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An Introduction toAnimal EducationOutreach.An Information Pack in Power Point Format.www.animaleducationoutreach.weebly.com/
Animal Education OutreachAbout.Animal Education Outreach (AEO) was formed in2011.Purpose: to develop and distribute educ...
Animal Education Outreach producesmaterials for all levels of the Irishschool curriculum.PRE-SCHOOLPRIMARYJUNIORSENIOR
“Pre-school” (ages 4-5-6).Even at this early level, children are expected to begin to gentlyengage with learning that is ...
The “Categories or Group Game” andColour me in!
The “Categories or Group Game.” Pre-school children learn through playand exploration. Our “Categories orGroup Game” star...
“Being fair.”Young children often develop their moral ideas about what isright and what is wrong by thinking about fair t...
Primary (ages 6-12)Again with a sensitivity to the needs and moral and socialdevelopment of this age group, Animal Educati...
Categories (plus) We also feature the CategoriesGame in the early years of primarylevel. However, the ethicalquestions ar...
10Animals used for meat…
Share the WorldFor older children atprimary level, we havea 25-minute DVD,Share the World,introduced by Babestar James Cro...
Worksheets on various subjectsare also available for all years ofthe primary stage. From gettingchildren to begin their o...
Some points to help you write these essays.Animal Education Outreach.Choose an Essay Title.1.Would it be wrong to eat whal...
Junior (ages 12-15). For the junior levels, when a fuller examination of contemporary social and moral issues is expected...
Junior.
Junior level.The level of ethicalassessment reflected inthe curriculum allowsus to introduce morechallenging materialsfor ...
Junior level.Animal EducationOutreach is busyproducing our own uniqueDVDs which show Irishfootage of relevant issues.These...
Senior (age 15-18). Our senior materials are mostobviously relevant to the LeavingCertificate (Applied) programmebut we a...
Senior.The LC (Established)programme in HomeEconomics also looks atthe issue of diet and foodrequirements. This looksat a ...
Senior Student Tasks (STs) are used as a means of integrating courses, and schools supportprovide a Programme Co-ordinato...
Senior There is no doubt that human-nonhuman relationspose a number of contemporary issues and theseare played out at all...
SeniorThe Practical Achievement Task. The Practical Achievement Task is undertaken over a three-month period. This ST isg...
Animal EducationOutreach has a numberof filmed debates anddocumentaries which wecan make available tosenior classes.
Senior level.Text Resources.Animal EducationOutreach has access toextensive text resourceswhich we can makeavailable inpho...
Text Resources.Our text resourcescover a wide rangeof relevantsubjects.
Text resources.Especially in thefields of animalrights, animalwelfare and socialmovement theory.
Animal EducationTrust.http://animaleducationoutreach.weebly.com/animaleducationoutreach@topmail.iehttps://www.facebook....
An introduction to Animal Education Outreach (Ireland)
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An introduction to Animal Education Outreach (Ireland)

An introduction to the work of Dublin-based Animal Education Outreach in power point format.

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An introduction to Animal Education Outreach (Ireland)

  1. 1. An Introduction toAnimal EducationOutreach.An Information Pack in Power Point Format.www.animaleducationoutreach.weebly.com/
  2. 2. Animal Education OutreachAbout.Animal Education Outreach (AEO) was formed in2011.Purpose: to develop and distribute educational materials that addressanimal use and treatment.AEO officers are experienced in presenting school talks , employing all themodern educational aids such as DVDs, Power Point slide shows andsupporting literature, in order to explore the range of views about humanrelations with other animals.
  3. 3. Animal Education Outreach producesmaterials for all levels of the Irishschool curriculum.PRE-SCHOOLPRIMARYJUNIORSENIOR
  4. 4. “Pre-school” (ages 4-5-6).Even at this early level, children are expected to begin to gentlyengage with learning that is focused on citizenship issues suchas "attitudes and values" and "relationships with others."Children often have strong relations with animals such as petsand those they meet in storybooks and films - at this age,nonhuman animals are friends, companions and even mentors.Animal Education Outreachs materials for this level cater for thesensitivities of children at this age. We focus, for example, on issues offairness in our relations with others and ask the question, what doesthat mean with respect to our interactions with animals.examples….
  5. 5. The “Categories or Group Game” andColour me in!
