Beyond the Whiteboard - Visual Confections That Sell

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Beyond the Whiteboard - Visual Confections That Sell

  1. 1. Hello  and  welcome,  thanks  for  joining  us  for  this  Webinar,  “Visual  Confec<on  that   Sell”.   I’m  Mark  Gibson   I’ve  worked  in  various  B2B  sales  and  marke<ng  leadership  roles  for  more  than  30   years  at  companies  including     For  the  past  two  years,  since  reloca<ng  back  to  USA,  I  have  consulted  with   Whiteboard  Selling,  developing  whiteboard  stories  and  training  thousands  of  people   in  visual  storytelling  technique.     The  idea  for  this  Webinar  came  interest  expressed  in  a  recent  blog  post  I  created.     Actually  the  name  of  this  Webinar  should  read,  “Understanding  how  Visual   confec<ons  can  help  salespeople  communicate”,  but  no-­‐one  would  show  up  with  a   <tle  like  that.     It’s  salespeople  that  sell,  but  visual  confec<ons  can  help  salespeople  own  their  value   proposi<on  and  communicate  it  more  effec<vely.   1  
  2. 2. This  Webinar  will  run  about  16  minutes  or  so.     My  goal  is  for  you  to  understand  what  visual  confec<on  are  and  why  they  are   important  sales  aids  and  finally  how  to  create  them.   Have  you  ever  had  a  Gotomee<ng  or  Webex  with  an  important  prospec<ve  customer   and  you  just  couldn’t  get  both  par<es  to  work?  Well  it  happened  to  me.   I  had  developed  a  visual  confec<on  to  show  how  it  could  help  their  sales  team  tell   their  story.  The  first  20  minutes  were  wasted  as  we  tried  mul<ple  video  conferencing   tools  and  browsers….nothing  worked,  no  visual  communica<on.     With  10  minutes  leX  I  generated  a  .pdf  of  the  image  I  had  created  and  emailed  it  to   the  prospec<ve  client.   With  5  minutes  remaining  before  he  had  to  leave  for  another  mee<ng,  he  received   my  email.   I  talked  him  through  the  visual  confec<on,  validated  his  issues  and  closed  with  next   steps  and  got  another  mee<ng….he  was  interested….this  took  3  minutes.   Now  for  mee<ngs  over  the  Internet,  I  refer  people  to  the  many  high  quality  visual   confec<ons  on  my  Website  and  I  engage  the  buyer  in  discussion.     I  want  to  give  you  the  formal  defini<on  of  a  visual  confec<on  and  show  you  some   examples  of  visual  confec<ons  before  we  get  into  the  why  and  the  what  of  visual     2  
  3. 3. This  image  is  a  visual  confec<on,  its  our  big-­‐idea  story;  it’s  fairly  self  evident  and  it   comes  from  the  back  of  my  business  card.       3  
  4. 4. Edward  TuXe’s  Defini<on:  Visual  Confec<ons  should  be  transparent,  straigh_orward,   obvious,  natural,  ordinary,  conven<onal     This  illustra<on  from  Wikipedia,  is  Charles  Minard’s  map  of  Napoleon's  disastrous   Russian  campaign  and  is  feature  in  Edward  TuXe’s  book,  Beau<ful  Evidence.   Emeritus  Professor  Edward  TuXe  of  Princeton  and  Yale  Universi<es  is  acknowledged   as  world’s  leading  analyst  of  graphic  informa<on.     This  map  is  a  masterpiece  in  sta<s<cal  graphic  representa<on,  and  it’s  also  a  visual   confec<on.   The  numbers  of  men  present  are  represented  by  the  widths  of  the  colored  zones  at  a   rate  of  one  millimeter  for  every  ten-­‐thousand  men;  they  are  further  wrieen  across   the  zones.  The  pale  brown  designates  the  men  who  enter  into  Russia,  the  black  line   those  who  leave  it.    Across  the  boeom  from  right  to  leX  is  another  graph  of  the   temperature  on  their  retreat.     Maps  are  great  visual  confec<ons       4  
