Oer production processes, a quest for efficiency

853 views

Published on

Comparison of three production processes of OER on a set of characteristics. Presented @OpenEd 2010 in Barcelona

Published in: Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
853
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
64
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Collaborative. Global. Innovative. Experimental.
    Open content consistent with the University’s commitment to social justice and widening participation in Higher Education
    Our mission – open to people, places, methods and ideas. We aim for greater involvement in higher education by under-represented groups and empowerment for various support networks that work with them. Global reach, open source, user generated content, sharing resources to lower cost of course development – can contribute to resources in developing world.
    Quality distance learning materials and tools a great contribution to OER’s.
    A growing momentum behind open content through the internet. The world is moving towards open content. We are in a great position to research the way forward.
    Could be a test bed for new e-learning developments
    It could provide the basis for world-wide collaborations over the development and dissemination of supported open learning
    We may learn more about the University’s business model.
    Could be a way of building markets and reputation
    How… are we achieving this?
    Experimental action research
    12% budget on research. Running user trials and actively participating in the development of the website. Dissemintaing knowledge.
    Asking questions such as:
    “The power of many against the wisdom of experts… where will this take us in higher education? How do people learn from open content? Free and open rather than expensive and controlled – what is the implication for learning and learning insititutions. How to access knowledge not just acquire it. What are the new tools that will help us work and learn more effectively in the future?”
    Creative Commons
    Partners
    Working with others to include hard-to-reach groups and tackle educational disadvantage in more places – including our network of strategic partners, given we have a strong presence in widening participation and adult lifelong learning. Building on our open content work in developing countries.
    How can we help the developing world? Give people the ability to shape resources to match their needs.
    Funding
    Received funding from The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. $4.45 million (£2.54 million) towards the costs of the two year pilot which we expect to cost in the region of $9.9 million (£5.65 million).
    International reach – half our users from outside the UK, ability to translate and localise the materials, test new markets, improve brand awareness at a time when our expertise in distance education and technology is meeting widespread access to information through the internet and allowing us to reach learners in other countries more easily
    Some of projects include – Brazilian research partnership, Robin Mason’s EU-Asia link, TESSA, CORE, University in Catalyna, use in Thailand, University of the Small States of the Commonwealth, South African Management Development Institute, UN University, other global OER’s – France, japan, US, China, - oer commons, LabSpace projects in Guyana, Open Polytechnic of New Zealand, The Community Library of Australia
  • Oer production processes, a quest for efficiency

