Chapter NineProducer Theory: Costs
Types of Firms           Learning Objective• What types of companies exist?
Types of Firms• Proprietorship - a firm owned by a single individual or perhaps by  a family    – The family farm, and man...
Production Functions          Learning Objectives• How is the output of companies modeled?• Are there any convenient funct...
The Production Function• Is the mapping from inputs to an output or outputs?• Many firms produce several outputs.• We can ...
The Cobb-Douglas production function
Figure 9.1. Cobb-Douglas isoquants
Figure 9.2. The production function Isoquants provide a natural way of looking at production functions and are a bit more ...
Figure 9.3. Fixed-proportions and             perfect substitutesfixed-proportions production function is a production fun...
Fixed Production Function• Perfect substitutes are two goods that can be substituted  for each other at a constant rate wh...
Profit Maximization           Learning Objective• If firms maximize profits, how will they  behave?
First-order condition• Consider the case of a fixed level of K. The  entrepreneur chooses L to maximize  profit. The value...
Figure 9.4. Profit-maximizing labor               input                  • A second characteristic of a                   ...
The Second-Order Condition• A mathematical condition for  maximization stating that the second  derivative is nonpositive.
The Shadow Value           Learning Objective• If a firm faces constraints on its behavior,  how can we measure the costs ...
Shadow Value• When capital K can’t be adjusted in the short  run, it creates a constraint, on the profit  available, to th...
Shadow Value• Every constraint has a shadow value.• The term refers to the value of relaxing  the constraint.• The shadow ...
Input Demand          Learning Objectives• How much will firms buy?• How do they respond to input price  changes?
Adjust Capital and Labor to Maximize                Profit• The approach to maximizing profit over  two c separately with ...
Figure 9.5. Tangency and Isoquants                  • Profit is revenue minus costs,                    and the revenue is...
Marginal Rate of Technical Substitution• Cost minimization requires a tangency between the  isoquant and the isocost has a...
Myriad Costs           Learning Objective• What are the different ways of measuring  costs, and how are they related to th...
Short-run Total Cost• SRTC of producing q,—that is, the total cost of output with only  short-term factors varying—given t...
The Short-run Marginal Cost• Given K, is the derivative of short-run  total cost with respect to output, q.• To establish ...
Short Run Costs• The short-run average variable cost is the  average cost ignoring the investment in capital  equipment.• ...
Long Run Costs• Long-run total cost is the total cost of  output with all factors varying.• Long-run average variable cost...
Chapter TenProducer Theory: Dynamics
Reactions of Competitive Firms          Learning Objective• How does a competitive firm respond to  price changes?
How does a Competitive Firm Respond          to Price Changes• When the price of the output is p, the firm  earns profits ...
Figure 10.1. Short-run supply               •   The thick line represents the choice of                   the firm as a fu...
Figure 10.2. Average and marginal               costs                 •   There is a short-run average cost,              ...
Figure 10.3. Increased plant size                 • The quantity produced is                   larger than the quantity th...
Economies of Scale and Scope         Learning Objectives• When firms get bigger, when do average  costs rise or fall?• How...
Economy of Scale• A situation that exists when larger scale lowers  average cost.  – that larger scale lowers cost  – It a...
Economy of Scope• A situation that exists when producing more related  goods lowers average cost.• An economy of scope is ...
External Economy of Scale• An economy of scale that operates at the  industry level, not the individual firm level.• Also ...
• When there is an economy of scale, the sum of  the values of the marginal product exceeds the  total output.  – Conseque...
Dynamics With Constant Costs        Learning Objective• How do changes in demand or cost affect  the short- and long-run p...
Figure 10.4. Long-run equilibrium                 • There are three curves, First, there                   is demand, take...
Figure 10.5. A shift in demand                •   The industry is in equilibrium, with                    price equal to P...
Figure 10.5. A shift in demand                • The initial effect of the                  increased demand is that       ...
Figure 10.6. Return to long-run         equilibrium                • At the new, short-run                  equilibrium, p...
Figure 10.7. A decrease in demand                 • At the long-run                   equilibrium where LRS               ...
Figure 10.9. A decrease in supply                 • An increase in the price of an                   input into production...
General Long-run Dynamics          Learning Objective• If long-run costs aren’t constant, how do  changes in demand or cos...
Figure 10.10. Equilibrium with   external scale economy               •  This reflects a long-run economy                 ...
Figure 10.11. Decrease in demand                 • The short-run demand tends to                   shift down over time, b...
Figure 10.12. Long-run after a decrease              in demand                    • In this case, the long-run            ...
