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LOST IN
TRANSLATION
Looking for
Pippi
Longstocking
On the
screen/stage
US, 1988 Soviet Union, 1982
Toys, Games, Costumes, Pop
Culture
1950
United States
Translated by
Florence Lamborn
2007
US/Great Britain
Translated by
Tiina Nunnally
3 English Translation...
Looking for the voice of the
translator
Real Translator(Interpreting reader) Implied Reader
(original audience)
Implied tr...
Question:
Are the translations closer to
source text or target audience?
Examined culturally specific items
• money
• prop...
Original Lamborn
1950
Hurup 1954 Nunnally 2007
coffee
herring
coffee tea
fish
coffee
pepparkakor
rhubarb pie
pepparkakor g...
Translating Humor:
How do you translate wordplay, irony, puns, and convey
nuance?
“The purifying translation of wordplay w...
The burglars, when surprised by Pippi, ask her what
the clock says. She replies, “Big strong fellows like you,
and you don...
In the Lamborn translation, the clock says “tick
tack, tick tack.” – wordplay, as this version
depends upon knowing the Sw...
Pancake rhymes
Nu ska här bakas pannekakas,
Nu ska här vankas pannekankes,
Nu ska här stekas pannekekas.
(Lindgren, 1945)
...
Sounds
When Pippi has wet clothes after an outing, they make different sounds
“It says ‘klaf, klafs’ in my
dress and ‘squi...
Songs
Nunnally, 2007
Lamborn, 1950 Hurup, 1954
In the jolly summertime
Through field and wood I make my way.
I do exactly as I wish,
And when I...
AT SCHOOL
i is for . . .
Original Lamborn Hurup Nunnally Comic (Nunnally)
igelkott
(hedgehog)
ibex island iguana ivan the
...
AT THE CIRCUS
“surkas”
Original Lamborn Hurup Nunnally
Accent
present?
Yes No Yes yes
“broken
Swedish”
Phonetic depiction ...
“In a moment you vil behold the greatest marfel of our
time, the schtrongest man in the world, Schtrong Adolf,
who iss sch...
Shaun Tan’s tribute
to Pippi
(Upon receiving
the ALMA)
Lost in Translation: Searching for Pippi Longstocking
Lost in Translation: Searching for Pippi Longstocking
Lost in Translation: Searching for Pippi Longstocking
Lost in Translation: Searching for Pippi Longstocking
Lost in Translation: Searching for Pippi Longstocking
Lost in Translation: Searching for Pippi Longstocking
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Lost in Translation: Searching for Pippi Longstocking

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Comparison of three different English translations of Pippi Longstocking. How are they similar and different? Is one closer to the source text? What might be some of the reasons for these differences?

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Lost in Translation: Searching for Pippi Longstocking