    1. 1. Production of OER A Quest for Efficiency Tina Wilson, OU UK Willem van Valkenburg, Delft University of Technology Robert Schuwer, Open Universiteit
    2. 2. Agenda • Introduction • Approach • Three cases • Conclusions
    3. 3. Introduction • Why this subject? – Process to create OER has to fit into your context – Efficiency is important – What characteristics determine efficiency of production of OER? • Only looking for characteristics specifically for OER and not for regular courses
    4. 4. Approach • Determine an initial set of characteristics – Analyzing OPAL description of projects – Wikiversity and WikiEducator • Describe three projects along the characteristics • Compare the projects – Variable: cost per course (labour costs are most important cost driver)
    5. 5. Types of OER processes Production process # Remarks Derived from existing regular “closed” course materials 31 Sometimes as part of the mainstream process and sometimes using a workflow additional to the mainstream process Additional “raw” materials from existing “closed” courses, but relatively easy to produce 7 E.g. videocasts or podcasts of classes Course materials especially produced for an OER repository 7 In most cases additional to the first mentioned scenario Other models 2 User generated materials Not described/not applicable 22 Not applicable: creating a portal or create communities
    6. 6. Case 1: OpenER • OU Nederland one of 14 universities in NL • with a specific Profile: Lifelong, Open, and Flexible (LOF) learning • over 20.000 students • Philosophy: OER is the ultimate form of openness for an Open University
    7. 7. OpenER project • Objectives: > lowering thresholds for access to formal HE > widening and increasing participation in HE • 2006-2008. Site launched on December 5, 2006 • 27 courses, mostly 1 ECTS size • Student centered (self learning materials)
    8. 8. Production process
    9. 9. Process characteristics Availability of existing (raw) materials Not in repository Availability of registration of IP for existing learning materials Yes Organisation of Quality Assurance QA by peer review Experience of course authors Very experienced Size and activities of the supporting staff department Small The degree in which the process is standardized or automated Low Consumers are able to add new content to the OER repository No A whole course can be divided in separate OER units Yes Type of OER created Mostly text (pdf). In some courses video (tailormade) and interactive elements. The publishing platform for OER eduCommons (different from platform for regular courses) Costs of development of a course (average, min, max) € 9,000 (€3,500 - €30,000) for a 25 hr course (total 27 courses).
    10. 10. Case 2: OpenLearn • The UK Open University has been developing high quality distance learning materials for 40 years, • ‘The philosophy of Open Content is entirely commensurate with The Open University’s mission to equalise access to high quality educational opportunities … particularly among educationally marginalised groups’. (Open Content Initiative, 2006; Appendix L and H).
    11. 11. OpenLearn • OpenLearn is funded by the William and Flora Hewlett foundation. • The site was launched on 25th Oct 2006 • OpenLearn – supports twin sites: - the LearningSpace – a supported open learning site for learners; and - the LabSpace – a supported community building site for creators
    12. 12. Models for transformation • The integrity model: very similar to original, as complete as possible, study as the original; • The essence model: source material cut back, keep essential features, text into shorter blocks; • The remix model: source material is starting point, redesigned for web delivery. Lane (2006) ‘From Pillar to Post: …’ http://kn.open.ac.uk/public/document.cfm?documentid=9724
    13. 13. Key stages of Integrity Model
    14. 14. Process characteristics Availability of existing (raw) materials Content (in most cases) was transformed from printed analogue texts from the digital version held in the OUUK production storage system. Availability of registration of IP for existing learning materials Yes Organisation of Quality Assurance QA in the LearningSpace was performed as extensive peer review and external examiner reporting. QA for learning materials in the LabSpace is performed by consumers instead of by the institution (on ‘dated’ material and uploaded content) Experience of course authors Very experienced Size and activities of the supporting staff department Originally a large team for setting up systems, now a small team The degree in which the process is standardized or automated High Consumers are able to add new content to the OER repository Yes A whole course can be divided in separate OER units Yes Type of OER created Mix of media including text (mostly in XML but some as pdf), images, video, audio, animations and simulations. The publishing platform for OER Twin Websites on a Moodle enhanced platform (although bespoke Drupal site being used for more recent third website) Costs of development of a course (average, min, max) On average approximately £3000 (€3600) (10 hrs study).
    15. 15. Case 3: Delft University of Technology • TU Delft is a traditional brick-and-mortar university in The Netherlands • 17,000 students and 5,000 staff "TU Delft is dedicated to finding sustainable solutions for social problems. The university's core tasks include delivering know-how and building knowledge networks in an international context. OpenCourseWare is one of the means by which we are contributing to this mission". Jakob Fokkema, former Rector Magnificus
    16. 16. TU Delft OpenCourseWare • Started in 2007 with 10 courses, now 40 courses • Courses are based on existing course material in Blackboard
    17. 17. Guidelines for our OCW-courses • Quality of the resources • Completeness • Copyright • Suitability for self-study Regular students profit from the enhancements as well
    18. 18. Process characteristics Availability of existing (raw) materials In Blackboard, not available for outside the university Availability of registration of IP for existing learning materials Yes Organisation of Quality Assurance QA by peer review Experience of course authors Varies between instructors Size and activities of the supporting staff department Small The degree in which the process is standardized or automated High Consumers are able to add new content to the OER repository No A whole course can be divided in separate OER units No Type of OER created Text (pdf) with video stream The publishing platform for OER Typo3 CMS Costs of development of a course (average, min, max) Bureau OpenER pays € 1000 per ECTS to the instructor. The instructor pays the student assistants. 1 ECTS stands for 28 hour. The bureau OpenER spends between 10 and 15 hours for a course. On average it is 3 hours per ECTS. Total average costs are € 1200 per ECTS.
    19. 19. Comparison • Characteristics having the most influence are (not surprising): – The part of the process that is automated. The more is automated, the less costs. – The size of the supporting staff – The type of OER created. The more interactive and multimedia elements, the higher the costs. However, the use of these technologies makes these course materials more accessible for a wider variety of learners.
    20. 20. More research • Are OER so special? Research regular course development? • Are the characteristics used the only ones? • Connect context of production to characteristics (contingency) Hondjevandirkje @ Flickr.com

    ×