Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Career paralysis (pt 2) - untangling your thoughts and finding your direction

16,762 views

Published on

This is part 2 of a 2 part presentation is for anyone who feels stuck in their current job but unsure of how to move forward. Career paralysis is incredibly common and in this presentation Chartered Psychologist Rob Archer explains why - and what you can do about it.

Contains loads of brilliant free resources for anyone who wants to get unstuck and move forward in a meaningful direction.

www.thecareerpsychologist.com

Published in: Career, Technology, Spiritual
  • Well done, also...GROW YOU DOWNLINE OVERNIGHT - Works with any mlm. Have dozens joining whatever mlm your doing today! Go to: www.mlmrc.com
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here

Career paralysis (pt 2) - untangling your thoughts and finding your direction

  1. 1. © The Career Psychologist Career Paralysis Part 2: How to get unstuck and find your best direction. Part 2 of a presentation designed to be downloaded and viewed in ‘slide show’ mode, by psychologist Rob Archer. (Not viewed by me – viewed by you. I just created it). © Rob Archer
  2. 2. © The Career Psychologist Hello there! Good to see you again.
  3. 3. © The Career Psychologist Hello there! Good to see you again. Now, where were we? Oh yes...
  4. 4. © The Career Psychologist In part 1 we presented the idea of Career Paralysis: a feeling of wanting to change career, but getting paralysed by our mind’s biases that keep us exactly where we are.
  5. 5. © The Career Psychologist Changing career is about more than looking at jobs ads and then wondering why we didn’t think of starting Innocent.
  6. 6. © The Career Psychologist It’s also about the way we think. After all, it’s our usual thought processes that got us stuck in the first place, yet we rely on the same ones to get us unstuck…. Changing career is about more than looking at jobs ads and then wondering why we didn’t think of starting Innocent. It’s therefore likely that if being stuck was purely a logical problem, you’d already have solved it.
  7. 7. © The Career Psychologist It’s also about the way we think. After all, it’s our usual thought processes that got us stuck in the first place, yet we rely on the same ones to get us unstuck. It’s therefore likely that if being stuck was purely a logical problem, you’d already have solved it. Changing career is about more than looking at jobs ads and then wondering why we didn’t think of starting Innocent. The purpose of this presentation is to explain how. So to get unstuck we need to think differently, not harder. Unless we want to repeat our mistakes, we must understand the traps of human decision making and counter our brain’s cognitive biases.
  8. 8. 1 Suggested action: Identify clear decision criteria Last time: Too much choice can be overwhelming.
  9. 9. © The Career Psychologist Career choice can be overwhelming
  10. 10. © The Career Psychologist Identify clear and objective decision criteria to make decisions against. So to prevent all options looking the same...
  11. 11. © The Career Psychologist This means OBJECTIVELY identifying your skills, strengths, interests, personality preferences, and values. Then turning these into decision criteria with which you can evaluate your job options.
  12. 12. © The Career Psychologist Towards values ? Away from discomfort Note: make sure your criteria are not just ways of avoiding short term discomfort! e.g. “I want to feel happier” ‘I want to feel happier’ isn’t good enough. Now go to your room.
  13. 13. © The Career Psychologist Towards values ? Away from discomfort Note: make sure your criteria are not just ways of avoiding short term discomfort! e.g. “I want to feel happier” ‘I want to feel happier’ isn’t good enough. Now go to your room. Short term feelings can be poor indicators of long term value. Try to articulate values you want to stand for.
  14. 14. © The Career Psychologist Try this excellent (free) personality test to generate criteria. (But note personality tests need to be used in context!) Read about effective decision making models here (look – some people like this kind of thing). You may have to download this presentation and view in ‘slide show’ mode for these links to work. Identifying Decision Criteria...some ideas: Try our values exercise here or a whole list of them here.
  15. 15. 2 Suggested action: Identify your strengths Last time: We are negatively biased.
  16. 16. © The Career Psychologist It’s natural to think negatively BUT
  17. 17. © The Career Psychologist You should simultaneously gain clarity about your achievements and visualise them in detail.
  18. 18. © The Career Psychologist Becoming fluent in our strengths can help redress the balance.
  19. 19. © The Career Psychologist Try our free Identify your strengths exercise. Take Martin Seligman’s free signature strengths test. Learn about Appreciative Inquiry (and answer some powerful questions) here. Identifying Strengths...Here’s how:
