"Uncovering CLIL", by Peeter Mehisto, DavidMarsh & Maria Jesus Frigols(2008) Macmillan. Practice II, Didactics. ETA Fullbr...
CLIL Achievement builders for CLIL:    Scaffolding    Anchoring into previous learning    Chunking    Repackaging Kno...
CLIL CLIL cannot be divorced from good practices in  education CLIL methodology:   Standard good practices in education...
Building Scaffolds Scaffolding: A temporary supporting structure that  students learn to use and to rely on, in order to ...
Scaffolding Scaffolding can be built by:    Teachers    Other learners    Parents    Members of the community
Some examples of scaffolding strategies include(see text for full list):  Initially providing reinforcement for attemptin...
Example of Scaffolding 1) Teacher models for the class how to do the assignment 2) Students help teacher work through a s...
Anchoring into previous learning Our existing knowledge base and our current level of  understanding provide a foundation...
Example of Anchoring:Brainstorming Brainstorming: Free association    Words or phrases    Can be used to create       ...
Chunking and Repackaging Knowledge Breaking big pieces of information into smaller chunks  helps students succeed Averag...
Chunking Strategies Questions aimed at understanding parts of material Graphic organizers Charts Graphs Mind maps Di...
Opening windows for personal achievement practicaii
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Opening windows for personal achievement practicaii

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Opening windows for personal achievement practicaii

  1. 1. "Uncovering CLIL", by Peeter Mehisto, DavidMarsh & Maria Jesus Frigols(2008) Macmillan. Practice II, Didactics. ETA Fullbright Kendra Dickinson (2012)
  2. 2. CLIL Achievement builders for CLIL:  Scaffolding  Anchoring into previous learning  Chunking  Repackaging Knowledge  Creative Thinking  Critical Thinking  Challenging students to step outside their comfort zones
  3. 3. CLIL CLIL cannot be divorced from good practices in education CLIL methodology:  Standard good practices in education  Features that are unique to CLIL
  4. 4. Building Scaffolds Scaffolding: A temporary supporting structure that students learn to use and to rely on, in order to achieve learning outcomes Scaffolding allows students to:  Access previously acquired knowledge  Analyse their knowledge  Process new information  Create new relational links  Take their understanding several steps further  Better understand the learning process  Build momentum  Save time  Enjoy short-term success
  5. 5. Scaffolding Scaffolding can be built by:  Teachers  Other learners  Parents  Members of the community
  6. 6. Some examples of scaffolding strategies include(see text for full list):  Initially providing reinforcement for attempting to speak, then for partially right answer, then for the right answer  Explaining a point using the register of language used by the students  Shortening sentences  Using pictures and realia  Breaking material into chunks  Giving clues and asking follow-up questions
  7. 7. Example of Scaffolding 1) Teacher models for the class how to do the assignment 2) Students help teacher work through a similar assignment 3) Students do a similar assignment in groups 4) Students work independently*Here students could work on thinking of a way to providing scaffolding for teaching, for example, the days of the week to children
  8. 8. Anchoring into previous learning Our existing knowledge base and our current level of understanding provide a foundation and anchor for new learning This applies to:  Content  Language Language and content acquisition go hand in hand
  9. 9. Example of Anchoring:Brainstorming Brainstorming: Free association  Words or phrases  Can be used to create  Lists  Word banks  Webs  Diagrams  Diamond  Fishbone organizer Common practice in CLIL Used to come up with new ideas, also allows students to use language to explain why they feel certain words/ideas are relevant
  10. 10. Chunking and Repackaging Knowledge Breaking big pieces of information into smaller chunks helps students succeed Average person can hold no more than seven pieces of information in their short-term working memory When oral or written material is presented in “chunks,” or groups of information, students can better absorb information
  11. 11. Chunking Strategies Questions aimed at understanding parts of material Graphic organizers Charts Graphs Mind maps Diagrams Webs Pictures

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