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Democratic Values in Planning

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This is an improved (and abridged) version of my old presentation on VALUES FOR PLANNING, where I discuss ideas related to the main framework given to us by the Enlightenment. NOTICE that this presentation was designed in times of Trump, President Bannon, fake news and "alternative facts", so in a way, it is a response to all this.

Published in: Design

Democratic Values in Planning

  1. 1. VALUES FOR PLANNING prepared by Roberto Rocco SPATIAL PLANNING AND STRATEGY, DELFT UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Delft University of Technology U URBANISM SPS spatialplanning&strategy
  2. 2. DEMOCRATIC VALUES LET’S EXPLORE
  3. 3. Liberty leading the people,Eugène Delacroix (1830)
  4. 4. is not an empty slogan rooted in a philosophical and scientific revolution
  5. 5. RATIONALITY the first system of government that was manifestly based on principles of rationality (not divine intervention)
  6. 6. Light emanates from TRUTH (the central figure), helped by SCIENCE and PHILOSOPHY on the right (this is the cover of l’Encyplopédie)
  7. 7. LIBERTYFRATERNITY EQUALITY emphasised by the rightemphasised by the left individualcommunity The promotion of justice
  8. 8. NEGATIVE RIGHTSPOSITIVE RIGHTS EQUALITY the right to be free from something (individual) the right to something (societal) The promotion of balance FRATERNITY LIBERTY These rights are NOT ABSOLUTE RIGHTS but are exclusive (albeit complementary)!
  9. 9. MY PLOT! LIBERTY? What liberty can you have if you are not in society? Here, I own a plot in the middle of the desert. I can build whatever I want on it, but what is the value of this?
  10. 10. DinoVabec NYC to LA MY PLOT! SOCIAL FUNCTION OF PROPERTY LIBERTY? How much liberty can you have when you live in society? Here, I can’t build whatever I want, but my plot is close to infrastructure, public space, other buildings. I can enjoy public goods!
  11. 11. PUBLIC GOODS A PUBLIC GOOD IS A PRODUCT THAT ONE INDIVIDUAL CAN CONSUME WITHOUT REDUCING ITS AVAILABILITY TO ANOTHER INDIVIDUAL, AND FROM WHICH NO ONE IS EXCLUDED.
  12. 12. PUBLIC GOODS ECONOMISTS REFER TO PUBLIC GOODS AS “NON-RIVALROUS" AND “NON-EXCLUDABLE." NATIONAL DEFENCE, SEWER SYSTEMS, PUBLIC PARKS AND OTHER BASIC SOCIETAL GOODS CAN ALL BE CONSIDERED PUBLIC GOODS.
  13. 13. SOURCE: HTTP://WWW.URBANCAPTURE.COM/20130819-AERIAL-DOWNTOWN-THE-HAGUE-THE-NETHERLANDS/?DOING_WP_CRON=1486758418.4101200103759765625000 PUBLIC GOODS The city of The Hague in the Netherlands offers many public goods to its inhabitants: clean air safety excellent mobility heathy environments green spaces etc.
  14. 14. INDIVIDUALCOMMUNITY PROMOTION OF BALANCE the private sectorcivil society FRATERNITY LIBERTY EQUALITY the public sector
  15. 15. PRIVATE SECTORCIVIL SOCIETY PUBLIC SECTOR GOVERNANCE
  16. 16. INFORMAL INSTITUTIONS THE RULE OF LAW ENTERPRISES (THE PRIVATE SECTOR) GOVERNMENT (THE PUBLIC SECTOR) COMMUNITY (CIVIL SOCIETY) The rule of law are the formal institutions that regulate the relationships between public sector, private sector and civil society.
  17. 17. Informal institutions are related to culture, values, practices, inherited worldviews, etc that influence the way in which formal institutions work. Some informal institutions can be quite negative, such as corruption, nepotism, patronage. Other are very positive: values of respect, openness, tolerance, etc
  18. 18. So? What is the role of planning, and of planners in democratic societies?
  19. 19. Crick, B. 2002. Democracy: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford, Oxford University Press. Currie, D. 1986. Positive and Negative Constitutional Rights. The University of Chicago Law Review, 53(3), 864-890 Dietz, T., et al. 2003. "The Struggle to Govern the Commons." Science 302(5652): 1907-1912. Munck, G. and J. Verkuilen 2002. "Conceptualizing and Measuring Democracy: Evaluating Alternative Indices." Comparative Political Studies 35(1): 5-34. Stiglitz, J. 2000. Formal and Informal Institutions. Social Capital: A Multifaceted Perspective. P. Dasgupta and I. Serageldin. Washington DC, World Bank: 59-70. References
  20. 20. Thanks for watching! Are there questions? if you have further questions, please write to r.c.rocco@tudelft.nl

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