Sections B1 - B5

295 views

Published on

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
295
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
6
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Sections B1 - B5

  1. 1. Recording Form Section B Location and Context Details
  2. 2. <ul><li>Completed for panels still in the landscape </li></ul><ul><li>Recording date </li></ul><ul><li>Landscape situation </li></ul><ul><li>Orientation and slope </li></ul><ul><li>Proximity to water </li></ul><ul><li>Underlying geology </li></ul><ul><li>Land use </li></ul><ul><li>Context </li></ul><ul><li>Location Sketch & Notes </li></ul>Section B1 – B5
  3. 3. Section B: Date
  4. 4. B1. Landscape Situation Information gathered in this section will assist researchers to look at topographical similarities & differences between sites at both regional and national level This section is a simplified version of the one used previously on NADRAP which had 15 choices. We’d welcome feedback
  5. 5. B1. Landscape Situation <ul><li>Terrain: Topography directly around the panel (approx 10m) but the wider landscape needs taking into account </li></ul><ul><li>Sloping - on a hillside, a crag, valley lip </li></ul>
  6. 6. Sloping
  7. 7. B1. Landscape Situation Terrain: Sloping Hangingstones Swastika stone Pipers Crag Stead Panorama Rocks area Pancake Rock Planets Rock Rombalds Moor(ish) Cross section S Green Crag Slack S Woofa Bank
  8. 8. B1. Landscape Situation Terrain: Sloping Pipers Crag Lanshaw area
  9. 9. B1. Landscape Situation <ul><li>Terrain: Topography directly around the panel (approx 10m) but the wider landscape needs taking into account </li></ul><ul><li>Sloping - on a hillside, a crag, valley lip </li></ul><ul><li>Flat - terrace, plateau, gentle slope, uneven but predominately flat ground </li></ul>
  10. 10. Flat
  11. 11. B1. Landscape Situation Terrain: Flat Ben Rhydding Nr Cow & Calf Hotel Rombalds Moor(ish) Cross section Green Crag Slack Woofa Bank Backstone Beck
  12. 12. Flat Woofa Bank Rombalds Moor(ish) Cross section
  13. 13. Flat Green Crag Slack
  14. 14. Flat Backstone Beck
  15. 15. Slope Flat
  16. 16. Flat Slope Flat Green Crag Slack
  17. 17. B1. Landscape Situation <ul><li>Terrain: Topography directly around the panel (approx 10m) but the wider landscape needs taking into account </li></ul><ul><li>Sloping - on a hillside, a crag, valley lip </li></ul><ul><li>Flat - terrace, plateau, gentle slope, uneven but predominately flat ground </li></ul><ul><li>Other – cave (likely to be our saviour category too) </li></ul>
  18. 18. B1. Landscape Situation <ul><li>Position: Topography of the wider landscape </li></ul><ul><li>Top - panel is at or close to the highest elevation in the area for example a hill top. </li></ul><ul><li>Middle - panel is moderately elevated for example on a hill or valley side (most panels on Rombalds fall into this category) </li></ul><ul><li>Bottom - valley floor </li></ul><ul><li>Other - ?? </li></ul>
  19. 19. B1. Landscape Situation Ilkley Keighley / Riddlesden Rombalds Moor Cross section Bottom Valley Floor Very few panels will fall into this category
  20. 20. B1. Landscape Situation Ilkley Keighley / Riddlesden Rombalds Moor Cross section Middle Panels in elevated positions, but not the highest part of the landscape Majority of panels on Rombalds will fall into the category Sample record Backstone Beck 06
  21. 21. B1. Landscape Situation Rombalds Moor Cross section Top Panels on, or very near the highest part of the landscape Only a small number of carvings will fall into this category <10 Ilkley Keighley / Riddlesden
  22. 22. B1. Orientation and Slope of Panel This section records the panels orientation, plus the ° slope/inclination and direction of the carved surface. Information gathered will again inform researchers of characteristics at site, regional and national level
  23. 23. B1. Orientation <ul><li>Preparation </li></ul><ul><li>Use the compass to identify where north is </li></ul><ul><li>Helpful to measure the panel to identify the long axis </li></ul><ul><li>Draw an outline of the panel over the compass wheel to fix the orientation to the cardinal points. </li></ul><ul><li>The panels shape can either be copied from the IAG drawing (preferred option) or drawn freehand </li></ul><ul><li>Draw a straight line to represent the direction of the longest axis, showing the main orientation of the panel </li></ul>
  24. 24. B1. Orientation and Slope of Panel
  25. 25. B1. Slope of Panel <ul><li>Record the slope of the carved surface relative to the horizontal (not the slope of the ground) </li></ul>
  26. 26. B1. Slope of Panel
  27. 27. B1. Slope of Panel <ul><li>Record the slope of the carved surface relative to the horizontal (not the slope of the ground) </li></ul><ul><li>If there are multiple carved surfaces sloping in different directions, don’t complete this section </li></ul>
