SharePoint Saturday Chicago Suburbs - June 1st, 2013SPS EVENTSChicago-SuburbsPractical Information ArchitectureRobert Bogu...
SharePoint Saturday Chicago Suburbs2SponsorsPlatinumGoldSilver
Agenda• Orientation / whereare we?• What isinformationarchitecture?• What does goodarchitecture looklike?• What canSharePo...
How do youfeel aboutinformationarchitecture?
History of InformationManagement
You Are Here!Excerpted from Elements of User Experience
Lexicon• The vocabulary ofa particularlanguage, field,social class,person, etc.– Dictionary.com• InformationArchitecture u...
Collaboration• To conspire withthe enemy?• Types– Synchronous / Real-TimePhoneInstant Messaging– Asynchronous / TimeUncoup...
Rubric• “a scoring tool forsubjectiveassessments. It is aset of criteria andstandards linked tolearning objectivesthat is ...
What is an Architect?• Chief Builder(Greek)• Primarilyresponsible forconverting userrequirements into abuilt solution• Chi...
Information Design• “Skill and practiceof preparinginformation so touse it withefficiency andeffectiveness” –Wikipedia.org
What is Information Architecture?• “The process ofcreating astructure and toolsfor informationsuch that it can bestored, r...
Defining Taxonomy• Taxonomy – Thescience ortechnique ofclassification– Dictionary.com• Classification – Asystematicarrange...
Types of taxonomies• Hierarchical– Computer File Folder• Multidimensional /Faceted– E-Commerce Sites– Relational Database–...
Physical vs. Electronic• Physical– Content in one andonly location– Copies are hard tomake– Cross references aredifficult ...
Taxonomy and NavigationTaxonomy• Organization• InformationArchitect Think• Structure andMetadataNavigation• Visualization•...
Folksonomy• Collaborative Tagging• Free Vocabulary• Emergent• Issues– Synonyms – multipletags, same concept– Homonymy – sa...
Example: Dewey Decimal System• Two key taxonomiesfor libraries– Dewey DecimalClassification (DCC)– Library of CongressClas...
Perspective• Realize – it will bewrong• Plan to fix it overtime• “My books arewater; those of thegreat geniuses arewine – ...
Creator vs. Consumer• Creators areinterested in EASEto STORE• Consumers areinterested in EASEto RETREIVE• Departmentaltaxo...
Folders vs. Metadata• SharePoint has theability to transformfolders (location)and metadata backand forth• Use folders fors...
Targeting Information• Why Target?– Information Overload• Targeting Options– In-PartPersonalization– Web Part Targeting– P...
Search vs. Navigation• 50% of usersNavigate, 50% ofusers Search• Users areinterested in theresults – not thepath• Highly r...
Internet vs. Intranet Search• Most of the time …– On Internet you don’tknow the SPECIFICarticle or document youwant … you ...
Problems with Search• Inherent delaybetween contentadded and contentsearchable• Relatively highload – don’t useeverywhere
Business Intelligence• Similar Terminology• Similar Taxonomy– OLAP/Multi-Dimensional= Metadata• Include as a part ofthe ta...
Navigation Types• Global (Top)Navigation• Local (Left)Navigation• Breadcrumbs(BackupNavigation)• Article Links(ContentNavi...
Site Directories• Organization ofSites– GenerallyCollaborative Sites– Disconnected from theprimary intranetnavigation• Lin...
Site Map• Dated Concept– Useful when sites hadless than 100 pages– Most intranets havethousands of pages• Consider Partial...
Page Layout• Wireframes• Avoid carving uppages• Pay attention tothe page fold• Don’t forgetinformationoverload
Organization• Consider how youorganize physicalspace• Consider how youorganize yourdigital space• Expand theseconcepts to ...
Kitchen Organization• Every kitchen isdifferent• Every organizationis different• No kitchenorganization isperfect• Cabinet...
Garage Organization• Horizontal spacesfill first• Small containersfor small items(bolts)• Large containersfor larger items...
My Computer Organization• Local Drives• Network Drives• Desktop (Flatspace)• My Documents• Search
Location Based Metadata• Convert locationinto metadata• SharePointfoundation feature
Content Organizer• Converts metadatato location• SharePoint ServerPublishing feature• Immediate andtimer job based
Terms Sets• Consistent choicedata across sitecollections• Managed Metadataservice• Allows for items tobe renamed andmerged
File Share Replacement• SharePoint isn’tanother dumpingground• Doesn’t addressthe true problemwith file shares –findabilit...
Site Collection Sizing• Need to ensurethat no sitecollection (majorboundary)exceeds 100 GB• Fewer sitecollections =easierm...
Content Types• Packages ofMetadata andProcessinformation• Limited to a sitescope – but can bedeployed orsyndicated
Site Columns• Fields or Metadata• Defined at the sitecollection level• Can be added to alist or a contenttypes
Hierarchical TaxonomicBreakdowns• Power/Authority– President: Vice President• Evolution– Kingdom: Phylum• Whole: Part– Com...
