Obituary Exercise - The Career Psychologist

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Psychologist Rob Archer outlines the Obituary exercise, which helps people to clarify their values and explore what's really important to them in their life.

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Obituary Exercise - The Career Psychologist

  1. 1. © The Career Psychologist Write your own obituary And bring what matters to life…
  2. 2. © The Career Psychologist Thinking about death is a good way to understand what matters to us in life. Exercise: Write Your Own Epitaph How to do it 1. Start off with your name and a manner of death you’d be happy with. Try ‘died peacefully in her sleep aged 118’ or ‘whilst wrestling an alligator aged 89’. 2. Reference a list of your main accomplishments. 3. List the people you will be leaving behind, and those who will miss you the most. 4. Mention the people you helped. 5. Identify the main questions that life asked you, and how you responded. 6. Write about the type of person you were – how you will be remembered and what you stood for in life. 7. Write it in a style that reflects the type of person you were – let go! After all, you’re already dead! 8. 1 side of A4 is fine.
  3. 3. © The Career Psychologist If it helps, you could consider these further questions… What kind of obituary would you hate to write?
  4. 4. © The Career Psychologist What did you stand for when things got tough?
  5. 5. © The Career Psychologist Who was the real you, all along?
  6. 6. © The Career Psychologist What decisions did you make about the direction of your life that made you proud?
  7. 7. © The Career Psychologist What did your choices say about what mattered to you?
  8. 8. © The Career Psychologist How will you be remembered now you’re gone?
  9. 9. © The Career Psychologist Thanks for reading! info@thecareerpsychologist.com @RobACareerPsych thecareerpsychologist.com facebook.com/thecareerpsychologist/ The Career Psychologist is an independent psychology consultancy based in London helping people to transform their careers.

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