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Lecture 4

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Lecture 4

  1. 1. Chapter NineProducer Theory: Costs
  2. 2. Types of Firms Learning Objective• What types of companies exist?
  3. 3. Types of Firms• Proprietorship - a firm owned by a single individual or perhaps by a family – The family farm, and many “mom and pop” restaurants and convenience stores are operated proprietorships. – Debts accrued by the proprietorship are the personal responsibility of the proprietor.• Partnerships are firms owned by several individuals who share profits as well as liabilities.• A Corporation is treated legally as a single entity owned by shareholders.• The Nonprofit firm is prohibited from distributing a profit to its owners. – They enjoy tax-free status. – Religious organizations, academic associations, environmental groups, most zoos, industry associations, lobbying groups, many hospitals, credit unions (a type of bank), labor unions, private universities, and charities are all organized as nonprofit corporations.
  4. 4. Production Functions Learning Objectives• How is the output of companies modeled?• Are there any convenient functional forms?
  5. 5. The Production Function• Is the mapping from inputs to an output or outputs?• Many firms produce several outputs.• We can view a firm that is producing multiple outputs as employing distinct production processes.• The firm that produces only 1 output can be described as buying an amount x1 of the first input, x2 of the second input, and so on. – The last input is xn• The production function that describes this process is given by y = f(x1, x2, … , xn).
  6. 6. The Cobb-Douglas production function
  7. 7. Figure 9.1. Cobb-Douglas isoquants
  8. 8. Figure 9.2. The production function Isoquants provide a natural way of looking at production functions and are a bit more useful to examine than 3-D plots
  9. 9. Figure 9.3. Fixed-proportions and perfect substitutesfixed-proportions production function is a production function that requires inputsbe used in fixed proportions to produce output.
  10. 10. Fixed Production Function• Perfect substitutes are two goods that can be substituted for each other at a constant rate while maintaining the same output level.• The marginal product of an input is just the derivative of the production function with respect to that input• An important property of marginal product is that it may be affected by the level of other inputs employed.• The value of the marginal product of an input is the marginal product times the price of the output. – If the value of the marginal product of an input exceeds the cost of that input, it is profitable to use more of the input.
  11. 11. Profit Maximization Learning Objective• If firms maximize profits, how will they behave?
  12. 12. First-order condition• Consider the case of a fixed level of K. The entrepreneur chooses L to maximize profit. The value L* of L that maximizes the function π must satisfy:• 0=∂π/∂L=p ∂F/∂L(K,L*)−w.• This expression is known as a first-order condition – a mathematical condition for optimization stating that the first derivative is zero.
  13. 13. Figure 9.4. Profit-maximizing labor input • A second characteristic of a maximum is that the second derivative is negative (or nonpositive). • This arises because, at a maximum, the slope goes from positive (since the function is increasing up to the maximum) to zero (at the maximum) to being negative (because the function is falling as the variable rises past the maximum). • This means that the derivative is falling; or that the second derivative is negative.
  14. 14. The Second-Order Condition• A mathematical condition for maximization stating that the second derivative is nonpositive.
  15. 15. The Shadow Value Learning Objective• If a firm faces constraints on its behavior, how can we measure the costs of these constraints?
  16. 16. Shadow Value• When capital K can’t be adjusted in the short run, it creates a constraint, on the profit available, to the entrepreneur• The desire to change K reduces the profit available to the entrepreneur.• There is no direct value of capital because capital is fixed.• That doesn’t mean we can’t examine its value, however; and the value of capital is called a shadow value – The value associated with a constraint.
  17. 17. Shadow Value• Every constraint has a shadow value.• The term refers to the value of relaxing the constraint.• The shadow value is zero when the constraint doesn’t bind. – for example, the shadow value of capital is zero when it is set at the profit-maximizing level.
  18. 18. Input Demand Learning Objectives• How much will firms buy?• How do they respond to input price changes?
  19. 19. Adjust Capital and Labor to Maximize Profit• The approach to maximizing profit over two c separately with respect to each variable, thereby obtaining the conditions• 0=p∂F/∂L(K**,L**)−w, and• 0=p∂F/∂K(K**,L**)−r.• For both capital and labor, the value of the marginal product is equal to the purchase price of the input.A double star, ** denotes variables in their long-run solution
  20. 20. Figure 9.5. Tangency and Isoquants • Profit is revenue minus costs, and the revenue is price times output. • For the chosen output, then, the entrepreneur earns the revenue associated with the output • Maximizing profits is equivalent to maximizing a constant (revenue) minus costs. • Since maximizing –C is equivalent to minimizing C, the profit-maximizing entrepreneur minimizes costs.