  28. 28. B1. Slope of Panel – How to (1) <ul><li>If you have an inclinometer in your compass, turn the dial so that the little red arrow points to 0 on the interior scale when the long edge of the compass is on a horizontal surface. Make a straight edge parallel to the rock surface by resting a ruler or ranging pole lightly on the rock surface, and then hold your compass on the ranging pole so that the long edge of the compass is parallel with your straight edge. Read the number off the compass dial to get the inclination of the rock surface </li></ul><ul><li>or </li></ul><ul><li>Make a straight edge parallel to the rock surface with your ruler or ranging rod, and then extend a piece of string horizontally out from the rock surface (use a spirit level to ensure the string is horizontal). You can then use a protractor to measure the (smaller) angle between the horizontal string and the ruler or ranging rod. </li></ul>
  29. 29. B1. Slope of Panel – How to (2) Compasses at the ready;
  30. 30. B1. Slope of Panel <ul><li>Record the angle of the slope of the carved surface of the rock relative to the horizontal (not the slope of the ground). </li></ul><ul><li>If there are multiple carved surfaces sloping in different directions, don’t complete this section </li></ul>Read off the angle and either insert an X within the appropriate angle range, or ring the range
  31. 31. B1. Orientation of Slope <ul><li>Record the orientation of the slope from top to bottom </li></ul><ul><li>If multiple sloping surfaces nothing will be entered here, but can be mentioned in panel notes section B7 </li></ul>SE NW
  32. 32. B1. Proximity to water <ul><li>Why record the proximity to water: </li></ul><ul><li>Some researchers believe there is correlation between water and sites chosen for carving rocks and types of motifs </li></ul><ul><li>Panels are quite often very close to water sources such as springs </li></ul><ul><li>In the central Yorkshire area (W and N) rock art sites are generally placed on upland terraces above major rivers such as the Aire, Wharfe and Nidd </li></ul><ul><li>Caveat : Difficult to prove as people needed to drink </li></ul>
  33. 33. B1. Proximity to water <ul><li>What we’re recording (within 100m) </li></ul><ul><li>Springs </li></ul><ul><li>Water courses - rivers, becks, streams etc (not modern drainage or leats) </li></ul><ul><li>Fieldtrip Preparation </li></ul><ul><li>Check an OS Map or online map service such as; http:// magic.defra.gov.uk / (guidance sheet forthcoming) to see if springs are in the area you’re recording </li></ul><ul><li>Recording in the field </li></ul><ul><li>In the field measure distances (m) to water source using a tape (can be awkward due to the distances) </li></ul><ul><li>Use measurement tools on online applications such Google Earth or http://magic.defra.gov.uk/ (Guidance Sheet No13 forthcoming) </li></ul>
  34. 34. B1. Proximity to water
  35. 35. B1. Proximity to water Tick the appropriate boxes for the water sources Enter distance in metres
  36. 36. B1. Proximity to water <ul><li>What we’re recording (within 2km) </li></ul><ul><li>Lake/tarns - ponds, lakes, tarns (not modern reservoirs) </li></ul><ul><li>Fieldtrip Preparation </li></ul><ul><li>Check OS Map or online map services for nearest tarn etc </li></ul><ul><li>Recording in the field </li></ul><ul><li>Measure distances (m) to water source using a tape (can be awkward due to the distances) </li></ul><ul><li>Use measurement tools on online applications such Google Earth or http://magic.defra.gov.uk/ (guidance sheet 13 forthcoming) </li></ul>
  37. 37. B1. Underlying Geology Why is understanding geology important? An understanding of basic geology is essential for Rock Art Recording. An appreciation of the variety of natural geological forms allows identification of rock types, helps carved motifs to be distinguished from natural features, and provides a basis for assessing both the current condition and identification of potential threats to the rock surface (Guidance Sheet No.6) What is meant by Underlying Geology? The layer of rock nearest the surface
  38. 38. B1. Underlying Geology There are three main classes of rock; Igneous - a rock or mineral that solidified from molten or partly molten material e.g. Granite, Andesite, Basalt Sedimentary - Rock formed from accumulations of sediment, which may consist of rock fragments of various sizes, remains or products of animals or plants, products of chemical action or of evaporation, or mixtures of these e.g Sandstone, limestone, coal Metamorphic - Rock derived from pre-existing rocks by marked changes in temperature, pressure, shearing stress, and chemical environment, generally at depth in the Earth's crust e.g. marble, schist
  39. 39. B1. Underlying Geology In this area, the underlying geology is Sedimentary sandstone from the Millstone Grit Series which covers over 30 different types including Doubler Stones Sandstone, Longridge Sandstone, Addingham Edge Grit, East Carlton Grit. Complete fields as appropriate.
  40. 40. Geology Walk / Study <ul><li>An Introduction to the Geology of the Millstone Grit Series </li></ul><ul><li>Mike Short has kindly offered to lead two 2-hour guided field trips to Otley Chevin Forest Park Geology Trail </li></ul><ul><li>On </li></ul><ul><li>Wednesday 23rd February & Sunday 27th February 2011 </li></ul><ul><li>10:00am – 12:00noon </li></ul><ul><li>Aimed at </li></ul><ul><li>CSI volunteers who have limited or no knowledge of the geology of the ‘millstone grit’ and </li></ul><ul><li>also open to those volunteers with knowledge who have not visited the Chevin Forest Park Geology Trail </li></ul><ul><li>Email flyer will be sent out soon </li></ul>
