Positioning presentation - April Business Consulting

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Positioning presentation - April Business Consulting

  1. 1. Positioning<br />And the Marketing Strategy<br />Sharon Hess<br />sharon@aprilbc.com www.aprilbc.com<br />
  2. 2. Agenda<br />Agenda<br /><ul><li>The Marketing Strategy
  3. 3. What is positioning
  4. 4. Segmentation
  5. 5. Customers
  6. 6. How to find your position in 8 steps
  7. 7. What to do next</li></li></ul><li>What is a Marketing Strategy<br />What is a Marketing Strategy?<br /><ul><li>The process that moves an organization to concentrate its limited resources on the greatest opportunities to increase sales and achieve a sustainable competitive advantage. </li></ul>How do we create a Marketing Strategy?<br /><ul><li>Define the market segment we are addressing
  8. 8. Understand the customer needs
  9. 9. Develop the positioning
  10. 10. Create a positioning statement
  11. 11. Use the positioning as the guideline to complete the marketing strategy</li></li></ul><li>What is Positioning?<br /><ul><li>Positioning is a perceptual location. It's where your product or service fits into the marketplace. Effective positioning puts you first in line in the minds of potential customers.
  12. 12. To achieve effective Positioning, you need to first define the different Segments and then Target the ones that are most attractive.
  13. 13. Within the targeted segment, you must know as much as you can about the market, the customer, and the competition.
  14. 14. Positioning = Market Segmentation + Competitive Differentiation </li></li></ul><li>What is Positioning?<br /><ul><li>In marketing, positioning has come to mean the process by which marketers try to create an image or identity in the minds of their target market for its product, brand, or organization.</li></li></ul><li>The Best Positioning, Ever<br />The Avis Story<br />
  15. 15. What will Positioning Create?<br /><ul><li>The UVP - Unique Value Proposition
  16. 16. The USP - Unique Selling Proposition
  17. 17. The Differentiator
  18. 18. And we will be able to stand out from the competition</li></li></ul><li>What is a Market Segment?<br />A group of customers sharing common desires, needs, and buying patterns.<br /> William Davidow, Marketing HighTechnology<br />
  19. 19. Criteria for Segmentation<br /><ul><li>Psychographic homogeneity
  20. 20. Identity
  21. 21. Accessibility
  22. 22. Significant potential</li></li></ul><li>Why Segment?<br /><ul><li>Identify manageable group(s) of target customers
  23. 23. Determine attractive entry point into industry
  24. 24. Focus market strategy
  25. 25. Define appropriate channel, sales tactics and promotion
  26. 26. Match/drive product development efforts</li></li></ul><li>Who is the Customers?<br /><ul><li>End user
  27. 27. Sales channels
  28. 28. Direct (sales force)
  29. 29. Distributors
  30. 30. Agents
  31. 31. Reps
  32. 32. Retail outlets
  33. 33. OEMs
  34. 34. Internal organization – TI
  35. 35. Etc.
  36. 36. Each group will need different/unique positioning</li></li></ul><li>Positioning Among Ourselves<br /><ul><li>As individuals, we continually position ourselves
  37. 37. The responsible older sibling
  38. 38. The class clown
  39. 39. The math wizard
  40. 40. A bean counter
  41. 41. A computer nerd
  42. 42. The group leader
  43. 43. These identifiers help us define ourselves and distinguish our abilities as unique and different from other people</li></li></ul><li>Positioning Examples<br /><ul><li>Variety
  44. 44. Social responsibility
  45. 45. Flexibility
  46. 46. Safety
  47. 47. Prestige
  48. 48. Cool bargain provider
  49. 49. Make people happy
  50. 50. Be active, energized, a winner
  51. 51. A computer on every desktop
  52. 52. Looking good (not fashionable)
  53. 53. Connecting people
  54. 54. The experience
  55. 55. Convenience
  56. 56. Baskin-Robbins
  57. 57. Ben & Jerry’s
  58. 58. Burger King
  59. 59. Volvo
  60. 60. Mont Blanc
  61. 61. Southwest Airlines
  62. 62. Disney
  63. 63. Nike
  64. 64. Microsoft
  65. 65. Ralph Lauren
  66. 66. Nokia
  67. 67. Apple
  68. 68. AM:PM</li></li></ul><li>The Positioning Statement<br /><ul><li>A formal statement depicting how you want your target segment to perceive you. In essence, it is a promise to the target segment that you will provide them with the benefits they care about the most.