  20. 20. 3 Last time: We prioritise the short term over the long term. Suggested action: Clarify your long term values
  21. 21. © The Career Psychologist In some ways, reaching our goals is the easy bit. Climbing the career ladder can be very exciting…
  22. 22. © The Career Psychologist But less so if it’s the wrong ladder.
  23. 23. © The Career Psychologist Helen Keller was once asked if there was anything worse than losing one’s sight.
  24. 24. © The Career Psychologist Helen Keller was once asked if there was anything worse than losing one’s sight. ‘Yes’, she replied. ‘Losing one’s vision’. What’s your vision?
  25. 25. © The Career Psychologist A vision is about working out how you will contribute to the world. We’re used to thinking in terms of what a job will give us. But if you’ve already done some thinking about your qualities it may be time to think about how these can – wait for it - make a difference to the world. That’s not as fluffy as it sounds. We’re not suggesting you have to heal the world. It’s just that meaning in life can’t be found in isolation. It’s like the meaning of a word. We may understand an individual word, but its true meaning is only found in the context of a sentence. So how will you use your talents? What do you want to contribute to the world? We’re not talking about sacrificing your own interests, but if this is only about your interests, the results will feel meaningless*. It’s the same when we try to understand our lives… It’s great to reflect on our strengths and skills in isolation, but these only have any meaning when applied to a particular cause or context * Unless you are a psychopath!
  26. 26. © The Career Psychologist We’re not here for long... So what’s your purpose? How do you want to be remembered?
  27. 27. © The Career Psychologist How will you contribute to the world?
  28. 28. © The Career Psychologist Try this purpose generator exercise. (Note: you have to log in first). Learn more about values here, or the Valued Living Questionnaire. Try the Heroes exercise to further explore values. Explore Roman Krznaric’s outrospection blog here or read his excellent book. Clarifying a vision...some ideas:
  29. 29. 3 Last time: We think in linear patterns. Suggested action: Think creatively about your options
  30. 30. © The Career Psychologist Our present culture of careers advice encourages us to think in terms of what we’ve done in the past. Then people ask us about our experience. The first thing we do is write up a CV. We think in terms of fitting our past to a role. Yet we ignore our longing to do something more meaningful in future.
  31. 31. © The Career Psychologist Our present culture of careers advice encourages us to think in terms of what we’ve done in the past. Then people ask us about our experience. The first thing we do is write up a CV. We think in terms of fitting our past to a role. Yet we ignore our longing to do something more meaningful in future. And no one even seems interested in our swimming badges.
  32. 32. © The Career Psychologist Our present culture of careers advice encourages us to think in terms of what we’ve done in the past. Then people ask us about our experience. The first thing we do is write up a CV. We think in terms of fitting our past to a role. Yet we ignore our longing to do something more meaningful in future. And no one even seems interested in our swimming badges. We’re encouraged to think in a linear way from the past to the future, and that’s a trap.
  33. 33. © The Career Psychologist After all, if you think the way you always think, you’ll probably get what you always get.
  34. 34. © The Career Psychologist Instead, examine each aspect of your life in isolation.
  35. 35. © The Career Psychologist By looking closely at something closely you will usually see it in a different light.
  36. 36. © The Career Psychologist Why you work (motivations) What type of work appeals (sectors and fields) Who you wish to be at work (roles) Where you want to work (geographies) How you wish to work (working conditions) Which types of organisations appeal (organisations) You could examine:
  37. 37. © The Career Psychologist …if you had 3 lives? …if you won £10 million and still had to work? What would you do… …if you had no fear or knew you could not fail? …if you could be the person you most admire… Whose job would you try out? …if you had 10 years to live?
  38. 38. © The Career Psychologist Enter your preferences into the O*Net website – it will suggest careers to consider. Download our presentation How to think creatively about your career and read about creativity. See what answers you receive in your 180 degree feedback exercise (download it here). Identify a bold move to get into action – this should generate further options. Creatively Generating Options...some ideas:
