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Ch12 instructor

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Ch12 instructor

  1. 1. © 2010 Thomson South-Western Instructor Only Version CHAPTER 12CHAPTER 12 BusinessBusiness PresentationsPresentations
  2. 2. Chapter 12, Slide 2Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Getting Ready for anGetting Ready for an Oral PresentationOral Presentation Know your purpose.  What do you want your audience to believe, remember, or do when you finish?  Aim all parts of your talk toward your purpose. © STOCKBYTE / GETTY IMAGES
  3. 3. Chapter 1, Slide 3Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Chapter 12, Slide 3Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Getting Ready for an Oral Presentation Identify your purpose Understand your audience Organize the conclusion Organize the body Organize the introduction
  4. 4. Chapter 12, Slide 4Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Getting Ready for anGetting Ready for an Oral PresentationOral Presentation Understand your audience.  Friendly, neutral, uninterested, hostile?  How to gain credibility?  How to relate this information to their needs?  How to make them remember your main points? © STOCKBYTE / GETTY IMAGES
  5. 5. Chapter 12, Slide 5Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Organizing ContentOrganizing Content Capture attention in the introduction.  Grab listeners’ attention and get them involved by opening with a promise, story, startling fact, question, quotation, relevant problem, self-effacing story, or some other tactic.  Identify yourself and establish your credibility.  Preview your main points.
  6. 6. Chapter 12, Slide 6Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Succeeding WithSucceeding With Four Audience TypesFour Audience Types  Friendly  Neutral  Uninterested  Hostile Click icon for more details. Adobe Acrobat 7.0 Document
  7. 7. Chapter 12, Slide 7Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  A Promise “By the end of my talk, you will . . . .”  Drama—tell a moving story; describe a problem.  Eye contact—command attention by making eye contact with as many people as possible. Ten Techniques for GettingTen Techniques for Getting Your Audience’s AttentionYour Audience’s Attention
  8. 8. Chapter 12, Slide 8Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Movement—leave the lectern area. Move toward the audience.  Questions—ask for a show of hands. Use a rhetorical question.  Demonstrations—include a member of the audience.  Samples, gimmicks—award prizes to volunteer participants; pass out samples. Ten Techniques for GettingTen Techniques for Getting Your Audience’s AttentionYour Audience’s Attention
  9. 9. Chapter 12, Slide 9Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Visuals—use graphics and other visual aids.  Dress—professional dress helps you look more competent and qualified  Appeal to the audience’s self-interest —audience members want to know, “What's in it for me?” Ten Techniques for GettingTen Techniques for Getting Your Audience’s AttentionYour Audience’s Attention
  10. 10. Chapter 12, Slide 10Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Organizing ContentOrganizing Content Organize the body logically.  Develop two to four main points. Streamline your topic and summarize its principal parts.  Arrange the points logically by a pattern.  Prepare transitions to guide the audience.  Have extra material ready. Be prepared with more information and visuals if needed.
  11. 11. Chapter 12, Slide 11Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Summarize in the conclusion.  Summarize your main themes.  Provide a final action-oriented focus that tells listeners how they can use this information or what you want them to do.  Include a statement that allows you to depart the podium gracefully and leaves a lasting impression. Organizing ContentOrganizing Content
  12. 12. Patterns for Organizing the Body of Your Presentation Pattern Example Chronology Describe the history of a problem, organized from the first sign of trouble to the present. Geography/ space Arrange a discussion of the changing demographics of the workforce by regions, such as East Coast, West Coast, and so forth. Topic/function/ conventional grouping Organize a report discussing mishandled airline baggage by the names of airlines.
  13. 13. Chapter 12, Slide 13Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Pattern Example Comparison/ contrast (pro/con) Compare organic farming methods with those of modern industrial farming. Journalism pattern Explain how identity thieves ruin your good name by discussing who, what, when, where, why, and how. Value/size Arrange a report describing fluctuations in housing costs by house value groups (houses that cost $100,000, $200,000, and so forth). Importance Organize from most important to least important the reasons a company should move its headquarters to a specific city.
  14. 14. Chapter 12, Slide 14Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Pattern Example Problem/ solution Discuss a problem followed by possible solutions. Simple/ complex Organize a report explaining genetic modification of plants by discussing simple seed production progressing to complex gene introduction. Best case/ worst case Analyze whether two companies should merge by presenting the best case result (improved market share, profitability, employee morale) opposed to the worse case result (devalued stock, lost market share, employee malaise).
  15. 15. Chapter 1, Slide 15Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Chapter 12, Slide 15Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Supporting Your Main Points* Type Use Comments Example Illustrate Clarify Add interest Introduce in groups of two or three. Consider preceding or following with relevant story. Story Prove point Illustrate Adapt to audience. Must support thesis. Control length. *Supplementary lecture. Not included in textbook.
  16. 16. Chapter 1, Slide 16Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Chapter 12, Slide 16Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Type Use Comments Quotation Prove point Add credibility Add interest Cite source. Paraphrase or read verbatim. Follow up with restatement or explanation. Comparison Improve understanding Add figurative interest Link familiar with unfamiliar. Be sure comparison or analogy is valid. Statistics Prove point Add credibility Link to audience needs. Use sparingly; round off. Support with visuals, handouts.
