14. 14. Thank you!

Presented at the AIHelsinki kickoff 2015-12-16

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