  1. 1. LOST IN TRANSLATION Looking for Pippi Longstocking
  2. 2. On the screen/stage US, 1988 Soviet Union, 1982
  3. 3. Toys, Games, Costumes, Pop Culture
  4. 4. 1950 United States Translated by Florence Lamborn 2007 US/Great Britain Translated by Tiina Nunnally 3 English Translations 1954 Great Britain Translated by Edna Hurup
  5. 5. Looking for the voice of the translator Real Translator(Interpreting reader) Implied Reader (original audience) Implied translator Implied reader (target audience) -Emer O’Sullivan, Comparative Children’s Literature Communicative model of translation Author
  6. 6. Question: Are the translations closer to source text or target audience? Examined culturally specific items • money • proper names • food Issues in Translation
  7. 7. Original Lamborn 1950 Hurup 1954 Nunnally 2007 coffee herring coffee tea fish coffee pepparkakor rhubarb pie pepparkakor ginger snaps strawberries & cream ginger snaps kronor dollars pence kronor/öre meters yards/feet yards/feet metres schottische schottische polka polka Mr. Nilsson Mr. Nilsson Mr. Nelson Mr. Nilsson Villa Villekulla Villa Villekulla Villakulla Cottage Villa Villekulla Malin Malin Martha Malin Schtarke Adolph Mighty Adolf Mighty Adolf Schtrong Adolf
  8. 8. Translating Humor: How do you translate wordplay, irony, puns, and convey nuance? “The purifying translation of wordplay which contravenes linguistic rules is primarily influenced by educational norms in the target culture, but differing degrees of comic talent and linguistic creativity among translators are also factors.” –Emer O’Sullivan, Compartive Children’s Literature (which itself is translated from the German)
  9. 9. The burglars, when surprised by Pippi, ask her what the clock says. She replies, “Big strong fellows like you, and you don’t even know what a clock says? Who brought you up anyway? Haven’t you ever heard a clock before? A clock is a little round thingamajig that says “tick tock” and keeps going and going but never gets to the door. If you know any other riddles, let’s hear them.” (Nunnally, 2007) Tick-tock When the burglars take their leave, Pippi yells, “I’m not asking you to play tic-tac-toe! . . . But you could at least play along with my tick-tock riddle. I don’t know what makes you tick! But never mind, go in peace.”
  10. 10. In the Lamborn translation, the clock says “tick tack, tick tack.” – wordplay, as this version depends upon knowing the Swedish pronunciation of “tack” which is “tock.” “I don’t demand that you say ‘tack’ [thanks in Swedish], shouted Pippi after them, “but you could at least make an effort and say ‘tick.’ You haven’t even as much sense as a clock has.”
  11. 11. Pancake rhymes Nu ska här bakas pannekakas, Nu ska här vankas pannekankes, Nu ska här stekas pannekekas. (Lindgren, 1945) Lamborn, 1950 Hurup, 1954 Now we’re going to make a pancake, Now there’s going to be a pankee, Now we’re going to fry a pankye. Here pancakes will be baked now Here pancakes will be served now, Here pancakes will be fried now! Nunnally, 2007 Now it’s time to make Pancakes, Now it’s time to flip panclips, Now it’s time to shape panchapes!
  12. 12. Sounds When Pippi has wet clothes after an outing, they make different sounds “It says ‘klaf, klafs’ in my dress and ‘squish, squish in my shoes. Isn’t that jolly?” Lamborn, 1950“Hey , just listen to how it squishes when I walk!” “my clothes say ‘squish, squish ‘and my shoes say ‘slosh, slosh’.” Nunnally, 2007 “Listen to the skwuffling when I walk . . . It says ‘skwuff, skweep’ in my clothes and ‘skwipp, skwipp in my shoes.” Hurup, 1954
  13. 13. Songs Nunnally, 2007
  14. 14. Lamborn, 1950 Hurup, 1954 In the jolly summertime Through field and wood I make my way. I do exactly as I wish, And when I walk it goes squish, squish. Squish, squish. Squish, squish. And my old shoe— It’s really true – Sometimes says “chip” and sometimes “choo.” For the shoe is wet. The bull sleeps yet. And I eat all the rice pudding I can get. In the jolly summertime I squish wherever I go. Squish-oh! Squish-oh! When summer days are warm and still And I go over wood and hill I do exactly as I will And it drips as I go, Hi ho, hi ho! And in my shoes, Because I choose, It squelches just like orange juice Because the shoes are soaking wet. Ho, Ha, what a silly bull we met! And I – I do like chicken croquette! When summer days are warm and still, It drips as I go. Drip ho! Drip ho!
  15. 15. AT SCHOOL i is for . . . Original Lamborn Hurup Nunnally Comic (Nunnally) igelkott (hedgehog) ibex island iguana ivan the hedgehog
  16. 16. AT THE CIRCUS “surkas” Original Lamborn Hurup Nunnally Accent present? Yes No Yes yes “broken Swedish” Phonetic depiction of accent: Liddle girl, it is constink vive crones the front row and dree crones the back row and wan crones the zdandinkroom) “zeats” for seats & “schtanding” for standing (plus font is different) Miss Carmencita Miss Carmencita Senorita Carmeñcita “Horrible child!” “Derrible child” “You schtupid child!”
  17. 17. “In a moment you vil behold the greatest marfel of our time, the schtrongest man in the world, Schtrong Adolf, who iss schtill undefeated. And now, ladies and chentlemen, I give you Schtrong Adolf!” “Zo, ladies and chentlemen,” shouted the ringmaster, “iss there rrreally no one who vishes to earn a hundert kroner? Am I rrreally going to haff to keep the money all for myself?” “No, I rrreallly don’t think so,” said Pippi. -Nunnally, 2007 And now, ladies and chantelmen, I giff you a grrreat offer! Weech of you dares to try a wrestling match with Mighty Adolf, who dares to try to beat ze world’s strongest man)?” – Hurup, 1954
  18. 18. Shaun Tan’s tribute to Pippi (Upon receiving the ALMA)

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