  6. 6. The “Categories or Group Game.” Pre-school children learn through playand exploration. Our “Categories orGroup Game” starts with the childrenidentifying animals whose names beginwith a certain letter and the childrenwho guess correctly are invited to standat the front of the class with their“animal cards.” The rest of the classthen place the representative childreninto different categories such as “pets,”“animals we see in circuses and zoos,”“animals we eat,” and “animals wewear.” We gently explore the notion that thesecategories are cultural and see howpeople in different places and times usedifferent types of animals.
  7. 7. “Being fair.”Young children often develop their moral ideas about what isright and what is wrong by thinking about fair treatment.Notions of “being fair” are central to teaching ethical ideas atthis early stage.Our presentations encourage children to think what “being fair”means in our relations with each other and nonhuman animals.
  8. 8. Primary (ages 6-12)Again with a sensitivity to the needs and moral and socialdevelopment of this age group, Animal Education Outreachhas created a range of age-appropriate educational materials.Within educational units in strands entitled, "Myself," "Myself and Others,"and "Myself and the Wider World," the broad objectives of the SPHE curriculumincludes enabling children to "make decisions, solve problems and takeappropriate actions in various personal, social and health contexts," to begin anawareness of the "various influences on choices and decisions" (such as socialmovements, businesses and advertising), to "begin to identify, review andevaluate the values and attitudes that are held by individuals and society," to"recognise that these affect thoughts and actions," and to "promote the values ofa just and caring society."examples…
  9. 9. Categories (plus) We also feature the CategoriesGame in the early years of primarylevel. However, the ethicalquestions are a little moredeveloped – for example, we mayexplore whether animals are“happy” in zoos and circuses; if thechildren have thought about how“circus animals” are trained; what’sthe difference between “pet”animals and “food” animals, etc. Dependent on age, we may askwhat’s strange or “wrong” aboutthe following picture…
  10. 10. 10Animals used for meat…
  11. 11. Share the WorldFor older children atprimary level, we havea 25-minute DVD,Share the World,introduced by Babestar James Cromwelland exploring themessuch as “animals andtheir feelings,” and“the amazing world ofanimals.”[individual sections of theDVD pose questions for thechildren to answer in“discussion times.”]
  12. 12. Worksheets on various subjectsare also available for all years ofthe primary stage. From gettingchildren to begin their own“animal fact file” to stories abouta pig who rescued a boy and afamily who rescued a crow toyes-no questionnaires about zoos.Some worksheets suggest essayquestions for the older childrenat primary level.examples….
  13. 13. Some points to help you write these essays.Animal Education Outreach.Choose an Essay Title.1.Would it be wrong to eat whale meat or dog meat?2.Where should we draw the line about what we eat?3.Why do we pet some animals and eat others?In Korea and other countries, dogs are bred to be killed and eaten. In China, it isquite possible to have flesh from monkeys in a meal. In Japan, whale meat iseaten, while in France and other European countries, horse flesh is consumed.How do you feel about this?Is it right?Should it be allowed?Would you eat the flesh of these animals? Why – or why not?In Ireland, we eat the parts of chickens, pigs, cows,and sheep. These animals have a lot in commonwith whales, monkeys, dogs, and horses.All these nonhuman animals can feel pain, and theyare individuals who can suffer and who havepreferences. Pigs are regarded as more intelligentthan dogs, while cows are gently giants.If people feel it is wrong to eat whales, dogs,monkeys and horses, should they think more aboutthe nonhuman animals they do eat?WHAT’STHEDIFFERENCE?
  14. 14. Junior (ages 12-15). For the junior levels, when a fuller examination of contemporary social and moral issues is expectedwithin the curriculum, we present a range of views relating to human-nonhuman relations thatinclude versions of animal welfare and animal rights. There are different views on these subjects. For example, proponents of animal welfare emphasisethe welfare advantages of “free-range beef” over “factory farmed beef” production, while animalrightists would criticise all animal use. All of these points impact not only on the health and dietchoices of children but also on their ethical choices as well. Animal Education Outreach offers the opportunity to promote the active learning which is essentialto the curriculum by facilitating the exploration of issues, the acquisition of knowledge and thedevelopment of skills appropriate to this age group that are relevant to the social, personal andhealth dimensions of their lives. AEO presenters encourage students to recognise values anddevelop positive attitudes in relation to themselves, other people and the wider world. Animal Education Outreach aims to help pupils to explore, analyse and evaluate human-nonhumanissues and consequently to help them acquire the skills of moral and critical appraisal integral tocompletion of the Junior Certificate.