  39. 39. 4 Last time: We trust our minds to fix the problem. Suggested action: Keep thoughts in perspective
  40. 40. © The Career Psychologist “There are no great jobs out there” Let’s examine the thought:
  41. 41. © The Career Psychologist But what is the real function of this thought? “There are no great jobs out there” Let’s examine the thought: We could spend plenty of time arguing whether this thought is really true or false….
  42. 42. © The Career Psychologist Is the function: Or reduce your feelings of uncertainty? To describe the literal truth?
  43. 43. © The Career Psychologist Or reduce your feelings of uncertainty? To spur you on? Or to comfort yourself? Is the function: To describe the literal truth?
  44. 44. © The Career Psychologist Is the thought moving you towards your values, or simply trying to keep you safe from uncomfortable feelings? After all, if there are no great jobs then there is nothing for you to do – there is no point even trying. Psychologically, this could be a relief – but it could also ensure you never take action, which will keep you stuck.
  45. 45. © The Career Psychologist Even in the event there really are ‘no jobs’, you still have choices to make. If you don’t make those choices consciously, you’ll be making them unconsciously. After a while, no decision becomes the decision! Here’s another thought:
  46. 46. © The Career Psychologist By the way….
  47. 47. © The Career Psychologist This is also really bad advice. By the way….
  48. 48. © The Career Psychologist Instead of trying to control your thoughts, or alter how you feel, it would be better to focus on getting into action. Thoughts and emotions tend to follow, some way behind. Although it’s nice to have positive thoughts, in general research suggests that our thoughts and emotions are hard to control - and the harder we try the worse we get (trying harder to get to sleep is a good example).
  49. 49. © The Career Psychologist We think that the key to successful career change is knowing what we want to do next and then using that knowledge to guide our actions. But change usually happens the other way round. Doing comes first, knowing second. Herminia Ibarra, Working Identity
  50. 50. © The Career Psychologist We have the choice to live a life in which we do the things that are really important to us.
  51. 51. © The Career Psychologist But the admission price is often negative thoughts and emotions. We have the choice to live a life in which we do the things that are really important to us.
  52. 52. © The Career Psychologist *If it helps at all, I carry most of these balloons with me every day. But because I feel my direction is meaningful, I’m willing to do so. The Really Big Question: Can you be willing to experience your thoughts and feelings as they are, if it means doing what you really value in life? *
  53. 53. © The Career Psychologist Download our workbook in Cognitive Defusion and Willingness. Read further about the science behind this presentation. Get our recommended book list here and a list of free career resources here. Get into action with the Mindfulness and Willingness Exercises we’ve run at the School of Life. Preparing For Action...some ideas:
  54. 54. © The Career Psychologist Goodbyes are hard. If you’ve followed this Career Paralysis presentation from the start well it’s like we’re old friends. But what if the hoped-for nugget of wisdom has not materialised? What if you still feel stuck? Well, we understand your frustration. But now is the time for action, not thinking. Could you be willing to get into action despite not feeling certain? So, what now? 1. Try the exercises in this presentation. They will inch you forward and build momentum if you let them. There probably isn’t a better way of starting, plus they’re all completely free. 2. Get in contact with The Career Psychologist. After all, we may be able to point you in the right direction. Or you could follow our blog, Headstuck for some further inspiration. 3. Keep moving. Remember you are not alone. Plenty of people have beaten career paralysis and found meaning in their careers. Your noisy mind - with its worries and doubts - is just doing what it evolved to do, i.e. keep you safe. But if you can bear to keep moving forward, even in the presence of doubt, then your days of stuckness will be numbered.
  55. 55. © The Career Psychologist By making conscious choices based on your strengths and values and using them for a clear purpose, you can find meaning in your career. That’s not wishful thinking.
  56. 56. © The Career Psychologist It’s the clearest reality there is.
  57. 57. © The Career Psychologist The Career Psychologist is a careers consultancy based in London. We offer coaching, consultancy, training and assessment to help individuals improve their careers for the better.
  58. 58. © The Career Psychologist Thank you for reading! info@thecareerpsychologist.com @RobACareerPsych thecareerpsychologist.com

×