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Mac351 from dub to disco electronic music production and creativity

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Lectures slides:
YouTube playlist: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLRCHqijqFjGujfLPQ9kyJE2gKmT3fUG61
Spotify playlist: http://open.spotify.com/user/robbo1337/playlist/5LIQQgziKdmD76ESFqk7fB

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Mac351 from dub to disco electronic music production and creativity

  1. 1. #mac351   robert.jewi>@sunderland.ac.uk   From  dub  to  disco:     Electronic  music  produc3on  and  crea3vity  
  2. 2. Overview   •  Technology   •  Technique   •  Talent  
  3. 3. Useful  sources  
  4. 4. Wri>en  &  designed  by  Evan  Linardi  
  5. 5. “The  ability  to  remix  media,  hack  products,   or  otherwise  tamper  with  consumer   culture  is  their  birthright,  and  they  won't   let  outmoded  intellectual  property  laws   stand  in  their  way”   -­‐  Tapsco>  &  Williams,  2008:  52    
  6. 6. Fairlight  CMI  (1979)  
  7. 7. ABC-­‐TV  -­‐    1980  
  8. 8. Kate  Bush  –  ‘Babooshka’  –  Never  For  Ever  (1980)  
  9. 9. Afrika  Bambaataa  &  Soul  Sonic  Force  –  ‘Planet  Rock’  (1982)  
  10. 10. Kylie  Minogue  –  ‘Sweet  Music’    -­‐  Body  Language  (2004)  
  11. 11. ‘In  1979,  the  use  of  Page  C  and  Music  Composi3on  Language  (MCL)  meant   that  not  only  was  the  Fairlight  a  synthesizer  and  sampler,  it  also   incorporated  musical  composi3on  abili3es.  By  1982,  a  real-­‐3me   programmable  sequencer  was  added.  In  1983,  the  Musical  Instrument   Digital  Interface  (MIDI)  and  Society  for  Mo3on  Picture  and  TV  Engineers   3me  code  (SMPTE)  were  supported’   -­‐  Brabazon,  2012:  101-­‐2  
  12. 12. Akai  S-­‐series   S612  pictured  
  13. 13. Deadmau5  on  DJing   “It  takes  two  days  to  learn,  as  long  as  you  can  count  to  four”   “People  are  […]  smartening  up  about  who  does  what  –  but   there’s  s3ll  bu>on-­‐pushers  gemng  paid  half  a  million.”   -­‐  Rolling  Stone,  2012  
  14. 14. 2  ar3cles  on  Sunspace  
  15. 15. Part  1:  the  dub  
  16. 16. ‘All  any  prime  minister  had  to  do  to   gauge  the  winds  was  to  listen  closely   to  the  week’s  45  rpm  single  releases;   they  were  like  poli3cal  polls  set  to   melody  and  riddim’     -­‐  Jeff  Chang,  2005:  31     Arthur  ‘Duke’ Reid:   “King  of  Sound  &  Blues”   1956,  1957  and  1958     32  
  17. 17. 1962  –  Jamaican  independence   1964  –  Reid  built  recording  studio   1967  –  The  Paragons   Rudolph  ‘Ruddy’  Redwood   &  Byron  Smith      
  18. 18. Part  2:  the  ‘mix’   Nicky  Siano  
  19. 19. Part  3:  the  ‘edit’   1972  –  Botel  club,  Fire  Island,  New  York  
  20. 20.   Law  of  the  Land  starts  with  clapping  and  [Gibbons]  used  to  extend  that  sec3on  in  real  3me  but   there  were  a  few  fuck-­‐ups,  so  I  said,  ‘Why  don’t  we  record  the  song  over  and  over  again,  just  the   beginning  of  it,  and  then  splice  the  magne3c  tape  together?’...  Then  we  pressed  it  to  acetate.     -­‐  Lawrence,  2008:  288  
  21. 21. Part  4:  the  ‘break’   1967  –  Clive  Campbell  (AKA  DJ  Kool  Herc)  arrives  in  the  Bronx  from  Jamaica  
  22. 22. “We  might  an3cipate  a  new  music   based  on  reworking  MP3  recordings   pulled  from  the  Internet  .  .  .  .  In  this   respect,  the  Internet  is  more  than   just  a  means  of  distribu3on,  it   becomes  a  raison  d’être  for  a  culture   based  on  audio  data”   –   Riddell,  2001,  p.341  cited  in   Shiga,  2007:  94  
  23. 23. 39  
  24. 24. 40  
  25. 25. The  Prodigy  –  ‘Smack  My  Bitch  Up’  –  The  Fat  Of  The  Land  (1997)    
  26. 26. "In  the  old  days,  samples  were   $2,500  or  $1,500.  …  I  paid  $2,000   for  a  Gladys  Knight  sample  for  'Can   It  Be  All  So  Simple'  off  Enter  the   Wu-­‐Tang  (36  Chambers).  That  was   a  big  intro,  and  the  hook  was   repe33ous.  Something  like  that   nowadays  would  cost  $10,000."  
  27. 27. •  “mass  culture  provides  the   building  blocks  for  the  stuff   we  create”   –  Lessig  in  Lasica,  2005  
  28. 28. Industry  response     •  •  •  •  lobbying  for  legisla3ve  changes   court  ac3ons   educa3on  and  propaganda  campaigns   technological  means   •  For  more  info  see  Allen  (2008)  and  Lessig   (2004,  2008)  
  29. 29. Expansion  of  U.S.  copyright  law  (assuming  authors  create  their  works  35   years  prior  to  their  death)  
  30. 30. Piracy  used  to  be  about  folks  who   made  and  sold  large  numbers  of   counterfeit  copies.  Today,  the  term   “piracy”  seems  to  describe  any   unlicensed  ac0vity,  especially  if   the  person  engaging  in  it  is  a  male   teenager.  The  content  industry   calls  some  things  that  are   unques3onably  legal  “piracy”’.   -­‐  Litman,  2000:  7-­‐8    
  31. 31. 53  
  32. 32. h>p://remix.nin.com/  
  33. 33. h>p://www.djsasha.com/mailer/    
  34. 34. Copyright/copywrong?   •  Technological  shiys   •  Cultural  shiys   •  Legal  shiys   •  DMCA   •  Fair  use/dealing   •  Sonny  Bono  Copyright  Term  Extension  Act  
  35. 35. If you were sued every time you accidentally violated copyright law in a single day how much would you owe?  
  36. 36. Conclusion   •  Less  than  2%  of  works  have  any  con3nuing  commercial   value  (Lessig,  2004)   •  CTEA  =  Mickey  Mouse  act?   •  ‘Rent-­‐seeking’?   •  S3fling  crea3vity?  
  37. 37.   •  •  ‘Sound  desk’    -­‐  Rob  Jewi>   ‘The  Beatles  Part  2  8-­‐track’  -­‐  Paul  Riismandel   •  ‘mixtape  from  a  friend  in  college’  –  jessamyn  west   •  •  •  •  •  ‘BASF  DAT  Digital  Audio  Tape’  –  windthoek   ‘IMGP6827_minidisc’  –  Rae  Allen   ‘Moog  Li>le  Pha>y  Tribute  Edi3on’  –  Leo  Jun   ‘Radium  49  M-­‐Audio  Keyboard  –  5’  –  Dave  Sag   ‘roland  tb-­‐303  bass  line’  –  dr.  mo>e   ‘Sample  this’  –  John  Athayde   •  •  ‘Analog  music  playing  device’  –  Robert  Frieberger   ‘laws  for  atoms’  –  Will  Lion   •  60  

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