  15. 15. Junior.
  16. 16. Junior level.The level of ethicalassessment reflected inthe curriculum allowsus to introduce morechallenging materialsfor the juniors.
  17. 17. Junior level.Animal EducationOutreach is busyproducing our own uniqueDVDs which show Irishfootage of relevant issues.These are mini-films tofacilitate their use in class.There are also a variety ofcommercial DVDs and CD-ROMs available to schoolsfor projects.
  18. 18. Senior (age 15-18). Our senior materials are mostobviously relevant to the LeavingCertificate (Applied) programmebut we also cater for the LeavingCertificate (Established), theTransition Year and the Vocationalprogramme. Teaching criteria within the LC(Established) programme includesHome Economics and issues suchas, factors affecting food choices,current food habits and trends,maintaining a healthy body weight,and the Irish food industry.
  19. 19. Senior.The LC (Established)programme in HomeEconomics also looks atthe issue of diet and foodrequirements. This looksat a range of humandiseases, includingosteoporosis, which areassociated with theconsumption of animalproducts.The module also looks atvarious food regimes suchas lacto-vegetarian, andvegan.
  20. 20. Senior Student Tasks (STs) are used as a means of integrating courses, and schools supportprovide a Programme Co-ordinator who oversees the management and planning of STs.The STs that are most relevant in terms of the expertise of the Animal EducationOutreach presenters are the Contemporary Issue Task, the Practical Achievement Taskand the Personal Reflection Task. The Contemporary Issue Task requires the student to conduct and complete aninvestigation into, and to take action in relation to, a contemporary issue of socialsignificance in the local, national and/or global community… The investigation should help the student to develop her/his awareness andunderstanding of the different dimensions of the particular issue chosen e.g. social,political, civic, economic and cultural dimensions. Students can choose topics that are ofinterest to them and should, conduct an investigation, develop skills of planning andrecording, understanding an issue in greater depth, understand an issue in a broadercontext, undertake an action and develop skills of reflection and evaluation.
  21. 21. Senior There is no doubt that human-nonhuman relationspose a number of contemporary issues and theseare played out at all levels, local, national andglobal.  Whether students are interested in animal rights,animal welfare, the environmental impact ofagriculture, or health issues, Animal EducationOutreach has relevant materials and speakers. We are able to assist students meet requiredcriteria at senior level, such as: The issue selected must be a contemporary issueof social significance. The issue may be local, national or global in scope. The issue must be linked to one or more of the keyconcepts and/or themes of the Social Educationcourse e.g. equality, gender, health, relationships,conflict, law, community, democracy, development,social justice, human rights and responsibilities,active citizenship, forces/interests (media, pressuregroups, lobbying). The student is expected to be able to makeconnections between the issue they areinvestigating and other related issues and contexts.
  22. 22. SeniorThe Practical Achievement Task. The Practical Achievement Task is undertaken over a three-month period. This ST isgeared towards students gaining a strong sense of achievement and can include"undertaking an initiative." This initiative could, for example, involve being vegan for a month, and/or organising avegan fair or event, such as organising a film night or debate.The Personal Reflection Task. The Personal Reflection Task, as the name suggests, is a reflexive exercise the studentsengage in. They should ask themselves, what was I like before this experience?, whatdid I expect of this experience?, what was the experience actually like?, what have Ilearned about myself from this experience? and, how has this affected my outlook andplans for the future?
  23. 23. Animal EducationOutreach has a numberof filmed debates anddocumentaries which wecan make available tosenior classes.
  24. 24. Senior level.Text Resources.Animal EducationOutreach has access toextensive text resourceswhich we can makeavailable inphotocopied form tosenior studentsengaged in studyrelevant to human-nonhuman relations.
  25. 25. Text Resources.Our text resourcescover a wide rangeof relevantsubjects.
  26. 26. Text resources.Especially in thefields of animalrights, animalwelfare and socialmovement theory.
  27. 27. Animal EducationTrust.http://animaleducationoutreach.weebly.com/animaleducationoutreach@topmail.iehttps://www.facebook.com/AnimalEducationOutreach

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