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Rising to the challenge of the digital age

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Keynote to the Irish Learning Technology Association Conference, EdTech 2016, Dublin 27 May 2016.

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Rising to the challenge of the digital age

  1. 1. Rising to the challenge of education in a digital age: who are the leaders now? Professor Rhona Sharpe Oxford Brookes University rsharpe@brookes.ac.uk @rjsharpe
  2. 2. Building on the Jisc FE Digital Student Study Kodak by Tara R on Flickr, CC-BY-NC 2.0)
  3. 3. Building on the Jisc FE Digital Student Study Kodak by Tara R on Flickr, CC-BY-NC 2.0)
  4. 4. The path of disruptive innovation Christensen, C. M. and Eyring, H. J. (2011) The Innovative University: Changing the DNA of Higher Education from the inside out. Jossey-Bass: San Francisco.
  5. 5. What kind of digital leaders are you: knowledgeable
  6. 6. What kind of digital leaders are you: knowledgeable Score 6-9: Digital leaders don’t have to be geeks but you do have to know enough about technology to seize opportunities and make good decisions on behalf of your organisation. Consider trying at least two new technologies you have seen used by teachers, learners or other leaders. Soon you will be talking like an expert!   Score 10-14: You have a good understanding of the technologies in current use and can find out more when you have to. But you may lack time to explore emerging technologies or break out of current ways of thinking. Consider exploring at least one new trend in terms of its potential to enhance your organisation.  
  7. 7. Can we build it? http://www.brookes.ac.uk/brookes-virtual-gateway/
  8. 8. http://www.paconsulting.com/our-thinking/higher-education-report-2015/
  9. 9. Why is the pace of innovation slow in HE? Deeply entrenched culture of conservatism Resistance to change among large parts of ageing academic workforce Constraints of inflexible organisational structures, systems and processes Risk aversion of leadership teams and governing bodies.
  10. 10. Can we build it? “The key message to emerge was that institutions felt the substantive challenge was not the pedagogical model they chose to use for open and distance learning (ODL), but planning the configuration of the supporting infrastructure, resources and business models required to support the development and delivery of ODL programmes.” White, D., Warren, N., Faughnan, S. & Manton, M. (2010) Study of UK Online Learning: A report for HEFCE. http://www.hefce.ac.uk/media/hefce/content/pubs/2010/rd1710/rd17_10.pdf
  11. 11. New markets and products? Products Markets Present New Present Market penetration New product development New Ansoff’s growth vector matrix (Ansoff, 1957)
  12. 12. Can UK HEIs plan for growth? https://www.ucas.com/sites/default/files/jan-16-deadline-application-rates-report.pdf
  13. 13. New markets and products? Products Markets Present New Present Market penetration New product development New New market development Diversification Ansoff’s growth vector matrix (Ansoff, 1957)
  14. 14. Exploring the discursive construction of the ‘MOOC’ in newspapers “the findings point to a predominant portrayal of MOOCs in relation to the massification, marketization and monetization of higher education, rather than engaging in debate of either ‘technological’ or ‘educational’ issues such as online learning and pedagogy, instructional design or student experience.” Selwyn, N., Bulfin, S. & Pangrazio, L. (2015) Massive Open Online Change? Exploring the discursive construction of the ‘MOOC’ in newspapers. Higher Education Quarterly, 69 (2), 175-192.
  15. 15. What kind of digital leaders are you: enterprising d a
  16. 16. What kind of digital leaders are you: enterprising d a Score 6-9: Technology is being used to make incremental changes in your way of doing things but there are structural barriers to innovation, especially a risk-avoidant culture. In this climate you will need to push for developments that have already been proven effective by others. Listen to the examples at this conference..   Score 10-14: Technology is well embedded into your organisational processes and you are generally able to bring about change when there is good evidence that it will work. You need now to develop a more agile and innovative approach so that technology trends can work to your advantage. Speak to another digital leader or to an innovator in your own organisation and ask what are the real barriers to change.
  17. 17. What’s the big idea? Pockets of innovation in education and pedagogy are no longer sufficient. Organisational responses are needed to the challenges of the digital age. We all have responsibility for this (shared leadership).
  18. 18. What’s the big idea? Pockets of innovation in education and pedagogy are no longer sufficient. Organisational responses are needed to the challenges of the digital age. We all have responsibility for this (shared leadership). Prepare learners to contribute to the global, networked society (market penetration). Ensure that new business models meet the needs and expectations of digital learners (new product development). Make it easier to disrupt institutional practices (develop and diversify). 3 possible responses
  19. 19. Prepare graduates to contribute to a global, networked society So, as far as you remember, your essay is on one of the university PCs. And, you think I should be able to find it…
  20. 20. Prepare graduates to contribute to a global, networked society Photo credit: Rhona Sharpe
  21. 21. Prepare graduates to contribute to a global, networked society Photo credit: Rhona Sharpe
  22. 22. Prepare graduates to contribute to a global, networked society Photo credit: Rhona Sharpe
  23. 23. The functional access, skills and practices necessary to become a confident, agile adopter of a range of technologies for personal, academic and professional use. https://wiki.brookes.ac.uk/display/slidacases/Oxford+Brookes At Oxford Brookes University, digital and information literacy is defined as ..
  24. 24. What’s at the top of the triangle? Beetham & Sharpe (2010) Bennett (2014), Sharpe (2014) Engaged Connected Confident Adaptable Intentional Self-aware
  25. 25. Brookes Survey of Student Engagement 2014
  26. 26. Ensure new business models meet (and manage) learners’ expectations Perfect. Profile picture sorted. I wonder where the hotel is?
