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Bruce Carlisle Massachusetts Ocean Management: Capacity to develop and implement plan

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Bruce Carlisle Massachusetts Ocean Management: Capacity to develop and implement plan

  1. 1. Massachusetts Ocean Management:  Capacity to develop  and implement plan Bruce K. Carlisle Office of Coastal Zone Management Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs
  2. 2. Outline • Background on Plan  development and  implementation • Brief overview of Plan • Capacity to implement: – Needs – Resources – Partnerships • Take away points
  3. 3. Ocean Act of 2008 • Ocean Management Task Force 2003‐2004: set of  findings and recommendations • Act directs Secretary of EEA to develop integrated  ocean management plan by December 31, 2009 • 15 directives, including:  – Develop siting priorities, locations, and standards for  allowed uses, facilities, activities – Identify and protect special, sensitive, and unique  estuarine and marine life and habitats – Foster sustainable uses – Support infrastructure necessary for economy and  quality of life • All state approvals must be consistent with Plan
  4. 4. Jurisdictional  boundaries Ocean planning area
  5. 5. Uses, activities and facilities  subject to management Renewable energy ‐ Wind energy  ‐ Tidal energy ‐ Wave energy Extraction of sand and gravel for beach  nourishment and shore protection Telecommunication and electric cables Pipelines for natural gas Fish and shellfish aquaculture
  6. 6. From Ocean Act to Ocean Plan (May 2008 *) (December 2009) Ocean  Ocean Act Plan  Data  Siting and  Plan Goals and  acquisition & compatibility  development strategies development assessment Plan objectives Develop plan  Natural  Functional compatibility  Decision‐making  analysis based on  resources guidance synthesis of  Human uses Qualitative cumulative  spatial and  Blueprint for  impacts/effects Use siting  management  adaptive  preferences Other policy calls elements  framework
  7. 7. Stakeholder process and participation • Developing DRAFT plan: – Technical workgroups: data, science, technology  – Public meetings throughout coast as well as inland  communities – Ocean Advisory Commission and Science Advisory  Council meetings – More than 100 individual stakeholder meetings – Five public workshops • Vetting DRAFT plan: – Public comments: >300 letters, input – 5 formal hearings – 25 informational meetings
  8. 8. Ocean Plan • Draft Plan issued June  2009 • Final Plan promulgated  December 2009 • Volume I – Management – Administration • Volume II – Baseline Assessment – Science Framework
  9. 9. Ocean Plan • Prohibited area: – Uses, activities and  facilities prohibited • Renewable energy  areas: – 2 areas: Gosnold,  Vineyard – Commercial‐scale wind • Multi‐use area: – Siting and performance  standards apply
  10. 10. Capacity needs • Internal: – Leadership, senior policy  vetting and decision‐ making – Policy & planning  capabilities across subject  areas – Technical, science  expertise across   disciplines / fields – GIS / mapping – Administration, logistics
  11. 11. Capacity needs • External: – Engagement with public,  stakeholders, interests  through different forums – Data and information – Contextual /background:  examples, relevant models,  decision tools – Communication /  interaction support
  12. 12. Capacity resources • Internal: – Cabinet level ownership  and engagement  (Executive Office EEA) – Executive and Legislative  branch support – “All hands”: Policy,  planning, technical,  science, GIS and other  staff – ~ $2.5M: state operating  & capital, federal CZM  grant 
  13. 13. Capacity resources • External: – Massachusetts Ocean  Partnership   (~$4.5M from Moore  Foundation *) – Ocean Advisory  Commission – Ocean Science Advisory  Council – Federal agencies,  NGOs, Universities, etc.
  14. 14. Partnerships • State agency collaboration – Exceptionally strong  joint  work and coordination on key  issues: critical habitats,  fishing, seafloor/geology ,  energy – EEA / CZM lead, other  agencies critical – 56 staff involved • Technical workgroups &  stakeholders – Data and information:  foundation
  15. 15. Partnerships • Massachusetts Ocean  Partnership (SeaPlan) – Critical public/private  relationship and support – Stakeholder workshops,  events, discussions – Information support:  – Synopsis, analysis of other  ocean planning  models/tools – Decision support tools:  cumulative impacts, trade‐ offs, valuations, etc.
  16. 16. Partnerships • Ocean Advisory  Commission – Fishing, environmental, &  renewable energy reps – Legislators  – Reps from all 6 coastal  regions (RPAs) ‐ including  Mayor of Gloucester,  former Mayor of New  Bedford, Cape Cod and  Martha’s Vineyard  Commissions
  17. 17. Partnerships • Science Advisory Council – Academic institutions:  UMass Boston, Dartmouth – Private, non‐profits: CLF,  Batelle, NE Aquarium – Expertise: fisheries,  geology, marine mammals,  ecology, economics • Federal agencies – NOAA, BOEM (MMS),  USGS, Corps, EPA, FWS,  Coast Guard
  18. 18. Take away points • High profile: resources = scope / scale of effort – “All‐hands” – Core planning team – GIS: maps and more maps – Massachusetts Ocean Partnership • High level advisory bodies – Ground‐truthing – Politics • Ongoing, sustained attention – Promulgate Plan  … whew … but then work not done – Regulations, coastal program plan, project review – Addressing priority science and data gaps
  19. 19. mass.gov/eea/oceanplan Bruce Carlisle 617.626.1205 Bruce.Carlisle@state.ma.us

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