Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Card Sorting
Your Way to
Meaningful
Metadata
Robert Bogue
(317) 572-5310
Rob.Bogue@ThorProjects.com
Objective
• Why card sorting is important
• What it is
• How to do it
Agenda
• The Findability Challenge
• The Great Debates
• Information Architecture
• Card Sorting
The Findability Challenge
Meet Alice
• Just joined the company as a
field service rep
• Mother of three toddlers
• Experienced professional
Suffer with Alice
• Alice needs to know where to
find:
• Employee Handbook
• Vacation Request Form
• Expense Report Form
•...
Expense Report Form
• Who owns it?
• Accounting
• Payroll
• Human Resources
• What are the rules?
• When do I have to turn...
Sales Training
• Learning Management System
• Where is it?
• What does it have (and not have)
in it?
• PowerPoint Template...
The Great Debates
Creator Versus Consumer
• Creators are interested in EASE to
STORE.
• Consumers are interested in EASE to
RETRIEVE.
• Depa...
Departmental Structures
• Most common intranet
organizational structure
• Easy for the CREATOR
• Difficult for the Consumer
Functional
Structures
• My “Organization”
• Benefits
• Payroll
• Health
• Retirement
• Facilities
• Physical Access
• Clea...
Folders Versus Metadata
• SharePoint has the capability
to transform folders (location)
and metadata back and forth.
• Use...
Search vs. Navigation
• 50% of users Navigate, 50% of
users Search
• Users are interested in the
results – not the path
• ...
Words Are Not Meaning
• Staff
• Died
• Organ
• Seal
• Dust
• Weather
• Strike
• Workshop
• Sanction
• Bi-weekly
Pogo-Sticking Problem
• Rapidly clicking on search results
and clicking back to results /
Clicking sub-categories then
bac...
Information Scent
• From 1970s optimal foraging
theory
• Cue to indicate whether the
information sought is in this
directi...
Folksonomy
• Collaborative Tagging
• Free Vocabulary
• Emergent
• Issues
• Synonyms – multiple tags, same concept
• Homony...
First, Taxonomy then
Navigation
• Creating a taxonomy is
understanding the order and
nature of the content
• Navigation is...
Information Architecture
Content Inventory
• Collect classes of documents
• Identify those classes which are
“important”
• Frequently used
• Requir...
Inventory Detail
Source
(File Share)
Folder Folder
File
File
Folder File
Folder
File
File
Source
(SharePoint)
Site Library...
Information Architecture Questions
Goals
What are the
goals of the
organization?
Scope
What is
included and
excluded?
Cont...
Target Usage
Communication
• One-to-Many
• Controlled
• Feeling “in the know”
Collaboration
• Many-to-Many
• Uncontrolled
...
Gather Attributes
Determine Essential
Attributes
Identify Values
Create Ranges /
Groups
Design Navigation and
Search
Reduc...
Types of Metadata
• Intrinsic
• File Size
• Item Type
• Derived
• Created By
• Created Date
• Modified By
• Modified Date
...
Metadata Options and Values
• Gender (Singular, M/F,?)
• Age (Singular, Number)
• Experience (Singular, Choice)
• Software...
Staffing an Information
Architecture Project
• Phases
• Content Inventory
• IA leading BAs
• Card Sorting
• IA leading, 1 ...
Card Sorting
• The most effective exercise for
creating a taxonomy
• Often need to nudge/push out
of current thinking
• Ne...
Card Sorting - Open
• Get multiple groups of 2-5 to
process separately
• Hand them “cards” of categories
of documents
• As...
Taxonomy Validation
• Intuitive – Easy to navigate and
use
• Unambiguous – Doesn’t offer
alternatives
• Hospitable – Can a...
Card Sorting - Closed
• Different people than used for
Open Card Sort
• Hand them the “cards” and the
categories
• Ask the...
Content Inventory
Sample Taxonomy
Timeline
Questions and Answers
Card Sorting Your Way to Meaningful Metadata
Card Sorting Your Way to Meaningful Metadata
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Card Sorting Your Way to Meaningful Metadata

347 views

Published on

Card sorting is one of the most powerful techniques for improving the information architecture and taxonomy that you create. In this session we'll put card sorting in context and show you how to use them to create meaningful metadata.

You can download this presentation now by visiting https://www.thorprojects.com/connect/gifts/presentations/card-sorting-your-way-to-meaningful-metadata.

