Curriculum development in special education

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Curriculum development in special education

  1. 1. Curriculum Development andInstruction in Special Education SpEd 114
  2. 2. What is a Curriculum?• A course of study• Course content, information that students are to learn• Planned learning experience• Intended learning outcomes• All the experiences that students have while at school – None is “right”, how we define reflects our purposes and the educational setting w/n w/c we work
  3. 3. Relationship between Curriculum and Instruction• Curriculum is conceived • Instruction as the as the “what” “how”• As program, plan, • As methods, teaching content and learning act, implementation, experience and presentation• Programmatic • Methodological Both are subsystems of a larger system called education
  4. 4. What are the bases of Curriculum?• Social forces as factors that affects goals, conception of culture, diversity, changes and future planning• Theories of Human Development (age-related and individual differences)• Nature of Learning & Learning Style• Technology
  5. 5. Curriculum Criteria• Goals and purposes• Diversity among learners• Continuity• Balance• Flexibility• Self-understanding• Relevance to learners• Problem solving
  6. 6. History of CurriculumThree focus points for Curriculum Decisions
  7. 7. History of Curriculum1. The Nature of Subject Matter Content of the curriculum, and what subject matter to include in the curriculum. The subject matter of history should be based on events that actually happened in the past.2. The Nature of the Society If the curriculum is to have utilitarian values, then it must lead the student not only to knowledge of the external world for its own sake, but also to knowledge that can be applied in the world.
  8. 8. History of Curriculum1. The Nature of the Individuals The third basic focal point around which decisions about curricula can be made is the nature of the individual. The curriculum is also a set of suggestions to the teacher about how to take advantage of the present opportunities worthwhile, growth for each student in the long run. The History of Curricula of American school during the 20th century is, therefore, a history of these three focal points for deciding on content ad making other curriculum decisions.
  9. 9. • What can you say about the history of curriculum development? (Sharing)
  10. 10. What are the Foundations of CD• The following four educational philosophies relate to curriculum: 1. Perennialism. The focus in the curriculum is classical subjects, literary analysis and considers curriculum as constant. 2. Essentialism. The essential skills of the 3 Rs and essential subjects of English, Science, History, Math and Foreign Language is the focus of the curriculum.
  11. 11. What are the Foundations of CD• 3. Progressivism. The curriculum is focused on students interest, human problems and affairs. The subjects are interdisciplinary, integrative and interactive. 4. Reconstructionism. The focus of the curriculum is on present and future trends and issues of national and international interests.
  12. 12. (Activity: Compare the four Philosophies ofEducation based on the aim of education, roleof education and curriculum trends. How doesa strong belief or philosophy influencecurriculum
  13. 13. Historical Foundations of Curriculum• Curriculum is not an old field. Majority of scholars would place its beginning in 1918 with the publication of Franklin Bobbits book."The Curriculum" Philippine education came about from various foreign influences. This can be traced back to the glorious history. Of all foreign educational systems, the American educational system has the greatest influence on our educational system.
  14. 14. The following six curriculum theoristscontributed their views on curriculum:1. Franklin Bobbit (1876-1956)- presented curriculum as a science that emphasizes on students need. 2. Werret Charters (1875-1952) - considered curriculum also as a science which is based on students need, and the teachers plan the activities. 3. William Kilpatrick (1871-1965) - viewed curriculum as purposeful activities which are child-centered.
  15. 15. • 4. Harold Rugg (1886-1960) - emphasized social studies in the curriculum and the teacher plans the lesson in advance. 5. Hollis Caswell (1901-1989) - sees curriculum as organized around social functions of themes, organized knowledge and earners interests. 6. Ralph Tyler (1902-1994) - believes that curriculum is a science and an extension of schools philosophy. based on students need and interests. The historical development shows the different changes in the purposes, principles and content of the curriculum. (Question: What are the implications of ever-changing curriculum to teachers?)
  16. 16. Psychological Foundation• Behaviorists Psychology• - consider that learning should be organized in order that students can experience success in the process of mastering the subject matter, and thus, method of teaching should be introduced in a step by step manner with proper sequencing of task. (Activity: Discuss the contributions of Edward L. Thorndike, Ivan Pavlov and Robert Gagne to the present views on curriculum)
  17. 17. 2. Cognitive Psychology - focus their attention on how individuals process information and how the monitor and manage thinking. For the cognitive theorists, learning constitutes a logical method for organizing and interpreting learning. Learning is rooted in the tradition of subject matter where teachers use a lot of problem and thinking skills in teaching learning. These are exemplified by practices like reflective thinking, creative thinking, intuitive thinking, discovery learning, etc. (Activity: Discuss the contributions of Jean Piaget, Lev Vygotsky, Howard Gardner, Felder and Silverman and Daniel Goleman to curriculum development.
  18. 18. • 3. Humanistic Psychology - concerned with how learners can develop their human potential. Based on Gestalt psychology where learning can be explained in terms of the wholeness of the problem and where the environment is changing and the learner is continuously reorganizing his/her perceptions. Curriculum is concerned with the process not the products, personal needs not subject matter; psychological meaning and environmental situations. (Activity: Give the contributions of Abraham Maslow and Carl Rogers to the present field of curriculum development. 4. Social Foundations of Education. Schools exists within the social context.Societal culture affects and shapes schools and their curricula. The relationship of curriculum and society is mutual and encompassing. Hence, to be relevant, the curricula should reflect and preserve the culture of society and its aspirations. At the same time, society should also imbibe the changes brought about by the formal institutions called schools. (Question: A school has been using the same old curriculum it has had for the past ten years. Do you think this is a good practice? Why? Why not?)
  19. 19. 4. Social Foundations of Education. Schools exists within the social context. Societal culture affects and shapes schools and their curricula. The relationship of curriculum and society is mutual and encompassing. Hence, to be relevant, the curricula should reflect and preserve the culture of society and its aspirations. At the same time, society should also imbibe the changes brought about by the formal institutions called schools. (Question: A school has been using the same old curriculum it has had for the past ten years. Do you think this is a good practice? Why? Why not?)

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