  69. 69. The positioning statement is less an external marketing tactic and more an internal document that helps the firm direct its marketing efforts.</li></li></ul><li>Positioning Statement: Example<br /><ul><li>The way people really think about the AM:PM on the corner is "Convenient, but more expensive.“
  70. 70. So you might position them with a slogan that says, "Worth the convenience." You could even build a campaign around that idea, "Worth the convenience.”</li></li></ul><li>
  71. 71. Simple Positioning Statement<br /><ul><li>Use your customers' most desired benefits as the basis of the</li></ul> positioning statement <br /><ul><li>One way is to write this four part sentence:
  72. 72. FOR - the name/definition of the segment
  73. 73. WHO – need the most important customer benefits to that segment
  74. 74. THE – the offering
  75. 75. UNLIKE - the key reason why you can provide the customer benefits better than the competition</li></li></ul><li>Positioning is in Your Mind<br /><ul><li>Positioning is not what you do to a product
  76. 76. It is what you do to the mind of the prospect
  77. 77. That is, you position the product in the mind of the prospect </li></li></ul><li>Positioning Statement<br /><ul><li>Describes real benefits that exist
  78. 78. Indicates preference for brand
  79. 79. Part of marketing strategy
  80. 80. Executed through marketing roadmap
  81. 81. = Creates bible for marketing communications efforts</li></li></ul><li>Positioning Exercise<br />
  82. 82. How Do You Find Your Position?<br />Step 1<br />What are you positioning?<br />Step 1<br />What are you positioning?<br />Step 2 & 3<br />Who are your customers?<br />Step 4<br />What are their requirements?<br />Step 5<br />How do you measure up?<br />Step 6<br />State your position<br />Step 7<br />Test your position<br />Step 7a<br />Explore the less obvious<br />Step 8 <br />Finalize your positioning statement<br />
  83. 83. Step 1 - What are we Positioning?<br /><ul><li>We can position anything
  84. 84. A company
  85. 85. A visionary
  86. 86. A product
  87. 87. Positioning is based on context, so when you state what you are</li></ul> positioning, also state what you are positioning it against <br /><ul><li>What are we positioning it against/visa vie
  88. 88. Café Hillel vs. other coffee shops
  89. 89. Lady Gaga vs. other music industry divas
  90. 90. iPod vs. other MP3 players
  91. 91. Wharton MBA vs. other MBA programs
  92. 92. Multimedia messaging (MMS) vs. other types of messaging
  93. 93. A product line
  94. 94. A concept</li></li></ul><li>Step 2 – Who is the Target Customer?<br /><ul><li>Pick the target customer (from the most attractive segments)
  95. 95. There is a big difference between end user, channel, internal, etc. customers
  96. 96. Choose the ONE most important target customer!