  5. 5. Here’s  a  visual  confec<on  form  you  might  be  more  familiar  with,  the  Infographic.   This  one  about  the  ROI  of  inbound  marke<ng  for  lead  genera<on.   5  
  6. 6. Finally,  Websites  are  visual  confec<ons,  or  at  least  they  could  be  if  you  remove  the   meaningless  smiley  faces  and  stock  imagery  and  replace  them  with  images  that  mean   something  to  the  visitors  you  are  interested  in  aerac<ng.   6  
  7. 7. Unfortunately  for  many  salespeople,  this  is  what  they  are  given  to  go  to  market   with….a  PowerPoint  presenta<on  loaded  with  bullets.     Most  salespeople  struggle  to  figure  out  how  to  convert  their  PowerPoint   presenta<ons  into  meaningful  conversa<ons  with  buyers.     Instead  of  conversa<ons,  salespeople  are  leaning  on  PowerPoint  to  tell  their  story   and  nothing  kills  a  conversa<on  faster  than  PowerPoint  bullets     According  to  Forrester,  88%  of  buyers  don’t  want  presenta<ons  from  salespeople,   they  want  conversa<ons  with  salespeople  who  know  what  they  are  talking  about  and   can  bring  insight  to  the  table       Buyers  aren’t  interested  in  your  features  and  benefits  either,  yet  this  is  what  a   majority  of  product  marke<ng  teams  arm  their  salespeople  with  today.     Buyers  are  interested  in  capabili<es  and  the  value  they  can  get  from  using  your   products.       But  it  doesn’t  have  to  be  this  way.   7  
  8. 8. Recent  research  by  Aberdeen  Group  found  that  53%  of  best  in  class  companies   iden<fied  “crea<ng  more  meaningful  conversa<ons”  as  a  top  priority  for  increasing   and  sustaining  revenue  in  an  uncertain  economy.     Visual  confec<ons  can  help  to  capture  your  unique  story  and  to  empower   salespeople  to  tell  it  in  more  meaningful  conversa<ons  with  buyers.     8  
  9. 9. Visual  confec<ons  are  important  selling  tools,  although  up  un<l  recently  have  been   given  scant  aeen<on.     A  big  advantage  in  a  well  thought  out  visual  confec<on  for  sales  is  that  its  scalable.   From  a  7  second  back  of  the  business  card  “I  get  it”  -­‐  to  a  3  minute  tradeshow-­‐floor   conversa<on  in  this  example,  I  can  communicate  a  lot  of  ideas  in  a  short  space  with  a   visual  confec<on,  a  picture  is  worth  a  thousand  words..     Visual  confec<ons  can  convey  meaning  without  a  talk  track.   In  the  process  of  crea<ng  a  visual  confec<ons  for  clients  we  create  a  messaging   architecture  which  can  be  used  to  create  congruence  in  both  marke<ng  and  sales   communica<on.      Do  your  sales  conversa<ons  mirror  the  messages  on  your  Website?   9  
  10. 10. Here  is  an  excerpt  from  a  recent  inbound  marke<ng  proposal  we  sent  to  a  customer,   with  our  partners  Kuno  Crea<ve.       Visual  confec<ons  are  great  in  proposals  and  help  buyers  to  cut  through  the  clueer   and  get  a  mental  picture  of  what  you  mean.     Visual  confec<ons  can  communicate  your  big  ideas  to  large  numbers  of  stakeholders   way  beeer  than  proposals  with  just  words.   Visual  confec<ons  that  are  well  thought  out  can  be  used  an  infinite  number  of  <mes;   within  Websites,  in  proposals,  in  mee<ng  summaries,  customer  communica<on  and   on  paper  whiteboards  or  the  back  of  a  napkin  in  front  of  prospects  to  convey   meaning.   10  
