Rolling News - Breaking News

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Slides used for Level 3 undergrad media ethics class

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Rolling News - Breaking News

  1. 1. 1  Rolling with the punches The impact of 24-hour news channels11:00 BREAKING NEWS #med312 #mac373 @rob_jewitt robert.jewitt@sunderland.ac.uk
  2. 2. 2 Overview 1. Changing news environment 2. Role of 24 hour news 3. Breaking news11:01 BREAKING NEWS #med312 #mac373 @rob_jewitt robert.jewitt@sunderland.ac.uk
  3. 3. 3Key reading
  4. 4. LIVE Sunderland 4BREAKING NEWSCOURSEWORK 2Essay questions placed in SunSpace by Module Leader 11:06 claims • Unconfirmed reports of recommended readings • Students “doubtful” a
  5. 5. 5 Changing news environmentSince 1989 Since 1788
  6. 6. 6 Changing news environment the scoop  live blogging the exclusive  scrolling tickertapes the thirst to be first  social media
  7. 7. 7 Tickertape Live updatesReader responses Live updates
  8. 8. 8 Changing news environment ‘‘The approach to the delivery and packaging of news has altered with the passage of time, and the shape of the media in the 21st century is quite different from how it was 40 years ago . . . [news] values will vary from medium to medium, and from each individual package to the next’’  Brighton & Foy, 2007: p. 29
  9. 9. 9Changing news environment
  10. 10. 10 Changing news environment When the news of an outrage comes through, information about it will inevitably be incomplete. Some of it will be inaccurate. Communication systems will be overloaded. Decision-makers use every available source of information – including the rolling news programmes, which do a remarkable job in these circumstances  Jack Straw, 2010
  11. 11. 11Changing news environment
  12. 12. 12 Role of 24-hour news channels ‘an apparently endless flow, always available and never pausing’  (Marriott, 2007: 51)
  13. 13. 13 Role of 24-hour news channels If the latest FTSE figures are down or NASDAQ’s numbers are up, if a football ... transfer has just gone through, or if a court case has been decided … a steady stream of on-screen headlines will keep viewers up to speed. And while these may be just the merest snippets of information, what 24-hour news channels are promoting is the instant and continuous news update  (Cushion, 2012: 63-64)
  14. 14. 14 Role of 24-hour news channels Share of total viewing (%) Dec 2011 Jan 2012 Feb 2012BBC News 1 1 1Sky News 0.6 0.6 0.6Al-Jazeera English <0.1 <0.1 <0.1Sky Sports News 0.6 0.7 0.7 Source: BARB
  15. 15. 15 Role of 24-hour news channels Share of total viewing (%) Jan 2013 Feb 2013 Mar 2013BBC News 1.1 1.1 1.1Sky News 0.6 0.7 0.7Al-Jazeera English 0.1 <0.1 <0.1Sky Sports News 0.8 0.6 0.5 Source: BARB
  16. 16. 16Role of 24-hour news channels
  17. 17. 17Role of 24-hour news channels
  18. 18. 18 Role of 24-hour news channels The criticisms most frequently levelled at rolling news are that it is repetitive, that it is too speculative, that it relies too much on the two-way between presenter and reporter, and that it puts more emphasis on speed than accuracy  Brighton & Fey, 2007: 94
  19. 19. 19Role of 24-hour news channels
  20. 20. 20Bulletins vs rolling news: the live two-way Time allocated to news types as % BBC News 24 Sky News ITV 24 Hour 10 O’Clock News News Live reporting 25.4 19.5 11.3 7.3 Anchor 24.7 25 32.4 6.5
  21. 21. 21Bulletins vs rolling news: the live two-way
  22. 22. 22Speed and spectacle
  23. 23. 23 Speed and spectacle A shift in resources and priorities towards the provision of every and any live picture to feed the rolling news channels, and away from video journalism about otherwise poorly covered topics, which once might have contributed to a more contextualised, deeper, and broader reporting by broadcasters  Patterson, 2010: 111
  24. 24. 24Speed and spectacle
  25. 25. 25Breaking news
  26. 26. 26Breaking news
  27. 27. 27 Breaking news BBC News Channel should aim to deliver breaking news first and, wherever possible, immediately but not to the detriment of accuracy.  BBC News Channel licence conditions (Feb, 2012)
  28. 28. 28 Breaking news It should offer a service of regular updates on breaking stories and there should be significant live coverage. But the distinctiveness of BBC News Channel should lie in its ambition to offer a broad, varied, serious and analytical news agenda with strong coverage of the UK, from across the UK and from the rest of the world.  BBC News Channel licence conditions (Feb, 2012)