  21. 21. Marginal Rate of Technical Substitution• Cost minimization requires a tangency between the isoquant and the isocost has a useful interpretation.• The slope of the isocost is minus the ratio of input prices.• The slope of the isoquant measures the substitutability of the inputs in producing the output. Economists call this slope the marginal rate of technical substitution – which is the amount of one input needed to make up for a decrease in another input while holding output constant. – Thus, one feature of cost minimization is that the input price ratio equals the marginal rate of technical substitution.
  22. 22. Myriad Costs Learning Objective• What are the different ways of measuring costs, and how are they related to the amount of time the firm has to change its behavior?
  23. 23. Short-run Total Cost• SRTC of producing q,—that is, the total cost of output with only short-term factors varying—given the capital level, is – SRTC(q|K) = minL rK+wL , over all L satisfying F(K, L) ≥ q.• In words, this equation says that the SRTC of the quantity q, given the existing level K, is the minimum cost, where L gets to vary (which is denoted by “min over L”) and where the L considered is large enough to produce q.• The vertical line | is used to indicate a condition or conditional requirement;• |K indicates that K is fixed. The minimum lets L vary but not K.• There is a constraint F(K, L) ≥ q, which indicates that one must be able to produce q with the mix of inputs because we are considering the short-run cost of q.
  24. 24. The Short-run Marginal Cost• Given K, is the derivative of short-run total cost with respect to output, q.• To establish the short-run marginal cost, note that the equation F(K, L) = q implies – ∂F/∂L(K,LS(q,K))dL=dq,
  25. 25. Short Run Costs• The short-run average variable cost is the average cost ignoring the investment in capital equipment.• The short-run average cost also called the short- run average total cost, since it is the average of the total cost per unit of output• Marginal variable cost is the same as the marginal total costs, because the difference between variable cost and total cost is a constant —the cost of zero production, also known as the short-run fixed cost of production.
  26. 26. Long Run Costs• Long-run total cost is the total cost of output with all factors varying.• Long-run average variable cost is the long-run total cost divided by output – it is as known as the long-run average total cost.
  27. 27. Chapter TenProducer Theory: Dynamics
  28. 28. Reactions of Competitive Firms Learning Objective• How does a competitive firm respond to price changes?
  29. 29. How does a Competitive Firm Respond to Price Changes• When the price of the output is p, the firm earns profits π=pq−c(q|K) – Where c(q|K) is the total cost of producing, given that the firm currently has capital K. – Assuming that the firm produces at all, it maximizes profits by choosing the quantity qs satisfying 0=p−c′(qs|K) – The quantity where price equals marginal cost.
  30. 30. Figure 10.1. Short-run supply • The thick line represents the choice of the firm as a function of the price, which is on the vertical axis. • If the price is below the minimum average variable cost (AVC), the firm shuts down. • When price is above the minimum average variable cost, the marginal cost gives the quantity supplied by the firm. • The choice of the firm is composed of two distinct segments: – the marginal cost, where the firm produces the output such that price equals marginal cost; – and shutdown, where the firm makes a higher profit, or loses less money, by producing zero.
  31. 31. Figure 10.2. Average and marginal costs • There is a short-run average cost, short-run average variable cost, and short-run marginal cost. • The long-run average total cost has been added, in such a way that the minimum average total cost occurs at the same point as the minimum short- run average cost, which equals the short-run marginal cost. • This is the lowest long-run average cost, and has the nice property that long-run average cost equals short-run average total cost equals short-run marginal cost. • For a different output by the firm, there would necessarily be a different plant size, and the three-way equality is broken.
  32. 32. Figure 10.3. Increased plant size • The quantity produced is larger than the quantity that minimizes long-run average total cost. • The quantity where short-run average cost equals long-run average cost does not minimize short-run average cost. • A factory designed to minimize the cost of producing a particular quantity won’t necessarily minimize short-run average cost.
  33. 33. Economies of Scale and Scope Learning Objectives• When firms get bigger, when do average costs rise or fall?• How does size relate to profit?
  34. 34. Economy of Scale• A situation that exists when larger scale lowers average cost. – that larger scale lowers cost – It arises when an increase in output reduces average costs.• What makes for an economy of scale? – Larger volumes of productions permit the manufacture of more specialized equipment. – If a firm produces a million identical automotive taillights, the firm can spend $50,000 on an automated plastic stamping machine and only affect my costs by 5 cents each.
  35. 35. Economy of Scope• A situation that exists when producing more related goods lowers average cost.• An economy of scope is a reduction in cost associated with producing several distinct goods.• For example, Boeing, which produces both commercial and military jets, can amortize some of its research and development (R&D) costs over both types of aircraft, thereby reducing the average costs of each.• Scope economies work like scale economies, except that they account for advantages of producing multiple products, where scale economies involve an advantage of multiple units of the same product.