  11. 11. Using  visual  confec<ons  to  train  salespeople  to  tell  their  story  and  communicate   value  is  a  quick  and  powerful  way  of  genng  message  ownership  across  a  sales  force.     Message  ownership  is  power.  When  salespeople  know  their  story,  its  like  body   armour,  they  can  go  into  any  customer  situa<on  with  confidence  and  engage,  like  our   knight  ready  for  baele.     Confidence  opens  the  door  to  beeer  buyer  engagement  and  with  rapport  and  trust   established,  opportunity  for  discovery  improves.     Beeer  discovery  leads  to  beeer  qualifica<on  and  salespeople  who  qualify  effec<vely,   sell  more  than  those  that  don’t.     So  visual  confec<ons  can  help  you  reduce  sales  ramp  <me  through  message   ownership  and  they  can  help  you  grow  sales  faster  than  exis<ng  methods.       11  
  12. 12. Now  lets  examine  how  we  create  visual  confec<ons,       But  before  I  do,  I  want  to  share  a  story  with  you.     I  was  referred  to  a  prospec<ve  client  by  a  business  colleague  and  agreed  to  meet   them  for  lunch.     There  were  several  people  at  the  lunch  table  when  I  arrived.     In  advance  of  the  mee<ng,  I  prepared  a  high  quality  visual  confec<on  to  emphasize   how  I  thought  the  prospect  could  transform  their  sales  and  marke<ng  performance.     On  the  way  to  the  mee<ng,  I  stopped  at  Kinko’s  and  printed  it  on  high  quality  A-­‐3   paper.     During  lunch,  the  conversa<on  came  around  to  sales  and  marke<ng  performance  and   aXer  we  had  established  rapport  and  trust,  I  produced  the  visual  and  talked  them   through  it.     This  served  to  bring  the  economic  buyer  a  long  way  up  the  learning  curve  around   how  they  could  transform  marke<ng  and  sales  performance  and  he  had  an  Ah  Ha   moment.   12  
  13. 13. So  how  to  construct  a  story  using  a  visual  confec<on?     The  star<ng  point  for  my  visual  stories  is  with  the  buyer.     Start  by  asking  who  the  audience  is  for  your  story.   •  What  are  their  issues,  what’s  happening  in  their  industry,  with  compe<<on,  in   their  company,  anything  you  can  find  out  about  the  audience  that  could  be   relevant  and  important  to  the  buyer.   •  Figure  out  why  its  important  and  what  is  important  and  their  priori<es.   •  Understand  what  alterna<ves  exist  –  what  if  they  do  nothing?  How  will  that   impact  them?  Remember  doing  nothing  is  where  up  to  35%  of  forecast  deals  end   up  today,  no  decision.   •  How  can  you  help,  specifically  –  how  can  they  use  your  stuff.   •  Why  should  they  care?   •  And  finally  why  should  they  buy  from  you.     If  you  brainstorm  all  of  these  ques<ons  out,  you  will  have  the  basis  for  a  story.     But  before  you  get  to  tell  your  visual  story,  you  have  to  engage  the  buyer.   13  
  14. 14. As  men<oned,  Visual  storytelling  starts  with  the  buyer.     The  goal  is  to  engage  the  buyer  in  conversa<on  around  their  issues  and  have  your   stuff  –  your  capabili<es  and  the  value  that  using  them  creates  in  the  buyers  context  –   unfold  naturally  in  conversa<on.     We  develop  role  based  persona’s  that  examine  what  buyers  are  trying  to  achieve  and   the  internal  and  external    barriers  they  are  facing.   We  need  to  understand  their  constraints  and  the  implica<ons  of  change  in  their   organiza<on  and  the  risks  involved.     We  also  need  to  understand  where  our  buyers  are  spending  <me  online  and  the   industry  issues  they  are  aeuned  to…and  their  ideal  customer.   14  
  15. 15. Next  we  brainstorm  the  Messaging  Architecture.     This  starts  by  developing  an  understanding  of  your  capabili<es  that  are  relevant  to   solving  the  buyer’s  problem.   By  brainstorming  out  all  of  the  relevant  capabili<es,  we  can  sort  them  into  like  groups   and  abstract  the  posi<oning  pillars.  Posi<oning  pillars  help  you  posi<on  your   capabili<es  in  the  market  versus  your  compe<<on.     Once  we  have  grouped  Win  themes  under  the  appropriate  Posi<oning  Pillars,  its  <me   to  abstract  the  Big  idea,  which  is  a  short  meaningful  sentence  containing  your   posi<oning  pillars.     Now  we  are  ready  to  start  to  build  our  visual  confec<on         15  
