history, theories, performers & genres
popular music:
MAC351
From the module guide:
• This module draws upon student’s skills and knowledge of
popular culture studied at level 1.
• Th...
Weekly sessions
1. Intro/Why study pop
music?
2. Rock’n’roll  counter-
culture
3. Soul music
4. Reggae and afrobeat
5. Pr...
Soundtrack to our lives
Popular culture
1. Well-liked by many
2. The opposite of high culture
3. Mass culture (commercial)
4. Of the people
5. Heg...
I was there in 1974 at the first
Suicide practices in a loft in New
York City.
I was working on the organ sounds
with much...
Why Study Popular Music?
Why Study Popular Music?
• researching facts and existing theories
• using theories to develop tools for analysing
texts a...
Putting the ‘disco’ in discourse
“the charts not only constitute
a practice which assumes that
commercial success = cultural
success, but they define
popul...
• ‘music’ Phil Hilfiker
• ‘Music in my ears’ Rob Ellis
• ‘ I’m only popular on the internet’ duncan c
• ‘Cultural theory a...
Mac351 module intro - why study popular music?
Mac351 module intro - why study popular music?
Mac351 module intro - why study popular music?
Mac351 module intro - why study popular music?
Mac351 module intro - why study popular music?
Mac351 module intro - why study popular music?
Mac351 module intro - why study popular music?
Mac351 module intro - why study popular music?
Mac351 module intro - why study popular music?
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Mac351 module intro - why study popular music?

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Opening session on the popular music module at the University of Sunderland

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Mac351 module intro - why study popular music?

  1. 1. history, theories, performers & genres popular music: MAC351
  2. 2. From the module guide: • This module draws upon student’s skills and knowledge of popular culture studied at level 1. • Theories of popular culture are further developed and related to the consumption, production and enjoyment of popular music. • These theories are related to socio-political changes in society. • Furthermore specific musical genres and performers are examined with these concepts and theories in mind.
  3. 3. Weekly sessions 1. Intro/Why study pop music? 2. Rock’n’roll  counter- culture 3. Soul music 4. Reggae and afrobeat 5. Prog rock  art rock 6. Blank generation: punk 7. Post-punk 8. Reading week 9. Electric dreams 10. Pop bands 11. Moral panics and rave 12. Film and music
  4. 4. Soundtrack to our lives
  5. 5. Popular culture 1. Well-liked by many 2. The opposite of high culture 3. Mass culture (commercial) 4. Of the people 5. Hegemonic (a site of struggle) 6. Postmodern culture (blurring boundaries between commercial and authentic)
  6. 6. I was there in 1974 at the first Suicide practices in a loft in New York City. I was working on the organ sounds with much patience. I was the first guy playing Daft Punk to the rock kids. I played it at CBGB's. Everybody thought I was crazy. We all know. But I'm losing my edge to better- looking people with better ideas and more talent. And they're actually really, really nice. I heard you have a compilation of every good song ever done by anybody. Every great song by the Beach Boys. All the underground hits. All the Modern Lovers tracks. LCD Soundsystem – I’m Losing My Edge - 2002
  7. 7. Why Study Popular Music?
  8. 8. Why Study Popular Music? • researching facts and existing theories • using theories to develop tools for analysing texts and cultural practices • apply the theories to understand the facts and using the facts to test the theories • developing ideas/theories of your own
  9. 9. Putting the ‘disco’ in discourse
  10. 10. “the charts not only constitute a practice which assumes that commercial success = cultural success, but they define popular music as being music that is commercially successful. Equally the style of the chart shows defines popular music as new and exciting” (2013: xiii)
  11. 11. • ‘music’ Phil Hilfiker • ‘Music in my ears’ Rob Ellis • ‘ I’m only popular on the internet’ duncan c • ‘Cultural theory and popular culture’ Rob Jewitt • ‘Music’ Sameer Vasta • ‘Disco Ball’ Rosie Rogers • ‘creative commons -Franz Patzig-’ A. Diez Herrero 20

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