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Experiential Education- A Learning JourneyRob Macpherson, Network Leader, Tourism, Leisure & SportRhiannon Tinsley, Assist...
LocationVineyardHaven
The Institute
“Reflective Practice inExperiential Education”With Joe RaelinCenter for Work and LearningNortheastern UniversityJune 27, 2...
Our Colleagues
Our MentorDr. Paul J. StonelyChief Executive OfficerWorld Association for Co-operativeEducationOur objective for the end o...
Process♦ Goals♦ Needs♦ Objectives♦ Methods♦ EvaluationPLANNING GNOME
Gnome Planning♦ G- oals “Big picture”♦ N- eeds 3 prong♦ O-bjectives Action Language♦ M-ethods The nitty-gritty♦ E-valuatio...
Who benefits?PROGRAMMEEvaluation surveysSmile sheetsInterviewsFocus groupsLEARNINGStudent case studiesVideo-taped lessonsO...
ExperientialEducationJobShadowingSimulationsStudyAbroadWorkPlacementSummerSchoolsInternshipFieldTripsResearchProjectsVolun...
ObjectiveCan thesebecombined?ExperienceExperienceClassroomClassroomExperienceExperienceClassroomClassroomIntegrating Learn...
ObjectiveExplicitKnowledgeRetrievable Tacit KnowledgeNon-retrievable Tacit Knowledge
Start of the Week?
End of the Week?
End of the Week
So why do it?Experiential learning is the processwhereby knowledge is createdthrough the transformation ofexperience.Exper...
So why do it?
Key Principles• Integrated Learning– provide educationally sound learning strategies to maximize community learning opport...
BenefitsStudent Benefits• Increased reported learning and motivation to learn• Deeper understanding of subject matter and ...
BenefitsCommunity Benefits• Additional energy, enthusiasm and resources for addressing issues• Improved relationship with ...
BeneficiariesLearning FocusPrimary Intended BeneficiaryRecipientLearnerField-tripsService-LearningCommunityEngagementVolun...
ProcessExperiential Education is an academically rigorous educationalactivity in which students:1) participate in organize...
ProcessThe theory can be expanded to reflect Kolb’sLearning Circle.
ReflectionAction PlanAction PlanIf it arose again,If it arose again,what would you do?what would you do?DescribeDescribeWh...
Reflective LearnerReflective learners are more likely to be:– more self-aware and self-critical– motivated to improve– mor...
Types of Reflection• Reading: Literature & Written materialcase studies, books, professional journals, poems• Writing: Wri...
Key Principles• ContinuousReflection should be ongoing, occurring before, during and after studentsexperiences.• Connected...
AssessmentAssessment should be:• on-going• aimed at understanding and improvinglearning• makes expectations explicit and p...
Assessment SpiralSET LEARNING OBJECTIVESAssessment SpiralGATHER DATAANALYZE DATADESIGN ASSESSMENTMEASURESSET NEW LEARNING ...
ChallengesTo integrate experiential educationeffectively within a wide range ofprogrammes, there are a numberof challenges...
Challenges• Logistics – student numbers• Logistics – experiential placement site numbers• Negotiations of goals/objectives...
Challenges• Finding appropriate placements for the course• Impact on student funding of placement study• Impact on staff i...
Solutions?All of our colleagues at Martha’s Vineyard came frominstitutions with a specific department/unit that looked aft...
NortheasternAt Northeastern, the service-learning unit providestechnical assistance and resources to all academicdepartmen...
UHIBarriers to Implementation• Lack of clarity of purpose• Lack of support for the project– Allies– Foes– Fence sitters• L...
The wayforward…?JobShadowingSimulationsStudyAbroadWorkPlacementSummerSchoolsInternshipFieldTripsResearchProjectsVolunteeri...
ReferencesThanks are due to the following:(some of whose slides have been mercilessly pilfered)• Donna Qualters, Suffolk U...
