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Chinese Women            Rosemary Yee
 Chinese men came to America as laborers, merchants,    and students in the mid-1800s during the Gold Rush    and constru...
 Imbalanced sex ratio due to Page Act of 1875 and  Chinese Exclusion Law of 1882 Older Chinese men married younger Chine...
 Most Chinese women immigrants were illiterate Some were sponsored by Chinese government or  missionary to study in Amer...
 Depends on levels of education   Government sector, interpreters, editors, and teachers   Laborers in restaurants, gro...
 Not active in mainstream politics Active in Chinese community politics   Spoke against the slavery system in China tha...
 We learned about the life of Chinese women in America at the turn of 1900 by studying their family life, educational att...
1. Huping Ling, Surviving on the Gold Mountain, (New York: SUNY Press, 1998), EBSCOhost., 89.2. Ibid., 41.3. Ibid., 85.4. ...
16. Ibid., 25.17. Ling, Surviving on the Gold Mountain, 108.18. Ibid., 70.19. Ibid., 61.20. Ibid., 76.21. Ibid., 4322. Ibi...
   Chinese Women At Work, The National Women’s History Museum, n.d., http://www.nwhm.org/online-exhibits/chinese/26.html....
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Yee r chinese_women

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Yee r chinese_women

  1. 1. Chinese Women Rosemary Yee
  2. 2.  Chinese men came to America as laborers, merchants, and students in the mid-1800s during the Gold Rush and construction of Transcontinental Railroad Anti-Chinese sentiment Page Act of 1875 and Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 Chinese bachelor > Chinese women 114,000 Asians & Pacific Islanders (0.15% of total U.S. population, Census 1900)  4,000 Chinese women immigrants  2,000 American-born Chinese women
  3. 3.  Imbalanced sex ratio due to Page Act of 1875 and Chinese Exclusion Law of 1882 Older Chinese men married younger Chinese women  Lived happily ever after  Domestic ally abused  Ran away  divorced Chinese men worked hard to earn money and brought their wives to America later  Make decisions and earn money together
  4. 4.  Most Chinese women immigrants were illiterate Some were sponsored by Chinese government or missionary to study in America 1900 – 1910  At least 24 Chinese female college students  The largest group of Asian female in American colleges  Established the Chinese American Boy Scouts of the United States  The first four graduates:  medical degrees  The most famous graduates:  the three Soong sisters
  5. 5.  Depends on levels of education  Government sector, interpreters, editors, and teachers  Laborers in restaurants, grocery stores, laundries, and farms; seamstress, and nannies Slavery  Girls in China were traded or kidnapped  Smuggled to America as prostitutes  Some prostitutes tried to run away  Addicted to alcohol and drugs  Committed suicide  Died of venereal diseases
  6. 6.  Not active in mainstream politics Active in Chinese community politics  Spoke against the slavery system in China that brought many Chinese women to America as servants, concubines, or prostitutes  Encouraged others to join revolutionary efforts to overthrow the Qing dynasty in China in 1911 Chinese American Women voted for the first time in California  1911 - Local election  1912 - U.S. presidential election
  7. 7.  We learned about the life of Chinese women in America at the turn of 1900 by studying their family life, educational attainment, employment opportunities, and political involvement Their equality and achievement depended heavily on their education level and their social status One hundred years later, Chinese American women are more educated and independent as they continue to fight for social equality
  8. 8. 1. Huping Ling, Surviving on the Gold Mountain, (New York: SUNY Press, 1998), EBSCOhost., 89.2. Ibid., 41.3. Ibid., 85.4. Ibid., 85.5. Ibid., 95.6. Ibid., 96.7. Ibid.8. Huping Ling, “A History of Chinese Female Students in the United States, 1880s-1990s,” Journal of American Ethnic History, 16, No. 3 (Spring, 1997): 87.9. Ibid., 84.10. Ibid., 8311. Hua Liang, “Fighting for a New Life: Social and Patriotic Activism of Chinese American Women in New York City, 1900 to 1945,” Journal of American Ethnic History, 17, No. 2 (Winter,1998): 25.12. Ling, “A History of Chinese Female Students,” 83.13. Ibid., 87.14. Liang, “Fighting for a New Life,” 26.15. Ibid., 27.
  9. 9. 16. Ibid., 25.17. Ling, Surviving on the Gold Mountain, 108.18. Ibid., 70.19. Ibid., 61.20. Ibid., 76.21. Ibid., 4322. Ibid., 52.23. Ibid.24. Ibid.,56.25. Ibid., 57.26. Ibid., 105.27. Ibid., 106.28. Ibid.29. Ibid., 108.
  10. 10.  Chinese Women At Work, The National Women’s History Museum, n.d., http://www.nwhm.org/online-exhibits/chinese/26.html. Hua Liang, “Fighting for a New Life: Social and Patriotic Activism of Chinese American Women in New York City, 1900 to 1945,” Journal of American Ethnic History, 17, No. 2 (Winter,1998): 22-38, http://www.jstor.org/stable/27502268. Huping Ling, “A History of Chinese Female Students in the United States, 1880s-1990s,” Journal of American Ethnic History, 16, No. 3 (Spring, 1997): 81-109, http://www.jstor.org/stable/27502268. Huping Ling, Surviving on the Gold Mountain, (New York: SUNY Press, 1998), EBSCOhost. The Three Soong Sisters - Three Women Who Changed the Course of Chinese History, Cultural China, last modified 2010, http://history.cultural-china.com/en/48History7178.html. U.S. Census Bureau, “Demographic Trends in the 20thCentury”, Nov 2002. U.S. Census Bureau, “Selected Historical Decennial Census Population and Housing Counts”, 1990. U.S. National Archives Photostream, U.S. National Archives, last modified 2012, http://www.flickr.com/photos/usnationalarchives/5658036707/. William Wong, Jean Quan, Oakland’s Next Mayor, Completes 99-Year Journey,” SFGate.com Blog, Nov 11, 2011, http://blog.sfgate.com/wwong/category/oakland-ca/. Yoke Leen, The National Women’s History Museum, n.d., http://www.nwhm.org/online-exhibits/chinese/25.html.

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