  36. 36. External Economy of Scale• An economy of scale that operates at the industry level, not the individual firm level.• Also known as an industry economy of scale.• For example, there is an economy of scale in the production of disk drives for personal computers. – This means that an increase in the production of PCs will tend to lower the price of disk drives, reducing the cost of PCs, which is a scale economy.
  37. 37. • When there is an economy of scale, the sum of the values of the marginal product exceeds the total output. – Consequently, it is not possible to pay all inputs their marginal product.• When there is a diseconomy of scale, the sum of the values of the marginal product is less than the total output. – Consequently, it is possible to pay all inputs their marginal product and have something left over for the entrepreneur.
  38. 38. Dynamics With Constant Costs Learning Objective• How do changes in demand or cost affect the short- and long-run prices and quantities traded?
  39. 39. Figure 10.4. Long-run equilibrium • There are three curves, First, there is demand, taken to be the “per- period” demand. • Second, there is the short-run supply, which reflects two components—a shutdown point at minimum average variable cost, and quantity such that price equals short-run marginal cost above that level. The short-run supply, however, is the market supply level, which means that it sums up the individual firm effects. • Finally, there is the long-run average total cost at the industry level, thus reflecting any external diseconomy or economy of scale.
  40. 40. Figure 10.5. A shift in demand • The industry is in equilibrium, with price equal to P0, which is the long- run average total cost, and also equates short-run supply and demand. That is, at the price of P0, and industry output of Q0, no firm wishes to shut down, no firm can make positive profits from entering, there is no excess output, and no consumer is rationed. • No market participant has an incentive to change behavior, so the market is in both long-run and short-run equilibrium. • In long-run equilibrium the point where both long-run demand equals long-run supply and short-run demand equals short-run supply., long-run demand equals long-run supply, and short-run demand equals short-run supply, so the market is also in short-run equilibrium
  41. 41. Figure 10.5. A shift in demand • The initial effect of the increased demand is that the price is bid up, because there is excess demand at the old price, P0. • This is reflected by a change in both price and quantity to P1 and Q1, to the intersection of the short-run supply (SRS) and the new demand curve.
  42. 42. Figure 10.6. Return to long-run equilibrium • At the new, short-run equilibrium, price exceeds the long-run supply (LRS) cost. • This higher price attracts new investment in the industry. • It takes some time for this new investment to increase the quantity supplied, but over time the new investment leads to increased output, and a fall in the price.
  43. 43. Figure 10.7. A decrease in demand • At the long-run equilibrium where LRS and D0 and SRS0 all intersect. If demand falls to D1, the price falls to the intersection of the new demand and the old short-run supply, along SRS0. • At that point, exit of firms reduces the short-run supply and the price rises, following along the new demand D1.
  44. 44. Figure 10.9. A decrease in supply • An increase in the price of an input into production. • For example, an increase in the price of crude oil increases the cost of manufacturing gasoline. • This tends to decrease (shift up) both the long-run supply and the short-run supply by the amount of the cost increase. • The increased costs reduce both the short-run supply (prices have to be higher in order to produce the same quantity) and the long-run supply.
  45. 45. General Long-run Dynamics Learning Objective• If long-run costs aren’t constant, how do changes in demand or costs affect short- and long-run prices and quantities traded?
  46. 46. Figure 10.10. Equilibrium with external scale economy • This reflects a long-run economy of scale, because the long-run supply slopes downward, so that larger volumes imply lower cost. • The system is in long-run equilibrium because the short-run supply and demand intersection occurs at the same price and quantity as the long-run supply and demand intersection. • Both short-run supply and short- run demand are less elastic than their long-run counterparts, reflecting greater substitution possibilities in the long run.
  47. 47. Figure 10.11. Decrease in demand • The short-run demand tends to shift down over time, because the price associated with the short- run equilibrium is above the long- run demand price for the short- run equilibrium quantity. • However, the price associated with the short-run equilibrium is below the long-run supply price at that quantity. • The effect is that buyers see the price as too high, and are reducing their demand, while sellers see the price as too low, and so are reducing their supply. • Both short-run supply and short- run demand fall, until a long-run equilibrium is achieved.
  48. 48. Figure 10.12. Long-run after a decrease in demand • In this case, the long-run equilibrium involves higher prices, at the point labeled 2, because of the economy of scale in supply. • This economy of scale means that the reduction in demand causes prices to rise over the long run. • The short-run supply and demand eventually adjust to bring the system into long-run equilibrium

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