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UHI Millennium Institute, HoTLS, Experiential Education Presentation, 2008

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PowerPoint presentation to take forward experiential education within UHI (2008)

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UHI Millennium Institute, HoTLS, Experiential Education Presentation, 2008

  1. 1. Experiential Education- A Learning JourneyRob Macpherson, Network Leader, Tourism, Leisure & SportRhiannon Tinsley, Assistant Registrar
  2. 2. LocationVineyardHaven
  3. 3. The Institute
  4. 4. “Reflective Practice inExperiential Education”With Joe RaelinCenter for Work and LearningNortheastern UniversityJune 27, 2008A Formative Exercise in Real-TimeThe 2008 Martha’s Vineyard Summer Institute
  5. 5. Our Colleagues
  6. 6. Our MentorDr. Paul J. StonelyChief Executive OfficerWorld Association for Co-operativeEducationOur objective for the end of the workshop was:“to produce a plan for betterintegration of experientialeducation within UHI”
  7. 7. Process♦ Goals♦ Needs♦ Objectives♦ Methods♦ EvaluationPLANNING GNOME
  8. 8. Gnome Planning♦ G- oals “Big picture”♦ N- eeds 3 prong♦ O-bjectives Action Language♦ M-ethods The nitty-gritty♦ E-valuation Critical and often notpart of the planningprocessProgrammeParticipantsInstitution
  9. 9. Who benefits?PROGRAMMEEvaluation surveysSmile sheetsInterviewsFocus groupsLEARNINGStudent case studiesVideo-taped lessonsObservations/shadowingLinks with industryINSTITUTIONMatch with missionGrades improveStatistics – graduation ratesPost graduation employability
  10. 10. ExperientialEducationJobShadowingSimulationsStudyAbroadWorkPlacementSummerSchoolsInternshipFieldTripsResearchProjectsVolunteeringServiceLearningGuestLecturesClinicalPracticeCo-operativeEducationCapstoneCourseCaseStudiesCommunityEngagement
  11. 11. ObjectiveCan thesebecombined?ExperienceExperienceClassroomClassroomExperienceExperienceClassroomClassroomIntegrating Learning
  12. 12. ObjectiveExplicitKnowledgeRetrievable Tacit KnowledgeNon-retrievable Tacit Knowledge
  13. 13. Start of the Week?
  14. 14. End of the Week?
  15. 15. End of the Week
  16. 16. So why do it?Experiential learning is the processwhereby knowledge is createdthrough the transformation ofexperience.Experiential Learning
  17. 17. So why do it?
  18. 18. Key Principles• Integrated Learning– provide educationally sound learning strategies to maximize community learning opportunities while and realizing course learning objectives– minimize distinction between students’ community learning role and classroom learning role• High Quality Service– do not compromise academic rigor• Collaboration– establish criteria for selection of service placements to match learning objectives• Student Voice– be prepared for variation in, and some loss of control with, student learning outcomes• Civic Engagement– maximize the community orientation and community responsibility components of course– prepare students for learning from community• Reflection– rethink the instructional role of staff• Assessment & Evaluation– academic credit is for learning outcomes, not service
  19. 19. BenefitsStudent Benefits• Increased reported learning and motivation to learn• Deeper understanding of subject matter and complex social issues• Ability to apply material learned in class to “real world” issues• Opportunity to learn from classmates experiences• Gain hands on skills related to academic and professional area ofinterestStaff Benefits• Addition of new areas for research and publication, and increasedopportunities for professional recognition and reward• Improved student discussion and participation• Enriched approach for delivering subject matter• Increased opportunity to engage students of all learning styles• New relationship with students and community members• Improved understanding of how learning occurs• Greater awareness of social issues as they relate to academic areasof interest
  20. 20. BenefitsCommunity Benefits• Additional energy, enthusiasm and resources for addressing issues• Improved relationship with university and access to university resources• Increased awareness of and support for community organizations andissues• Opportunity to impress upon students the importance of participation inservice• Opportunity to recruit and nurture future volunteers, interns, coops, andfull employees or advocatesUniversity Benefits• Increased opportunity to engage students of all learning styles• Opportunity to be a model Service-Learning program for other universities• Improved student retention and school to work transition• Access to community partners as potential co-teachers• Improve awareness of universities commitment to the community
  21. 21. BeneficiariesLearning FocusPrimary Intended BeneficiaryRecipientLearnerField-tripsService-LearningCommunityEngagementVolunteering(Furco & Duffy 2005)Internships
  22. 22. ProcessExperiential Education is an academically rigorous educationalactivity in which students:1) participate in organized service activities/project(s) that meetneeds identified by the community2) reflect on the service activities/project(s) in such a way as to gainfurther understanding of course/programme content, a broaderappreciation of the discipline, and an enhanced sense of civicresponsibility. (Bringle & Hatcher, 1995)
  23. 23. ProcessThe theory can be expanded to reflect Kolb’sLearning Circle.
  24. 24. ReflectionAction PlanAction PlanIf it arose again,If it arose again,what would you do?what would you do?DescribeDescribeWhat happened?What happened?What were you thinking andWhat were you thinking andfeeling?feeling?EvaluateEvaluateWhat was good/badWhat was good/badabout theabout theexperience?experience?AnalysisAnalysisWhat sense can you make of this? WhatWhat sense can you make of this? Whatwere your biases, assumptions?were your biases, assumptions?Are they true?Are they true?AlternativesAlternativesWhat else could have youWhat else could have youdone?done?
