How to increase the odds of getting  your paper published   Bill Roesler, Department of Biochemistry Editorial board membe...
General Comments <ul><li>Be sure that you are choosing an appropriate journal </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Distributions of co-...
General Comments <ul><li>Don’t assume that the reviewers will be experts on the  specific  area covered by your manuscript...
Comments on Specific Sections of a Manuscript <ul><li>Title </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Don’t try to make it all inclusive, too ...
Comments on Specific Sections of a Manuscript <ul><li>Abstract </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Briefly outline the issue, question b...
Comments on Specific Sections of a Manuscript <ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Should be focussed and succinct, ...
Comments on Specific Sections of a Manuscript <ul><li>Methods and Materials </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Need to provide sufficie...
Comments on Specific Sections of a Manuscript <ul><li>Results </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This is the most important section, th...
Comments on Specific Sections of a Manuscript
•  Make sure that the interpretation of the data is consistent with the data shown!
Comments on Specific Sections of a Manuscript <ul><li>Results </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Figure legends should contain sufficie...
Comments on Specific Sections of a Manuscript <ul><li>Discussion </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This should not be a rehash of the ...
Comments on Specific Sections of a Manuscript <ul><li>References </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Even if you use a reference manager...
Submitting a Revised Manuscript <ul><li>Don’t always take a rejection as a rejection; read the letter from the editor care...
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How to increase the odds of getting

  1. 1. How to increase the odds of getting your paper published Bill Roesler, Department of Biochemistry Editorial board member for “ The Journal of Biological Chemistry ” and “ Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology ”
  2. 2. General Comments <ul><li>Be sure that you are choosing an appropriate journal </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Distributions of co-activators CBP and p300 during mouse oocyte and embryo development” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Comply with the journal guidelines for style of manuscript; manuscripts can be rejected for deficiencies in style even though the science is good </li></ul><ul><li>If English is not your first language, seek help for grammar, spelling, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Be consistent in terminology, abbreviations, figure presentation, etc. For example, use the same terms and abbreviations in the text and in the figures. </li></ul>
  3. 3. General Comments <ul><li>Don’t assume that the reviewers will be experts on the specific area covered by your manuscript; this impacts on how you write your manuscript </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Always get someone unfamiliar with your work to read it </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Emphasize why the work is important, why it represents a significance advance in understanding of that particular research area </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t be afraid to suggest appropriate reviewers or indicate those who you would rather not review your manuscript </li></ul>
  4. 4. Comments on Specific Sections of a Manuscript <ul><li>Title </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Don’t try to make it all inclusive, too complicated, or too long! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Regulation of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V activity. Kinetic comparisons of parental, Rous sarcoma virus-transformed BHK, and L- phytohemagglutinin-resistant BHK cells using synthetic substrates and an inhibitory substrate analog” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The title should be consistent with the major conclusions of the paper </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Comments on Specific Sections of a Manuscript <ul><li>Abstract </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Briefly outline the issue, question being addressed </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Summarize the findings; this doesn’t mean you have to comment on every single experiment performed </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Conclude with a statement of overall findings and significance </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Comments on Specific Sections of a Manuscript <ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Should be focussed and succinct, providing just enough information so the reader understands the issue being addressed and its significance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Do not make it a literature review! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Do not end off with a summary of the findings! There is an abstract for that purpose. </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Comments on Specific Sections of a Manuscript <ul><li>Methods and Materials </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Need to provide sufficient information to allow someone to repeat your experiments </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>For common techniques, a reference is often sufficient; for unusual or uncommon techniques, even if a reference is available, a brief summary is required </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Comments on Specific Sections of a Manuscript <ul><li>Results </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This is the most important section, the one reviewers spend most of their time on </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Discuss figures and panels in the order that they appear </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Explain each experiment carefully - the rationale, what type of experiment, the data obtained, and a brief comment on what can be concluded </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Comment on all of the data that is in the figure, including the results from control experiments </li></ul></ul>
  9. 9. Comments on Specific Sections of a Manuscript
  10. 10. • Make sure that the interpretation of the data is consistent with the data shown!
  11. 11. Comments on Specific Sections of a Manuscript <ul><li>Results </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Figure legends should contain sufficient information to allow the figure to be understood; what kind of experiment was run, number of animals or experiments run, the nature of the data (e.g. means ± SE), etc. Figure legends should not comment on the data! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Don’t be afraid to admit that a certain, obvious experiment didn’t “work”. Rather, address possible reasons as to why it didn’t work. Otherwise, the reviewer will likely suggest that you perform it. </li></ul></ul>
  12. 12. Comments on Specific Sections of a Manuscript <ul><li>Discussion </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This should not be a rehash of the Results; it should discuss the findings in the context of past research </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Discussion should emphasize the contribution that the work presented makes to the scientific area, the significance of the work, etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>It should be focussed and as succinct as possible; longer isn’t better </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. Comments on Specific Sections of a Manuscript <ul><li>References </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Even if you use a reference manager, you still need to proofread the references to make sure they comply with the specific style required by the journal </li></ul></ul>
  14. 14. Submitting a Revised Manuscript <ul><li>Don’t always take a rejection as a rejection; read the letter from the editor carefully for an indication that there is hope </li></ul><ul><li>Rebuttal letter - be respectful, but don’t be afraid to indicate where the reviewer may have made a mistake, was wrong, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Clearly indicate in your rebuttal letter how you have addressed each and every point; make it easy for the reviewer to assess the revised manuscript without having to re-read the whole thing again </li></ul>

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