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EDUC6751 Knowledge and Communication Technologies
Reframing Reality and Representation: Living in the Cinematic Society   LECTURE ONE Robert J Parkes, PhD
Welcome to the ‘Hermetically Sealed’  Pleasure Dome <ul><li>The Media-Saturated Society </li></ul><ul><li>The Society of t...
Media Literacy vs  Technological Competency <ul><li>Technological Competence </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Defined by skills (cons...
Principles of Media Literacy <ul><li>All media messages are constructed </li></ul><ul><li>Each medium has its own language...
Will you take the Red Pill or the Blue Pill? <ul><li>Critical Theory  – We can crack the code and see things as they reall...
The Second Media Age <ul><li>From  </li></ul><ul><li>Commercial Mass  Broadcast  Media with few producers and many  consum...
Key Features of  New Media Technologies <ul><li>Non-Hierarchical Organisation  </li></ul><ul><li>Non-Linear (Digital vs An...
Course Overview <ul><li>Explore the ways in which new technologies can be used to support and extend student learning.  </...
Vygotsky’s  Zone of Proximal Development Concept Collaboration with  More Capable Peer Actual Level of Development Level o...
Vygotsky’s Triangle and  the Concept of ‘Tool Mediation’ Mediator  (Tools) Subject (Self) Object (World) No Unmediated Acc...
A Pragmatist’s Interpretation of  Vygotsky’s Hermeneutic Triangle Mediational Means  (Tools, Maps, Instruments, Gauges, Te...
Generating and Extending a ZPD through the Process of ‘Tool’ and ‘Tutor’ Mediation Tutored by More Capable Peer  &/or Prov...
Throwing down the gauntlet:  New Media and the raising of expectations New Media Information Communication Technologies  A...
Distributed Cognition and the Non-Neutrality of Technology <ul><li>Cognition is socially shared  –  Tutor as Mediator </li...
Example 1: Using a Ruler to ‘Count On’ <ul><li>5 + 7 = </li></ul><ul><li>9 + 6 =   </li></ul>
Tools from the Perspective  of Distributed Cognition <ul><li>What ‘ideas’ does the tool you are thinking about using embod...
Example 2: Fencing Foil vs Samurai Katana
Using technology to extend  student’s capabilities <ul><li>What is it that  databases  can do for us  that we couldn’t do ...
Example 3:  ICT, Visual Representation, and Mediating Cognitive Connections
Example 3:  ICT, Visual Representation, and Mediating Cognitive Connections
Orientations to  New Media Technologies <ul><li>Celebratory Optimists </li></ul><ul><li>Qualified Optimists </li></ul><ul>...
Ways of Knowing <ul><li>Technical Knowing   demonstrated by skill and control of the media technology being deployed. </li...
Course Objectives <ul><li>Relate relevant pedagogical frameworks and curriculum models to classroom use of new technologie...
Project-Based Learning PHASE 2 <<  CONSTRUCT  >> PHASE 3 <<  DISTRIBUTE  >> & <<  EVALUATE  >> PHASE 1 <<  DESIGN  >>
Design & Production Phase: Ways of Knowing <ul><li>Technical Knowing   demonstrated by skill and control of the media tech...
Evaluation Phase: The Frames <ul><li>Subjective Frame:  Your personal intuitive, emotional, and/or sensory response to med...
What’s On Next? <ul><li>Coming Up - Tutorial: Getting Started on the Design Brief </li></ul><ul><li>Next Lecture: Digital ...
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Educ6751(1)

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Reframing Reality and Representation: Living in the Cinematic Society

First lecture in my Knowledge and Communication Technologies media literacy and production course.

