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Known knowns & unknown unknowns    Facilitating metacognition in the online classroom                  Dr. L. Roxanne Russ...
Ummm…Donald Rumsfeld?   What is metacognition?                 There are known knowns; there are things                 w...
Benefits of Metacognitive Strategies   For your courses     Increased material comprehension     Better alignment of re...
Online discussions Complaints & problems with online  discussion Praises & benefits of the online classroom
Benefits of Online discussions   In writing     Time to prepare     Record of learning stepping stones   Participation...
Be the expert, Think like a novice What have you learned recently? What was your  approach? What did you need? What st...
Discussion Mining   Focus on one or two objectives       Choose a learning goal   Mine the classroom     Misconception...
Introduction Strategies   Predicting outcomes       What information will you need to successfully        answer this di...
In-progress Strategies   Self-questioning       What question must you ask to continue this        process or solve this...
Wrap-up Strategies   Self-assessing learning       Rate your learning experience from 1-10. Why        did you give your...
Ideas   What thinking strategies are specific to your    discipline and course objectives?       e.g. the writing proces...
Barriers   What would make this approach difficult in    your online discussions?   How can you determine if the approac...
Benefits How could this approach improve student  learning? Could this approach save you time?
Implementing Determine learning goals Start weekly discussion threads       Establish high standards for participation ...
References   Seminal        Flavell, J. (1979). Metacognition and cognitive monitoring: A new area of cognitive-developm...
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Known knowns & unknown unknowns

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Facilitating metacognition in the online classroom

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Known knowns & unknown unknowns

  1. 1. Known knowns & unknown unknowns Facilitating metacognition in the online classroom Dr. L. Roxanne Russell, Georgia State University
  2. 2. Ummm…Donald Rumsfeld? What is metacognition? There are known knowns; there are things we know that we know. There are known unknowns; that is to say, there are things that we now know we dont know. But there are also unknown unknowns; there are things we do not know we dont know.
  3. 3. Benefits of Metacognitive Strategies For your courses  Increased material comprehension  Better alignment of responses to assignments  Better discussions  More clearly articulated arguments Lifelong  Increased ability to learn independently  Better critical thinking skills  Better interdiscpilinary application of knowledge
  4. 4. Online discussions Complaints & problems with online discussion Praises & benefits of the online classroom
  5. 5. Benefits of Online discussions In writing  Time to prepare  Record of learning stepping stones Participation requirements  Graded  Guided
  6. 6. Be the expert, Think like a novice What have you learned recently? What was your approach? What did you need? What stands out in your memory? Why?
  7. 7. Discussion Mining Focus on one or two objectives  Choose a learning goal Mine the classroom  Misconceptions  Preconceptions  Tangents  Epiphanies  Levels of confidence Backtrack from goal
  8. 8. Introduction Strategies Predicting outcomes  What information will you need to successfully answer this discussion question? Misconception/Preconception check  Use true/false or definitive statements to ask students to commit to knowledge or opinions
  9. 9. In-progress Strategies Self-questioning  What question must you ask to continue this process or solve this problem? What questions do you want to ask me or a peer about this process? Self-challenging  Allow choices, then question. Why did you make this choice? Easier or more challenging? If you could change your choice now, would you?
  10. 10. Wrap-up Strategies Self-assessing learning  Rate your learning experience from 1-10. Why did you give yourself this rating? Learning reflection  Have students examine all configurations  Knownknowns, known unknowns, unknown knowns, unknown unknown unknowns
  11. 11. Ideas What thinking strategies are specific to your discipline and course objectives?  e.g. the writing process, the scientific method, flow charts, logical reasoning When are different steps appropriate?  How do you determine? How could you teach students about these strategies and when to use them in your curriculum?
  12. 12. Barriers What would make this approach difficult in your online discussions? How can you determine if the approach is worth overcoming the barriers?
  13. 13. Benefits How could this approach improve student learning? Could this approach save you time?
  14. 14. Implementing Determine learning goals Start weekly discussion threads  Establish high standards for participation grading (provide rubrics & examples) Mine discussions Choose strategies to connect discussions to goals Experiment and redesign
  15. 15. References Seminal  Flavell, J. (1979). Metacognition and cognitive monitoring: A new area of cognitive-developmental inquiry.American Psychologist, 34, 906-911. Benefit Claims  Bransford, J., Brown, A., & Cocking, R. (1999). How people learn: Brain, mind, experience, and school. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.  Schneider, W., & Pressley, M. (1997). Memory development between two and twenty. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.  Weinstein, C.E., & Mayer, R. (1986). The teaching of learning strategies. In M.C. Wittrock (Ed.), Handbook of research on teaching (pp. 315-327). New York: Macmillan. Application  Darling-Hammond, L., Austin, K., Cheung, M., & Martin, D. (n.d.). Thinking about thinking: Metacognition. Retrieved July 30, 2009, from http://learner2.learner.org/courses/learningclassroom/support/09_metacog.pdf  Kuhn, D., & Dean Jr., D. (2004). Metacognition: A bridge between cognitive psychology and educational practice. Theory Into Practice 43(4), 268-273.  Paris, S., & Winograd, P. (1990). How metacognition can promote academic learning and instruction. In B.F. Jones & L. Idol (Eds.), Dimensions of thinking and cognitive instruction (pp. 15-51). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.  Pintrich, P.R., McKeachie, W.J., & Lin, Y. (1987). Teaching a course in learning to learn. Teaching of Psychology, 14, 81-86.  Pintrich, P.R., & Schunk, D.H. (2002). Motivation in education: Theory, research, and applications. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill Prentice-Hall.

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