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Card Sorting Your Way to Meaningful Metadata

  1. 1. Card Sorting Your Way to Meaningful Metadata Robert Bogue (317) 572-5310 Rob.Bogue@ThorProjects.com
  2. 2. Objective • Why card sorting is important • What it is • How to do it
  3. 3. Agenda • The Findability Challenge • The Great Debates • Information Architecture • Card Sorting
  4. 4. The Findability Challenge
  5. 5. Meet Alice • Just joined the company as a field service rep • Mother of three toddlers • Experienced professional
  6. 6. Suffer with Alice • Alice needs to know where to find: • Employee Handbook • Vacation Request Form • Expense Report Form • Sales Training • She wants to find: • How to get connected to the organization • What her benefits are
  7. 7. Expense Report Form • Who owns it? • Accounting • Payroll • Human Resources • What are the rules? • When do I have to turn it in? • What is (and isn’t allowed)?
  8. 8. Sales Training • Learning Management System • Where is it? • What does it have (and not have) in it? • PowerPoint Templates • Where are they? • Are there template decks? • Resources • Where are they?
  9. 9. The Great Debates
  10. 10. Creator Versus Consumer • Creators are interested in EASE to STORE. • Consumers are interested in EASE to RETRIEVE. • Departmental taxonomies focus on EASE to STORE. • Functional taxonomies focus on EASE to RETRIEVE.
  11. 11. Departmental Structures • Most common intranet organizational structure • Easy for the CREATOR • Difficult for the Consumer
  12. 12. Functional Structures • My “Organization” • Benefits • Payroll • Health • Retirement • Facilities • Physical Access • Cleanliness • Technology • PC • Remote Access • At “Organization”
  13. 13. Folders Versus Metadata • SharePoint has the capability to transform folders (location) and metadata back and forth. • Use folders for security and familiarity. • Use metadata for flexibility.
  14. 14. Search vs. Navigation • 50% of users Navigate, 50% of users Search • Users are interested in the results – not the path • Highly relevant search may be faster than navigation
  15. 15. Words Are Not Meaning • Staff • Died • Organ • Seal • Dust • Weather • Strike • Workshop • Sanction • Bi-weekly
  16. 16. Pogo-Sticking Problem • Rapidly clicking on search results and clicking back to results / Clicking sub-categories then back to the higher level • Users aren’t getting what they want • May indicate poor information scent
  17. 17. Information Scent • From 1970s optimal foraging theory • Cue to indicate whether the information sought is in this direction • Ambient / environmental feel
  18. 18. Folksonomy • Collaborative Tagging • Free Vocabulary • Emergent • Issues • Synonyms – multiple tags, same concept • Homonymy – same tag, different meaning • Polysemy – same tag, multiple related meanings • Specificity – level of details • Examples • Delicious • Flicker
  19. 19. First, Taxonomy then Navigation • Creating a taxonomy is understanding the order and nature of the content • Navigation is trying to solve the findability problem • You can not solve a problem you don’t understand
  20. 20. Information Architecture
  21. 21. Content Inventory • Collect classes of documents • Identify those classes which are “important” • Frequently used • Required/Important • Identify metadata
  22. 22. Inventory Detail Source (File Share) Folder Folder File File Folder File Folder File File Source (SharePoint) Site Library Folder File File Folder
  23. 23. Information Architecture Questions Goals What are the goals of the organization? Scope What is included and excluded? Content What information is being managed? Process What is being done with the content? Metadata What are the values and ranges? Visuals
  24. 24. Target Usage Communication • One-to-Many • Controlled • Feeling “in the know” Collaboration • Many-to-Many • Uncontrolled • Working together towards a goal
  25. 25. Gather Attributes Determine Essential Attributes Identify Values Create Ranges / Groups Design Navigation and Search Reduction of Building an IA
  26. 26. Types of Metadata • Intrinsic • File Size • Item Type • Derived • Created By • Created Date • Modified By • Modified Date • Declared • List/Library Fields • Terms • Document Properties
  27. 27. Metadata Options and Values • Gender (Singular, M/F,?) • Age (Singular, Number) • Experience (Singular, Choice) • Software Version (Multiple, Choice) • Role (Multiple, Choice) • Industry (Multiple, Lookup) • Height (Singular, Text? Number?) • Name (Singular, Text) • Organization (Singular, Text/Lookup)
  28. 28. Staffing an Information Architecture Project • Phases • Content Inventory • IA leading BAs • Card Sorting • IA leading, 1 BA supporting • Fine Tuning • IA Performs / Leads • Depends on • Experience • Quality desired
  29. 29. Card Sorting • The most effective exercise for creating a taxonomy • Often need to nudge/push out of current thinking • Need clarity of audience and purpose
  30. 30. Card Sorting - Open • Get multiple groups of 2-5 to process separately • Hand them “cards” of categories of documents • Ask them to create categories to organize “cards”
  31. 31. Taxonomy Validation • Intuitive – Easy to navigate and use • Unambiguous – Doesn’t offer alternatives • Hospitable – Can accommodate all content • Consistent and Predictable – provides context / follows a single model
  32. 32. Card Sorting - Closed • Different people than used for Open Card Sort • Hand them the “cards” and the categories • Ask them to put “cards” into categories • Score • -1 for “cards” they can’t file • -2 for “cards” they put in the wrong spot
  33. 33. Content Inventory
  34. 34. Sample Taxonomy
  35. 35. Timeline
  36. 36. Questions and Answers

×