  97. 97. Each target customer segment will need its own positioning</li></li></ul><li>Step 3 - Who is the Customer?<br /><ul><li>By geography – where
  98. 98. By psycho-graphics – lifestyles, beliefs
  99. 99. By social-cultural factors – class, education,
  100. 100. By demographics – age, sex,
  101. 101. By profession
  102. 102. By purchasing behavior</li></ul>Examples: <br /><ul><li>Mid-west, church goer, engineering background, technically sophisticated, <$150K income, golf enthusiast, married with children, decision maker, early adopter, frequent switching behavior
  103. 103. My customers are MIS directors at Fortune 100 companies
  104. 104. My customers are young doctors at major urban hospitals
  105. 105. My customers are unmarried men with college degrees who purchase two large pizzas a week</li></li></ul><li>Step 4 - What are the Customers Requirements?<br /><ul><li>List at least 10 from the product and from the company</li></ul>Product<br /><ul><li>Price
  106. 106. Ease of use
  107. 107. Compatible
  108. 108. Easy installation
  109. 109. Speed
  110. 110. Rack by importance
  111. 111. Rack by importance in 2-3 or 3-5 years (vision) – what has changed? (Positioning needs a long term view)</li></ul>Company<br /><ul><li>Local representation
  112. 112. Know brand
  113. 113. Case studies
  114. 114. Customer support
  115. 115. Warranty</li></li></ul><li>Step 5 - How Do You Measure to the Competition?<br /><ul><li>Create a grid listing customer requirements in order of importance
  116. 116. Rack by who fulfills the need best
  117. 117. Create leaders and contenders
  118. 118. Where do you fit in and rank?</li></li></ul><li> <br />Customer Requirement<br />Mazda 6<br />Toyota Camry<br />Ford Mondeo<br />Honda Accord<br />Quality<br /> <br />Ethical company<br /> <br />Global reach<br /> <br />High resale value<br /> <br />Price<br />L<br /> <br />C<br /> <br />C<br /> <br />L<br />C<br /> <br />L<br /> <br /> <br /> <br />C<br /> <br />C<br />C<br /> <br />C<br /> <br />C<br /> <br />C<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />C<br /> <br /> <br /> <br />L<br />Step 5 - Competitive Grid<br />Summary: Hondas have the highest quality and resale value <br />among mid-priced cars. <br />
  119. 119. Digital Camera<br />
  120. 120. Step 6 - State Your Position<br /><ul><li>Define the customer
  121. 121. Define the technology and product category
  122. 122. Compelling claim to leadership position
  123. 123. Attributes of product leadership</li></li></ul><li>Step 6 - Example<br />
  124. 124. Step 7 – Test Your Position<br /><ul><li>Is it compelling?
  125. 125. Is it sustainable?
  126. 126. My company’s position is compelling to customers
  127. 127. My company’s position is sustainable
  128. 128. There are no changes on the horizon that will make my company’s position irrelevant or undesirable to customers
  129. 129. Competitors are not well prepared to challenge my company’s position</li></li></ul><li> <br />Alternative Approach<br /> <br />Example<br /> <br />Create a new requirement for the product category<br /> <br /> <br />Blackberry: PDA with anywhere email<br /> <br />Target a new segment<br /> <br />The Osbornes: Reality TV<br /> <br />Explain the benefits offered by a non-leader<br /> <br /> <br />7Up: the Un-Cola<br />Explain that while you may not be the leader on any one requirement, you are the best at meeting multiple requirements.<br /> <br /> <br />Samsung: feature rich phones<br /> <br />Position yourself as a future leader.<br /> <br />HP: future market share leader<br /> <br />Step 7a – Explore the Less Obvious<br />
  130. 130. Step 8 - Finalize Positioning Statement<br /><ul><li>Draft your statement. Revise and polish it</li></li></ul><li>Go to Market Plan<br /><ul><li>As soon as you know your target customers and what is the UVP to sell to them, you are ready to start to build your ‘go to market’ or implementation plan
  131. 131. Selling Volvos in Golfer magazine
  132. 132. Targeting Playstation Portable to 18-35 year olds at CES tradeshow
  133. 133. User meeting to introduce new product to customer base
  134. 134. Training sales agents to highlight specific benefits
  135. 135. Rally company around the position statement
  136. 136. Live up to the statement in every way</li></li></ul><li>Buzz Words or Not<br />
  137. 137. The Marketing Strategy<br /><ul><li>Defines most attractive markets and the firm’s positioning in them
  138. 138. Defines the market segment being addressing
  139. 139. Builds itself around the customer needs
  140. 140. Has a positioning statement or UVP/USP
  141. 141. Uses the positioning statement to build the strategy correctly</li></li></ul><li>thank you<br />Sharon Hess sharon@aprilbc.com<br />054-4848828<br />

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