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Educ6751(1)

  1. 1. EDUC6751 Knowledge and Communication Technologies
  2. 2. Reframing Reality and Representation: Living in the Cinematic Society LECTURE ONE Robert J Parkes, PhD
  3. 3. Welcome to the ‘Hermetically Sealed’ Pleasure Dome <ul><li>The Media-Saturated Society </li></ul><ul><li>The Society of the Spectacle (Debord, 1967) </li></ul><ul><li>Simulation and the Simulacrum (Baudrillard, 1981) </li></ul><ul><li>The Cinematic Society (Denzin, 1995) </li></ul><ul><li>A Post-Literate Age (Rosenstone, 2001) </li></ul><ul><li>The Second Media Age (Poster, 1995) </li></ul>
  4. 4. Media Literacy vs Technological Competency <ul><li>Technological Competence </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Defined by skills (constructed as ‘neutral tools’) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Media Literacy </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Production, Representation, and Reception (exposes purpose-driven, value-laden, and culturally-historically situated nature of technology) </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Principles of Media Literacy <ul><li>All media messages are constructed </li></ul><ul><li>Each medium has its own language of representation </li></ul><ul><li>Audiences experience the same media message differently </li></ul><ul><li>All media messages carry values and points of view </li></ul><ul><li>Media messages are produced for specific social and economic purposes </li></ul>
  6. 6. Will you take the Red Pill or the Blue Pill? <ul><li>Critical Theory – We can crack the code and see things as they really are. Understanding the code lets us resist media messages. (Giroux, McLaren, etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>Poststructuralism – There is no outside of the Matrix. Even when we think we are outside, we are inside another Matrix. (Baudrillard, Foucault, etc.) </li></ul>
  7. 7. The Second Media Age <ul><li>From </li></ul><ul><li>Commercial Mass Broadcast Media with few producers and many consumers </li></ul><ul><li>To </li></ul><ul><li>Indie Digital and Social Networking Media with many producers and many consumers </li></ul>
  8. 8. Key Features of New Media Technologies <ul><li>Non-Hierarchical Organisation </li></ul><ul><li>Non-Linear (Digital vs Analogue) </li></ul><ul><li>Flexible (Synchronous or Asynchronous) </li></ul><ul><li>Relational (Networked) </li></ul><ul><li>Continuous Connectivity </li></ul><ul><li>Public by Default, Private by Design </li></ul><ul><li>Profiling and Surveillance </li></ul><ul><li>Approximate Professional Production </li></ul>
  9. 9. Course Overview <ul><li>Explore the ways in which new technologies can be used to support and extend student learning. </li></ul><ul><li>Through project-based tasks develop the capacity and confidence to employ digital devices and software applications to construct and communicate new knowledge in and beyond the classroom. </li></ul><ul><li>Consider the social impact of technology. </li></ul><ul><li>Explore frameworks for thinking about the pedagogical use of new technologies. </li></ul><ul><li>Understand digital, visual and media literacy; and information literacy processes. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Vygotsky’s Zone of Proximal Development Concept Collaboration with More Capable Peer Actual Level of Development Level of Potential Development Zone of Proximal Development
  11. 11. Vygotsky’s Triangle and the Concept of ‘Tool Mediation’ Mediator (Tools) Subject (Self) Object (World) No Unmediated Access to the World
  12. 12. A Pragmatist’s Interpretation of Vygotsky’s Hermeneutic Triangle Mediational Means (Tools, Maps, Instruments, Gauges, Technologies, Diagrams, Models, Theories, Languages, Charts, Principles, Assumptions, Attitudes, etc.) Subject (Self) Object (World) No Unmediated Access to the World
  13. 13. Generating and Extending a ZPD through the Process of ‘Tool’ and ‘Tutor’ Mediation Tutored by More Capable Peer &/or Provided with Mediating Tools Zone of Dynamic Development Actual Level of Development Level of Potential Development
  14. 14. Throwing down the gauntlet: New Media and the raising of expectations New Media Information Communication Technologies Allow students to approximate professional productions Zone of Dynamic Development Actual Level of Development Level of Potential Development