  27. 27. Ensure new business models meet (and manage) learners’ expectations 92% satisfaction with VLE Brookes Barometer 2014 Students value: ability to access materials & contact tutors out of class time Students dissatisfied: downtime Inconsistency in use
  28. 28. Ensure new business models meet (and manage) learners’ expectations Careful, empirical examination of what learners actually do is largely absent’ (Oliver, 2015, p. 367) Oliver, M. (2015) From openness to permeability: reframing open education in terms of positive liberty in the enactment of academic practices. Learning, Media and Technology, 40 (3),
  29. 29. FE Digital Student Project
  30. 30. http://digitalstudent.jiscinvolve.org/
  31. 31. Meeting the needs of all learners Don’t assume we are digitally literate We need ongoing development We want to work with lecturers… Ask us what we need… Prepare and support learners to study successfully with learning technology. Learners typically do not have the digital skills that are often associated with the younger generation.
  32. 32. Make it easier to disrupt institutional practices Welcome to everyone who’s come in today. You’ll be delighted to know that we’re joined by Adele, on the sofa with her table Ben, In Ibiza with his smart phone..
  33. 33. Make it easier to disrupt institutional practices We persistently and perhaps increasingly reinforce the very behaviours we find frustrating by responding to students’ consumers’ desire for content, structure, and especially assessment.’ (Molesworth & Nixon, 2009, p.169)
  34. 34. Make it easier to disrupt institutional practices We persistently and perhaps increasingly reinforce the very behaviours we find frustrating by responding to students’ consumers’ desire for content, structure, and especially assessment.’ (Molesworth & Nixon, 2009, p.169)
  35. 35. OCSLD Open Online Courses - Online mentors employed by several universities (OBHE, 2013) - Expert participants (Waite et al, 2013) - Certificates and badges - Light touch quality assurance - Shared modules and credit transfer - Ability to negotiate staff roles, responsibilities and workload - ‘Third space professionals’ (Whitchurch & Gordon, 2013).
  36. 36. What kind of digital leaders are you: enabling (score range 6-36)
  37. 37. What kind of digital leaders are you: enabling (score range 6-36) Score 6-9: When we are lacking in digital confidence ourselves it is difficult to empower others. You know enough to make good decisions, even if you could not implement the technical solutions yourself. Consider identifying and bringing together at least four people - in different roles - who can help you to bring about the changes you want in your organisation.   Score 10-14: You already know that digital technology can change organisational practices. Take a moment to identify the potential change agents within your organisation - people with the energy and commitment as well as the know-how to do new things with digital technology.
  38. 38. Building digital capability at Oxford Brookes
  39. 39. Building digital capability
  40. 40. Building digital capability at Oxford Brookes
  41. 41. What does this mean for us? policy makers TEL managers practitioners researchers government industry reps learners
  42. 42. Some practical ideas (take your pick) Use your communications team to publicise how learners develop digital practices through their programmes and put them to use after they leave. Offer support to course teams with aspects of digital literacy that are difficult to develop e.g. online collaboration, using technology to reflect on and record learning. Provide faculty academic managers with more freedom to allocate funding and allocation of staff time to experimental projects, which might require staff to work outside of their usual roles Locate TEL innovations within the third space, taking advantage of the fluidity of roles and structures which allow new educational models to be developed and implemented. Conduct regular investigations of learners’ digital practices and integrate the findings into the key decision gateways for course design and delivery.
  43. 43. Developing our digital leaders Access the course resources www.moodle.openbrookes.net Register your interest in a future course http://bitly.com/1HTQanc
  44. 44. Acknowledgements Cartoons by Bob Pomfret, Oxford Brookes University ‘What kind of digital leader are you?’ quiz by Helen Beethem for the ETF/ELMAG/OCSLD online course ‘Developing Digital Leaders. www.moodle.openbrookes.net Digital Capabilities website developed by Richard Francis and Mark Childs, and presented to Jisc Student Experience Experts Group, April 2016, https://www.jisc.ac.uk/events/student-experience-experts- group-meeting-20-apr-2016#resources
  45. 45. References Bennett, L. (2014) Learning from the early adopter: developing the digital practitioner, Research in Learning Technology, 22: 21453 Molesworth, M. & Nixon, L. (2009) Frustrated aspirations: discovering the limits of a virtual learning environment in V. Bamber, P. Trowler, M. Saunders & P. Knight (eds) Enhancing Learning, Teaching, Assessment and Curriculum in Higher Education, pp. 164-171, Maidenhead: SRHE/OUP OBHE (2013) Horizon Scanning: What will higher education look like in 2020?, Observatory of Borderless Higher Education. Oliver, M. (2015) From openness to permeability: reframing open education in terms of positive liberty in the enactment of academic practices. Learning, Media and Technology, 40 (3), 365-384. Sharpe, R. (2014), What does it take to learn in next generation learning spaces?, in Kym Fraser (ed.) The Future of Learning and Teaching in Next Generation Learning Spaces (International Perspectives on Higher Education Research, Volume 12), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, pp.123-146. Sharpe, R. & Beetham, H. (2010) Understanding students’ uses of technology for learning: towards creative appropriation. In Rethinking Learning for a Digital Age. Chapter available to download from http://bit.ly/1RhiRNP Waite, M., Mackness, J., Roberts, G. & Lovegrove, E. (2013) Liminal Participants and Skilled Orienteers: Learner Participation in a MOOC for New Lecturers, Journal of Online Learning and Teaching, 9 (2), http://jolt.merlot.org/vol9no2/waite_0613.htm Whitchurch, C. & Gordon (2013) Staffing models and institutional flexibility, Leadership Foundation for Higher Education: London.

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