  41. 41. B1. Current Land Use Current land use will aid the management and conservation of the panels i.e. a panel on M.O.D land may be in greater danger than one on moorland
  42. 42. B1. Current Land use Heathland/moorland – unenclosed land with rough grass, heather and/or bracken cover Undisturbed grassland – enclosed grassland not actively managed to improve the quality of the pasture Improved pasture – enclosed land improved through mechanisms which might include stone clearance, drainage etc Wood/forest – a plantation, or a natural/managed woodland or forest. Bog/marsh – a boggy or marshy area Arable – panel within or at the edge of an arable field or ploughed land. Urban – built environment including parkland, gardens, thoroughfare waste ground Military – land owned the MoD., e.g. for training. Conservation – area set aside for nature conservation, e.g. Woodland Trust or Nature Reserve (SSSI?) Other – please describe any other land uses not covered above .
  43. 43. B1. Current Land use <ul><li>Record details of current land use </li></ul><ul><li>Tick the most appropriate box even if two uses could be applied </li></ul><ul><li>Most rock art recorded for CSI will be Heathland / Moorland </li></ul><ul><li>Record details of current land use </li></ul><ul><li>Tick the most appropriate box even if two uses could be applied </li></ul><ul><li>Most rock art recorded for CSI will be Heathland / Moorland </li></ul>
  44. 44. B2. Prehistoric Features within 250m In this section record all the prehistoric features 250m around the panel. Some of the archaeological remains may be contemporary with the rock art and this data will allow further analysis and study of the panels context Don’t worry if you don’t know what these features are and what to look for, this will come in time with a mixture of training and experience You may find it easier to complete this section after the Location Sketch has been drawn (B4)
  45. 45. B2. Prehistoric Features within 250m <ul><li>Preparation </li></ul><ul><li>Check the IAG location notes they may contain details of features </li></ul><ul><li>You’ll be given copies of Scheduling Reports and HER records which detail other features </li></ul><ul><li>You can check enthusiast websites such as The Modern Antiquarian, The Megalithic Portal and The Northern Antiquarian for nearby sites, some sites might not be in official records yet </li></ul>
  46. 46. B2. Prehistoric Features within 250m <ul><li>For the Fieldwork </li></ul><ul><li>Walk around the area of the panel (250m if possible) and see how many features you can find (don’t forget HER, scheduling reports) </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss and agree with team members and tick the appropriate box </li></ul><ul><li>Remember, it may be helpful to complete this section after the sketch depending on the sketch scale </li></ul>
  47. 47. B3. Location Notes N.B. For Notes fields on the Recording Form we’re not expecting academic paper quality. The information should contain useful information which may assist researchers and heritage managers in the future The location notes are intended to give a general overview of the panels location, direction, landscape context and association with other features. Although this section appears before the Location Sketch (B4.) in the form, you may find it easier to produce the Notes after the sketch has been drawn
  48. 48. B3. Location Notes <ul><li>What should Location Notes they include </li></ul><ul><li>Add the IAG location notes (prior to fieldtrip) </li></ul><ul><li>Ensure brief directions to the panel are detailed including easily identifiable features such as walls, paths </li></ul><ul><li>Give a brief description of the surrounding topography </li></ul><ul><li>Archaeological context as detailed on the sketch (B4.) </li></ul><ul><li>Possibly features identified on B2. (prehistoric features) </li></ul><ul><li>Extent of views (today) </li></ul><ul><li>Prominent natural features that can be seen </li></ul><ul><li>You can complete in note format out in the field and fully write up later (but do them before you forget) </li></ul><ul><li>If you couldn’t locate panel, detail extent of search </li></ul><ul><li>Also see Guidance Sheet No.14 on Writing Notes </li></ul>
  49. 49. B3. Location Notes Further training will be forthcoming and time to practice during the Trial Phase !!
  50. 50. B4. Location Sketch A plan sketch detailing the area around the particular panel or area, showing the location and distances to other features The plan should be kept simple as there’s no requirement for a detailed archaeological survey using drawing conventions.
  51. 51. B4. Location Sketch <ul><li>Preparation </li></ul><ul><li>Have other records such as HER / Schedule Reports handy so you know which features should be in the area </li></ul><ul><li>Walk around the vicinity and identify all the features to record </li></ul><ul><li>From the features identified decide on the best scale to be applied on the plan grid </li></ul>
  52. 52. B4. Location Sketch Features that might be included

×