  29. 29. 29 Symbolic[s] More than 80% of breaking news stories are studio- based with stories coming from the news wires  Cushion and Lewis, 2009
  30. 30. 30 Symbolic[s] ‘Sky News customers know that we are only a heartbeat away from breaking news’  head of Sky News, John Ryley (2006)
  31. 31. 31Topic 2004 2007Business/consumer news 8 8Crime 14 27Celebrity/sport/human interest 6 10Politics 9 8Accidents/disasters 6 20Terrorism 27 9Socio-economic issues 8 4Iraq 12 3Other war/conflict 8 10International law/diplomacy 2 1Per cent of breaking news topics covered by Sky news and the BBC News channel(Source: Cushion, 2012)
  32. 32. 32Topic 2004 2007Business/consumer news 8 8Crime 14 27Celebrity/sport/human interest 6 10Politics 9 8Accidents/disasters 6 20Terrorism 27 9Socio-economic issues 8 4Iraq 12 3Other war/conflict 8 10International law/diplomacy 2 1Per cent of breaking news topics covered by Sky news and the BBC News channel(Source: Cushion, 2012)
  33. 33. 33Symbolic[s]
  34. 34. 34 Contradiction? The BBC is committed to achieving due accuracy. This commitment is fundamental to our reputation and the trust of audiences, which is the foundation of the BBC. It is also a requirement under the Agreement accompanying the BBC Charter In news and current affairs content, achieving due accuracy is more important than speed  BBC editorial guidelines
  35. 35. 35 Contradiction? … go back to basics. Report on the news … The term reporter is the noblest in the language, not this term ‘correspondent’. Increasingly, reporters are being invited by reporters to give their opinion. Far too much opinion is creeping into news reporters … to steer the viewer into what to think. Let them make up their own minds on the facts  Peter Sissons cited in Cushion, 2012: 82
  36. 36. 36 Summary  the need for speed has resulted in the softening of news reporting  the strive to be live has resulted in conjecture replacing fact  mix the role social media plays?11:50 BREAKING NEWS #med312 #mac373 @rob_jewitt robert.jewitt@sunderland.ac.uk
  37. 37. 37 Tickertape Live updatesReader responses Live updates
  38. 38. 38 Following the Boston marathon explosions: Do you think it’s appropriate to cover the London marathon event live? How would you plan for live coverage?  What would you take into account?  How would you frame it? How might you utilize social media and what lessons can be learned from Boston?
  39. 39. 39 Questions? To what extent does ‘going live’ assist viewers understandings of news events and what are the implications of an emphasis on spectacle over substance? Does it matter who is first with breaking news? What are the potential pitfalls of an increased emphasis on immediacy? How might the type of journalism fêted by the rolling news networks impact on the broader culture on news delivery (eg print, radio, online, etc)? Should rolling news providers be subject to more stringent safeguards (eg health warnings for news, increased statuary regulation?) in relation to the coverage of breaking news stories?
  40. 40. 40 Work cited and further reading Paul Brighton and Dennis Foy (2007) News Values, London: Sage. Stephen Cushion (2012) Television Journalism, London: Sage Stephen Cushion & Justin Lewis (2010) The Rise of 24 Hour News Television, New York: Peter Lang Justin Lewis & Stephen Cushion (2009) ‘The Thirst To Be First’, Journalism Practice, 3:3, 304-318 Justin Lewis, Stephen Cushion and James Thomas (2005) ‘Immediacy, Convenience or Engagement? An analysis of 24-hour news channels in the UK’, Journalism Studies 6 (4), pp. 461-77. Stephanie Mariott (2007) Live Television: Time, Space and the Broadcast Event, London: Sage Media Guardian (2005) ‘“We Had 50 Images Within an Hour’’’ www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2005/jul/11/mondaymediasection.attackonlondon Chris Patterson (2010) ‘The Hidden Role of Television Agencies: “Going Live” on 24-Hour News Channels’ in Stephen Cushion & Justin Lewis (2010) The Rise of 24 Hour News Television, New York: Peter Lang Jack Straw (2010) ‘The public must be kept informed of terror threats’, Guardian.co.uk http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2010/nov/01/jack-straw-public-terror-threat John Ryley (2006) ‘Never been a better time to be in TV news’, The Independent, http://www.independent.co.uk/news/media/never-been-a-better-time-to-be-in-tv-news-414538.html Charlie Tuggle and Suzanne Huffman (2001), ‘Live reporting in televisions news: breaking news or blackholes?’, Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media, 45: 335-344

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