  16. 16. I  like  to  use  a  blank  A-­‐3  sketchbook  to  capture  ini<al  ideas.     The  process  I  use  is  to  cram  as  much  material  I  can  on  that  sheet,  make  notes,   underline,  sketch  images  that  come  to  mind  and  jot  things  down.     I  tend  to  group  ideas  in  chunks  of  related  context.     I  write  down  all  the  buyer  issues  in  red,  and  use  them  to  convey  the  core  ideas   around  product  usage     What  industry  issues  are  relevant  –  get  the  on  paper     Are  there  any  visual  metaphors  that  come  to  mind  –  I  always  do  an  image  search   around  key  phrases  to  see  if  I  can  adapt  any  ideas.     Crea<ng  Visual  Confec<ons  requires  intellectual  effort  discipline  and   persistence….and  it  takes  mul<ple  itera<ons  to  eliminate  extraneous  ideas  and  dis<l   the  idea  to  its  simplest  form.     When  you  have  captured  enough  ideas,  move  to  your  chosen  graphical  design  tool   and  begin  to  create  your  visual  confec<on  and  visual  story  flow.  You  might  find  our   Visual  Storytelling  Webinar  of  use  in  developing  your  story   16  
  17. 17. Here  is  a  completed  visual  confec<on  that  I  used  at  a  recent  tradeshow.     It  was  very  effec<ve  and  cost  $60.00  to  buy  the  materials  and  draw  it  out.   I  used  it  for  2  days  and  it  paid  for  itself  handsomely.     Can  you  see  how  visual  confec<ons  can  be  used  to  capture  the  buyers  issues  and   enable  salespeople  to  have  more  useful  sales  conversa<ons.     Can  you  see  how  the  messaging  capture  and  alignment  process  can  help  both  sales   and  marke<ng  tell  the  same  story?     And  can  you  see  how  message  ownership  is  the  big  payoff  for  salespeople?       17  
  18. 18. Lastly  aXer  you  have  created  your  final  visual  confec<on,  it’s  <me  to  train  the  sales   team.     In  the  words  of  John  Medina  in  Brain  Rules,  You  need  to  prac<ce  to  remember  and   remember  to  prac<ce.       Itera<ve  role-­‐playing  is  the  way  to  go,  using  all  of  the  senses,  talking,  seeing,  hearing,   doing,  interac<ng  for  maximum  impact  on  memory  reten<on.   The  principle  is  Supra  addi<ve  integra<on  applies  here,  -­‐  that  is,  the  impact  of  mul<-­‐ sensory  learning  on  the  whole  learning  experience  is  greater  than  the  sum  of  the   individual  parts.     AXer  the  storytelling  workshop,  salespeople  need  to  remember  to  prac<ce  ….and   sales  managers  have  a  role  here  to  mentor  and  develop  storytelling  skills  in  the  field.     Deliberate  prac<ce  is  uncomfortable,  but  worth  the  effort.     Most  salespeople  take  six  months  to  a  year  to  master  their  story;  what  would  it  do   for  your  business  if  your  sales  team  could  master  it  in  two  weeks?     We  wish  you  well  in  crea<ng  visual  confec<ons  and  highly  recommend  the  Edward   TuXe  Workshop  and  the  four  books  in  the  Visual  Explana<ons  series.   18  
  19. 19. Finally  our  visual  storytelling  Webinar  concludes  with  a  call  to  ac<on.     I  hope  you  found  it  useful  and  learned  something  useful  about  visual  confec<ons     We  can  help  you  translate  your  PowerPoint  into  a  simple,  yet  powerful  and   compelling  visual  story  and  help  everyone  on  your  team  master  it.     Please  give  us  a  call  or  click  on  the  URL  and  complete  the  feedback  form.             19  

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