  17. 17. Chapter 12, Slide 17Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Worst- and best-case scenarios Worst- and best-case scenarios Personalized statistics Personalized statistics Personal anecdotes Personal anecdotes SimilesSimiles MetaphorsMetaphors AnalogiesAnalogies Building AudienceBuilding Audience Rapport withRapport with Effective ImageryEffective Imagery Building AudienceBuilding Audience Rapport withRapport with Effective ImageryEffective Imagery Building Rapport Like a ProBuilding Rapport Like a Pro
  18. 18. Chapter 12, Slide 18Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Building Rapport Like a ProBuilding Rapport Like a Pro Effective Imagery  Analogy – a comparison of something familiar with something unfamiliar To understand how the heart is divided, imagine a house with two rooms upstairs and two downstairs.
  19. 19. Chapter 12, Slide 19Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Building Rapport Like a ProBuilding Rapport Like a Pro Effective Imagery  Metaphor – an implied, nonliteral comparison The old office building became a money pit.  Simile – a comparison that includes the words like or as His mind works like a computer.
  20. 20. Chapter 12, Slide 20Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Building Rapport Like a ProBuilding Rapport Like a Pro Other Ways to Connect With Your Audience  Personal anecdotes  Personalized statistics  Worst- and best-case scenarios
  21. 21. Chapter 12, Slide 21Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Using Verbal Signposts to Transition As you can see, we have two primary reasons explaining . . . Summarizing Previewing Now let's look at three reasons for . . . My next major point focuses on . . . Let me review the two major factors I've just covered. . . Switching Directions I've just discussed three reasons for X. Now I want to move on to Y. Up to this point, I've concentrated on . . .; now let's look at another significant factor . . .
  22. 22. Chapter 12, Slide 22Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Sending PositiveSending Positive Nonverbal MessagesNonverbal Messages  Look professional.  Animate your body.  Punctuate your words.  Use appropriate eye contact.  Get out from behind the podium.  Vary your facial expressions.
  23. 23. Chapter 1, Slide 23Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Chapter 12, Slide 23Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Objects for demonstration Objects for demonstration VideoVideo Flipcharts or whiteboards Flipcharts or whiteboards HandoutsHandouts TransparenciesTransparencies Multimedia slides Multimedia slides Enhancing YourEnhancing Your PresentationPresentation With VisualWith Visual AidsAids Enhancing YourEnhancing Your PresentationPresentation With VisualWith Visual AidsAids
  24. 24. Chapter 12, Slide 24Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Pros Cons  Easy to prepare, update, and use  Readily available equipment  Easy to prepare, update, and use  Readily available equipment  May seem outdated  Holds speaker close to projector  Poor photo repro- duction  May seem outdated  Holds speaker close to projector  Poor photo repro- duction  Professional effect  Graphic options  Easy to make and update  Professional effect  Graphic options  Easy to make and update  Requires costly equipment and practice to use  Equipment may fail  Requires costly equipment and practice to use  Equipment may fail Medium Multimedia slides Multimedia slides TransparenciesTransparencies Characteristics of Visual AidsCharacteristics of Visual Aids
  25. 25. Chapter 12, Slide 25Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Encourages audience participation  Enhances recall  Encourages audience participation  Enhances recall  Risks unauthorized duplication and loss of audience control  Risks unauthorized duplication and loss of audience control  Inexpensive  Easy to create, modify, or customize on the spot  Inexpensive  Easy to create, modify, or customize on the spot  Requires talent  Difficult to see  Cumbersome to transport  Requires talent  Difficult to see  Cumbersome to transport Pros ConsMedium HandoutsHandouts Flipcharts or whiteboards Flipcharts or whiteboards Characteristics of Visual AidsCharacteristics of Visual Aids
  26. 26. Chapter 12, Slide 26Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Accurate portrayal of content  Suggests serious preparation  Accurate portrayal of content  Suggests serious preparation  Expensive to create and update  Incompatibility issues  Expensive to create and update  Incompatibility issues  Realistic effects  Increases audience participation  Realistic effects  Increases audience participation  Extra work and expensive to trans- port and replace  Limited use with large audience  Extra work and expensive to trans- port and replace  Limited use with large audience Pros ConsMedium VideoVideo PropsProps Characteristics of Visual AidsCharacteristics of Visual Aids
  27. 27. Chapter 12, Slide 27Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Preparing a Visually AppealingPreparing a Visually Appealing PowerPoint PresentationPowerPoint Presentation Analyze the situation and purpose.  Live presentation?  Self-running presentation?  Saved on server for anytime viewing? Analyze the situation and purpose.  Bold colors? Animation?  Sound effects? Bells and whistles?
  28. 28. Chapter 12, Slide 28Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Preparing a Visually AppealingPreparing a Visually Appealing PowerPoint PresentationPowerPoint Presentation Adapt your text and color selections.  6-x-6 rule: Maximum of six bullets per screen, six words per bullet  Combine harmonious colors, borders, bullet styles, and fonts.  Use light text on dark background for darkened rooms.  Use dark text on light background for lighted rooms.