Card Sorting• Put a selection ofitems on cards inlarge type• Hand them tocustomers and askthem to sort them• Name the resu...
Industry Templates• Predefined start• Defines– Key terminology– Important Metadata– Prototypicalbreakdowns
Seven +/- 2• Seven plus orminus two– Two seconds ofauditory• Broad and Shallow– Subset scanning– Cognitive load
Transformation• Clearly know– Current State– Future State• Map current stateaspects to futurestate
Only the metadata you need…• Store only themetadata you needfor retrieval• Ask the user onlyfor the metadatayou can’t infe...
If you’re overwhelmed...1. Define ContentTypes / Metadata /Terms2. Define Structure /Hierarchy3. Define Targeting
Thank YouRobert Bogue(317) 572-5310Shepherd@SharePointShepherd.com
Practical Information Architecture
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Practical Information Architecture

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Here there will be no fancy words (that aren't made fun of) and no complex mathematical models. In this session you'll learn to take the content types, site columns, and navigation options and assemble them into an information architecture that your organization can actually use. Learn how Managed Metadata Services can help you ensure consistency while location-based default metadata can help to drive metadata 'entry'. This session will be information architecture you can do.

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Practical Information Architecture

  1. 1. SharePoint Saturday Chicago Suburbs - June 1st, 2013SPS EVENTSChicago-SuburbsPractical Information ArchitectureRobert Bogue(317) 572-5310; Shepherd@SharePointShepherd.com
  2. 2. SharePoint Saturday Chicago Suburbs2SponsorsPlatinumGoldSilver
  3. 3. Agenda• Orientation / whereare we?• What isinformationarchitecture?• What does goodarchitecture looklike?• What canSharePoint do?• What should I do?
  4. 4. How do youfeel aboutinformationarchitecture?
  5. 5. History of InformationManagement
  6. 6. You Are Here!Excerpted from Elements of User Experience
  7. 7. Lexicon• The vocabulary ofa particularlanguage, field,social class,person, etc.– Dictionary.com• InformationArchitecture useslarge words toconvey simpletopics
  8. 8. Collaboration• To conspire withthe enemy?• Types– Synchronous / Real-TimePhoneInstant Messaging– Asynchronous / TimeUncoupledVoice MailEmail
  9. 9. Rubric• “a scoring tool forsubjectiveassessments. It is aset of criteria andstandards linked tolearning objectivesthat is used toassess a student’sperformance onpapers, projects,essays, and otherassignments”– Wikipedia.org
  10. 10. What is an Architect?• Chief Builder(Greek)• Primarilyresponsible forconverting userrequirements into abuilt solution• Chief Negotiator ofCompromise• Devisor ofMeaningfulBreakdownStructures
  11. 11. Information Design• “Skill and practiceof preparinginformation so touse it withefficiency andeffectiveness” –Wikipedia.org
  12. 12. What is Information Architecture?• “The process ofcreating astructure and toolsfor informationsuch that it can bestored, retrieved,and managedefficiently andeffectively” – RobBogue• Relies uponcompromise
  13. 13. Defining Taxonomy• Taxonomy – Thescience ortechnique ofclassification– Dictionary.com• Classification – Asystematicarrangement intoclasses or groups– Dictionary.com
  14. 14. Types of taxonomies• Hierarchical– Computer File Folder• Multidimensional /Faceted– E-Commerce Sites– Relational Database– OLAP• Network– Wiki– World Wide Web
  15. 15. Physical vs. Electronic• Physical– Content in one andonly location– Copies are hard tomake– Cross references aredifficult to build andmaintain (cardcatalog)– Problem: Getting tothe one copy• Electronic– Content (in manyversions) stored inmore than onelocation– Copies are easy tomake– Cross References aredynamic and easier tocreate– Search can be used toimprove findability– Problem: Maintainingone source of truth
  16. 16. Taxonomy and NavigationTaxonomy• Organization• InformationArchitect Think• Structure andMetadataNavigation• Visualization• User Think• Context andCategory
  17. 17. Folksonomy• Collaborative Tagging• Free Vocabulary• Emergent• Issues– Synonyms – multipletags, same concept– Homonymy – same tag,different meaning– Polysemy – same tag,multiple related meanings– Specificity – level ofdetails• Examples– Delicious– Flicker
  18. 18. Example: Dewey Decimal System• Two key taxonomiesfor libraries– Dewey DecimalClassification (DCC)– Library of CongressClassification (LCC)• ~95% of public andschool libraries usethe DCC system• ~75% of colleges anduniversities use theLCC
  19. 19. Perspective• Realize – it will bewrong• Plan to fix it overtime• “My books arewater; those of thegreat geniuses arewine – everybodydrinks water” –Mark Twain