  15. 15. Distributed Cognition and the Non-Neutrality of Technology <ul><li>Cognition is socially shared – Tutor as Mediator </li></ul><ul><li>Cognition stretches across individuals and artefacts – Tool as Mediator </li></ul>
  16. 16. Example 1: Using a Ruler to ‘Count On’ <ul><li>5 + 7 = </li></ul><ul><li>9 + 6 = </li></ul>
  17. 17. Tools from the Perspective of Distributed Cognition <ul><li>What ‘ideas’ does the tool you are thinking about using embody? In other words, what are its affordances and constraints? </li></ul><ul><li>What does this tool make easier, or more effective (or more difficult)? What does the tool offer us that we couldn’t do without it? </li></ul>
  18. 18. Example 2: Fencing Foil vs Samurai Katana
  19. 19. Using technology to extend student’s capabilities <ul><li>What is it that databases can do for us that we couldn’t do without them? </li></ul><ul><li>What is it that non-linear digital video editing suites can do for us that we couldn’t do without them? </li></ul><ul><li>What is it that word processing applications can do for us that we couldn’t do without them? </li></ul>
  20. 20. Example 3: ICT, Visual Representation, and Mediating Cognitive Connections
  21. 21. Example 3: ICT, Visual Representation, and Mediating Cognitive Connections
  22. 22. Orientations to New Media Technologies <ul><li>Celebratory Optimists </li></ul><ul><li>Qualified Optimists </li></ul><ul><li>Sceptics </li></ul>
  23. 23. Ways of Knowing <ul><li>Technical Knowing demonstrated by skill and control of the media technology being deployed. </li></ul><ul><li>Hermeneutic Knowing demonstrated by the construction of a meaningful narrative that indicates attention to audience reception, cultural-historical context, social purpose and convention. </li></ul><ul><li>Critical Knowing demonstrated by evidence of self-reflective engagement with your topic. </li></ul>
  24. 24. Course Objectives <ul><li>Relate relevant pedagogical frameworks and curriculum models to classroom use of new technologies. </li></ul><ul><li>Use technology as a tool to facilitate quality teaching and learning. </li></ul><ul><li>Construct and communicate new knowledge using digital devices and software applications. </li></ul><ul><li>Display an understanding of critical, digital, visual, media, and information literacy. </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstrate a capacity to work collaboratively on a project-based learning task. </li></ul><ul><li>Explain the social impact of new technologies. </li></ul>
  25. 25. Project-Based Learning PHASE 2 << CONSTRUCT >> PHASE 3 << DISTRIBUTE >> & << EVALUATE >> PHASE 1 << DESIGN >>
  26. 26. Design & Production Phase: Ways of Knowing <ul><li>Technical Knowing demonstrated by skill and control of the media technology being deployed. </li></ul><ul><li>Hermeneutic Knowing demonstrated by the construction of a meaningful narrative that indicates attention to audience reception, cultural-historical context, social purpose and convention. </li></ul><ul><li>Critical Knowing demonstrated by evidence of self-reflective engagement with your topic. </li></ul>
  27. 27. Evaluation Phase: The Frames <ul><li>Subjective Frame: Your personal intuitive, emotional, and/or sensory response to media artefacts. </li></ul><ul><li>Cultural Frame: The meaning of a media artefact in relation to the social, cultural, political, and/or historical milieu of its production or reception. </li></ul><ul><li>Structural Frame: How the media artefact has mobilised visual language, verbal language, musical language, or other technical/symbolic systems to make meaning; and how its codes and conventions, signs and symbols, might be understood or interpreted by a literate viewer, listener, responder, or player. </li></ul><ul><li>Postmodern Frame: How a media artefact repeats, reinterprets, rejects, and/or reconceptualises other pre-existing texts/artefacts. </li></ul>
  28. 28. What’s On Next? <ul><li>Coming Up - Tutorial: Getting Started on the Design Brief </li></ul><ul><li>Next Lecture: Digital Natives? Children of the Net Generation </li></ul>

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