  29. 29. Chapter 12, Slide 29Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Translate major headings into slide titles.  Use blueprint slides strategically.  Build bullet points with short phrases. Preparing a Visually AppealingPreparing a Visually Appealing PowerPoint PresentationPowerPoint Presentation Organize your slides.
  30. 30. Chapter 12, Slide 30Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Create a template to serve as background.  Avoid visual clichés; find a fresh template that complements your purpose.  Choose layout and design options. Compose your slideshow. Preparing a Visually AppealingPreparing a Visually Appealing PowerPoint PresentationPowerPoint Presentation
  31. 31. Chapter 12, Slide 31Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Alter layouts by repositioning, resizing, or changing fonts.  Consider adding variety and pizzazz but don’t overdo it.  Numeric information is easier to understand when shown in graphs and charts. Compose your slideshow. Preparing a Visually AppealingPreparing a Visually Appealing PowerPoint PresentationPowerPoint Presentation
  32. 32. Chapter 12, Slide 32Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Create a slide only if it • helps audience follow your ideas • highlights points you want audience to remember • introduces or reviews key points • provides a transition between points • illustrates and simplifies complex ideas. Compose your slideshow. Preparing a Visually AppealingPreparing a Visually Appealing PowerPoint PresentationPowerPoint Presentation
  33. 33. Chapter 12, Slide 33Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Use PowerPoint’s Slide Sorter View to rearrange, insert, and delete slides.  Edit wording to achieve parallel form.  Strive for conciseness and precision.  Check for spelling, grammar, and punctuation.  Are color choices visually appealing? Preparing a Visually AppealingPreparing a Visually Appealing PowerPoint PresentationPowerPoint Presentation Revise, proofread, and evaluate your slideshow.
  34. 34. Chapter 12, Slide 34Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Allow plenty of time to set up and test equipment.  Always bring backups.  Consider transferring your presentation to a CD or a USB flash drive.  Look at the audience, not the screen.  Do not read from a slide. Paraphrase. Preparing a Visually AppealingPreparing a Visually Appealing PowerPoint PresentationPowerPoint Presentation Use PowerPoint effectively.
  35. 35. Chapter 12, Slide 35Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Leave the lights as bright as possible.  Use a radio remote control to advance slides.  Use a laser pointer to highlight slide items.  Don’t rely totally on your slides. Remember that the audience came to see and hear you. Preparing a Visually AppealingPreparing a Visually Appealing PowerPoint PresentationPowerPoint Presentation Use PowerPoint effectively.
  36. 36. Chapter 12, Slide 36Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  If you are using a slideshow, practice thoroughly so that you can speak extemporaneously without notes.  If you are speaking without a slideshow, use notes but try to talk to the audience conversationally.  Beware of reading from a script: BORING! Polishing Your DeliveryPolishing Your Delivery and Following Upand Following Up Delivery Method
  37. 37. Chapter 12, Slide 37Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Stage Fright SymptomsStage Fright Symptoms  Dry throat  Unsteady voice  Trembling hands  Tied tongue  Wobbly knees  Stomach butterflies  Pounding heart  Shortage of breath  Sweaty palms
  38. 38. Chapter 12, Slide 38Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Combating Stage FrightCombating Stage Fright  Just before you begin to talk, take some deep breaths.  Convert your fear into anticipation and enthusiasm.  Select a familiar, relevant topic.  Prepare 150 percent.  Use positive self-talk.
  39. 39. Chapter 12, Slide 39Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Shift the focus from yourself to your visual aids.  Ignore stumbles; keep going.  Don't admit you're nervous.  Feel proud when you finish.  Reward yourself. Combating Stage FrightCombating Stage Fright
  40. 40. Chapter 12, Slide 40Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e Putting It All TogetherPutting It All Together During your presentation Before your presentation After your presentation
  41. 41. Chapter 12, Slide 41Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Prepare thoroughly.  Rehearse repeatedly.  Time yourself.  Dress professionally.  Check the room.  Greet members of the audience.  Practice stress reduction. Putting It All TogetherPutting It All Together AfterDuringBefore
  42. 42. Chapter 12, Slide 42Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e AfterBefore  Begin with a pause.  Present your first sentence from memory.  Maintain eye contact.  Control your voice and vocabulary.  Skip the apologies.  Incorporate pauses when appropriate During Putting It All TogetherPutting It All Together
  43. 43. Chapter 12, Slide 43Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e  Show enthusiasm.  Put the brakes on.  Move naturally.  Use visual aids effectively.  Avoid digression.  Summarize your main points. AfterBefore During Putting It All TogetherPutting It All Together
  44. 44. Chapter 12, Slide 44Mary Ellen Guffey, Essentials of Business Communication, 8e DuringBefore  Distribute handouts.  Encourage questions.  Repeat questions.  Reinforce your main points.  Keep control.  Avoid Yes, but answers.  End with a summary and appreciation. After Putting It All TogetherPutting It All Together
  45. 45. © 2010 Thomson South-Western Instructor Only Version ENDEND

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