Wilderness in Art and Literature Becky Miller
Early 18 th  Century Art <ul><li>During the period roughly around 1826 when Cooper wrote the  Last of the Mohicans  Thomas...
Nature in conflict with civilization <ul><li>Andrew Melrose, &quot;Westward the Star of Empire Takes Its Way&quot; 1867 fr...
Roughing It <ul><li>The cover art from Mark Twain’s  Roughing It  shows the rough and tumble, masculine notion of the west...
Twain’s work and Wilderness <ul><li>This illustration from  The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn  shows Huck and Jim on the ...
Roosevelt and the West <ul><li>An avid outdoors man himself, Teddy Roosevelt was a passionate supporter of wilderness cons...
The Disappearing Frontier <ul><li>This poster depicting  the completion of the trans-continental railroad in 1869 again qu...
Progress and the West <ul><li>This famous work is rife with nationalism as it represents the United States' beauty and var...
The Western Wind River Range as seen during the 2006 summer during my wilderness trip.  In an exerpt from my expedition jo...
 
 
 
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Wilderness pictures

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Wilderness pictures

  1. 1. Wilderness in Art and Literature Becky Miller
  2. 2. Early 18 th Century Art <ul><li>During the period roughly around 1826 when Cooper wrote the Last of the Mohicans Thomas Cole was prominent as a painter of romantic American landscapes. </li></ul><ul><li>Thomas Cole’s 1836 painting, The Oxbow , features at right depicts the Connecticut river near Northampton and makes use of the stylistic techniques of the American romantic school, most notably an expansive and whimsical skyline. </li></ul><ul><li>This painting is typical of the idealization of nature and wilderness as represented in the Leatherstocking Tales. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Nature in conflict with civilization <ul><li>Andrew Melrose, &quot;Westward the Star of Empire Takes Its Way&quot; 1867 from the Personal Collection of E. William Judson depicts the growing tension between wilderness and civilization through the newly constructed log cabin on the left and the standing trees and deer on the right, the jarring presence of the railroad questions the distinction between the two. </li></ul><ul><li>This painting like much of the literature of the period questions the positivism of progress and appeals to a sense of nostalgia for the aboriginal state of American wilderness, which the Romantics would absorb and explore in their art and literature . </li></ul>
  4. 4. Roughing It <ul><li>The cover art from Mark Twain’s Roughing It shows the rough and tumble, masculine notion of the west as well as a beautiful and open skyline of a beautiful wilderness. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Twain’s work and Wilderness <ul><li>This illustration from The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn shows Huck and Jim on the river, very much equals in a situation in which wilderness has removed them from the corruption of society. </li></ul><ul><li>Much of Twain’s work calls to question the morality of civilization and comments on the corruption of eastern society, these image are consistent with his view. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Roosevelt and the West <ul><li>An avid outdoors man himself, Teddy Roosevelt was a passionate supporter of wilderness conservation and believed in the nation’s wilderness as a key feature of national identity </li></ul><ul><li>This photo shows the Roosevelt and John Muir on the top of Glacier Peak in the Yosemite Valley. </li></ul><ul><li>This photo is one of many examples of Teddy Roosevelt exploring the wilderness himself and personally testing himself against nature. </li></ul>
  7. 7. The Disappearing Frontier <ul><li>This poster depicting the completion of the trans-continental railroad in 1869 again questions if the expansion of civilization and progress is positive. The poster while showing idealized technology and progress shows a retreating and shrinking wilderness. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Progress and the West <ul><li>This famous work is rife with nationalism as it represents the United States' beauty and variety growing in manifest destiny, from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean, illustrating the grand drama of Progress in the civilization, settlement and history of this country. </li></ul><ul><li>With the idealized progress the railway passes through the frontier settlers' rude cabins toward the Western Ocean. Next to these are the transportation wagons, overland stage, hunters, gold-seekers, pony-express riders, and &quot;noble red man.&quot; Fleeing from &quot;Progress,&quot; and towards the western mountains visible on the left of the picture beyond the snow-capped summits of the Sierra Nevadas, are the Indians, buffaloes, wild horses, bears, and other game, moving westward--ever westward. </li></ul>
  9. 9. The Western Wind River Range as seen during the 2006 summer during my wilderness trip. In an exerpt from my expedition journal I wrote, “This place so far removed from anything I have know has truly shown me who I am and what I am capable of “

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