  25. 25. Reflective LearnerReflective learners are more likely to be:– more self-aware and self-critical– motivated to improve– more able to carry throughindependent learning(Oxford University, 2005)
  26. 26. Types of Reflection• Reading: Literature & Written materialcase studies, books, professional journals, poems• Writing: Written exercisesblogging, journaling, essays, self-evaluations, creatingportfolios, analysis paper, poems, case studies, song lyrics• Doing: Projects & Activitiesrole playing, video development, musical performance,analyzing/creating budgets, watch & debrief related movie• Telling: Oral exercisesinformal/formal discussions, storytelling, teaching a class,presentations, legislative testimony, debateOpportunities for students to demonstrateknowledge and for you to evaluate what theyhave learned
  27. 27. Key Principles• ContinuousReflection should be ongoing, occurring before, during and after studentsexperiences.• ConnectedReflection provides opportunity to integrate learning from experience withinthe academic content or personal development, including ways in which theexperiences illustrate concepts, theories and trends.• ChallengingReflection both supports and challenges students to engage issues bythinking critically, pushing them to pose stimulating questions and todevelop alternative explanations for their initial perceptions andobservations of their experiences.• ContextualizedReflection relies on the analysis of the context of the issues beingdiscussed and the setting. It occurs in various forms and settings.(Eyler, Giles, & Schmiede, 1996)
  28. 28. AssessmentAssessment should be:• on-going• aimed at understanding and improvinglearning• makes expectations explicit and public• sets appropriate standards for learning quality• systematically gathers, analyzes, andinterprets evidence• uses the results to document/explain/improveperformance• assessment ≠ evaluation(Angelo, 1996)
  29. 29. Assessment SpiralSET LEARNING OBJECTIVESAssessment SpiralGATHER DATAANALYZE DATADESIGN ASSESSMENTMEASURESSET NEW LEARNING OBJECTIVESDESIGN NEW MEASURESGATHER NEW DATADefineOutcomes
  30. 30. ChallengesTo integrate experiential educationeffectively within a wide range ofprogrammes, there are a numberof challenges (or barriers) whichhave to be overcome.
  31. 31. Challenges• Logistics – student numbers• Logistics – experiential placement site numbers• Negotiations of goals/objectives between externalagency and the students• Town/gown barriers• Time commitment of all parties – students, staff andcommunity partners• Ethical challenges• Balancing integration of students’ personal feelingsabout workplace and/or social issues (of which theyoften become aware of during the reflective process)with the academic learning they need to express to beevaluated
  32. 32. Challenges• Finding appropriate placements for the course• Impact on student funding of placement study• Impact on staff in determining more effective tools forassessment and evaluation• Varied levels of commitment among students and/orpartners• Short and long-term effects on the external agency vizfuture relationship; future placement opportunities;future employment opportunities• Communication of challenges in timely manner• Poor implementation of best practice by student, staffand/or partners
  33. 33. Solutions?All of our colleagues at Martha’s Vineyard came frominstitutions with a specific department/unit that looked afterexperiential education and co-ordinated placement study.In the main, these were independent of any particularfaculty and were not large – 2-5 staff.All their institutions saw them as customer facing (be itstudents or external partners) and a significant part of theircommunity engagement activity.Currently, experiential education within UHI is conductedon a programme-by-programme basis. This may provechallenging if experiential learning is to be integrated in ameaningful way post modularisation.
  34. 34. NortheasternAt Northeastern, the service-learning unit providestechnical assistance and resources to all academicdepartments such as:a. identifying appropriate partnersb. acting as initial liaison with partnersc. administration, resources & forms (work permits)d. orientating students and partnerse. providing best practice tools for reflection, evaluationand assessmentf. facilitating validation, assessment & evaluation processg. staff development – funding conferences/workshopsh. staff training and support (teaching assistants)i. providing student support – references, portfolios,documentation, curriculum vitarum, awards, etc.j. accessing grants and other funding for studentsk. developing university-wide tracking/reporting mechanismand interactive web portal to support students/partners
  35. 35. UHIBarriers to Implementation• Lack of clarity of purpose• Lack of support for the project– Allies– Foes– Fence sitters• Lack of resources• Changing Personnel
  36. 36. The wayforward…?JobShadowingSimulationsStudyAbroadWorkPlacementSummerSchoolsInternshipFieldTripsResearchProjectsVolunteeringServiceLearningGuestLecturesClinicalPracticeCo-operativeEducationCapstoneCourseCaseStudiesCommunityEngagement
  37. 37. ReferencesThanks are due to the following:(some of whose slides have been mercilessly pilfered)• Donna Qualters, Suffolk University• Joe Raelin, Northeastern University• Rick Porter, Northeastern University• Kristen Simonelli, Northeastern University• Kate McLaughlin, Northeastern University• Jim Stellar, Northeastern University• Tim Donovan, Northeastern Universityand the colleagues of the other six institutions at MVSI.

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