  20. 20. Creator vs. Consumer• Creators areinterested in EASEto STORE• Consumers areinterested in EASEto RETREIVE• Departmentaltaxonomies focuson EASE to STORE• Functionaltaxonomies focuson EASE toRETREIVE
  21. 21. Folders vs. Metadata• SharePoint has theability to transformfolders (location)and metadata backand forth• Use folders forsecurity andfamiliarity.• Use metadata forflexibility
  22. 22. Targeting Information• Why Target?– Information Overload• Targeting Options– In-PartPersonalization– Web Part Targeting– Personal Pages
  23. 23. Search vs. Navigation• 50% of usersNavigate, 50% ofusers Search• Users areinterested in theresults – not thepath• Highly relevantsearch may befaster thannavigation
  24. 24. Internet vs. Intranet Search• Most of the time …– On Internet you don’tknow the SPECIFICarticle or document youwant … you search bytopic– On the Intranet youalmost always know theSPECIFIC article ordocument you want• Internet has manypeople working onsearch engineoptimization (SEO)and your Intranetdoesn’t
  25. 25. Problems with Search• Inherent delaybetween contentadded and contentsearchable• Relatively highload – don’t useeverywhere
  26. 26. Business Intelligence• Similar Terminology• Similar Taxonomy– OLAP/Multi-Dimensional= Metadata• Include as a part ofthe taxonomy forthe SharePoint site– rather thanmaking businessintelligence it’s ownarea
  27. 27. Navigation Types• Global (Top)Navigation• Local (Left)Navigation• Breadcrumbs(BackupNavigation)• Article Links(ContentNavigation)
  28. 28. Site Directories• Organization ofSites– GenerallyCollaborative Sites– Disconnected from theprimary intranetnavigation• Linking Strategies– Search– Targeted links inpublic spaces
  29. 29. Site Map• Dated Concept– Useful when sites hadless than 100 pages– Most intranets havethousands of pages• Consider Partial SiteMap if you insist– List only key content• Search Replaces– It’s easier for most folksto search– Use best bets to ensureresults
  30. 30. Page Layout• Wireframes• Avoid carving uppages• Pay attention tothe page fold• Don’t forgetinformationoverload
  31. 31. Organization• Consider how youorganize physicalspace• Consider how youorganize yourdigital space• Expand theseconcepts to yourintranet
  32. 32. Kitchen Organization• Every kitchen isdifferent• Every organizationis different• No kitchenorganization isperfect• Cabinets are thecontainers• “Kitchens oftenhave junkdrawers”
  33. 33. Garage Organization• Horizontal spacesfill first• Small containersfor small items(bolts)• Large containersfor larger items(tools)• Racks for largercontainers• Hanging areas forhand tools
  34. 34. My Computer Organization• Local Drives• Network Drives• Desktop (Flatspace)• My Documents• Search
  35. 35. Location Based Metadata• Convert locationinto metadata• SharePointfoundation feature
  36. 36. Content Organizer• Converts metadatato location• SharePoint ServerPublishing feature• Immediate andtimer job based
  37. 37. Terms Sets• Consistent choicedata across sitecollections• Managed Metadataservice• Allows for items tobe renamed andmerged
  38. 38. File Share Replacement• SharePoint isn’tanother dumpingground• Doesn’t addressthe true problemwith file shares –findability• Costs more tooperateSharePoint than afile share
  39. 39. Site Collection Sizing• Need to ensurethat no sitecollection (majorboundary)exceeds 100 GB• Fewer sitecollections =easiermanagement
  40. 40. Content Types• Packages ofMetadata andProcessinformation• Limited to a sitescope – but can bedeployed orsyndicated
  41. 41. Site Columns• Fields or Metadata• Defined at the sitecollection level• Can be added to alist or a contenttypes
  42. 42. Hierarchical TaxonomicBreakdowns• Power/Authority– President: Vice President• Evolution– Kingdom: Phylum• Whole: Part– Computer: Hard drive• Period: Event– 1980s: Parachute Pants• General: Specific– Ocean: Indian• Group: Member– Republicans: George Bush
  43. 43. Card Sorting• Put a selection ofitems on cards inlarge type• Hand them tocustomers and askthem to sort them• Name the resultinggroups
  44. 44. Industry Templates• Predefined start• Defines– Key terminology– Important Metadata– Prototypicalbreakdowns
  45. 45. Seven +/- 2• Seven plus orminus two– Two seconds ofauditory• Broad and Shallow– Subset scanning– Cognitive load
  46. 46. Transformation• Clearly know– Current State– Future State• Map current stateaspects to futurestate
  47. 47. Only the metadata you need…• Store only themetadata you needfor retrieval• Ask the user onlyfor the metadatayou can’t infer• Users will subvertthe system if youask for too much
  48. 48. If you’re overwhelmed...1. Define ContentTypes / Metadata /Terms2. Define Structure /Hierarchy3. Define Targeting
  49. 49. Thank YouRobert Bogue(317) 572-5310Shepherd@SharePointShepherd.com

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