Department of Urology Biopsy of Prostate  Trans Rectal Ultrasound (TRUS) Biopsy.   Patient Information Booklet
 
What is a TRUS and Biopsy? A TRUS and Biopsy is a trans rectal ultrasound scan and biopsy. A finger-like probe is inserted...
<ul><li>Why do I need a biopsy of my prostate  </li></ul><ul><li>You may have been advised to have a prostate biopsy </li>...
<ul><li>What are the risks?  </li></ul><ul><li>Infection (2%) risk. There is a risk of infection because the back passage ...
<ul><li>Bleeding from  the rectum (back passage) is common and usually settles after 2-3 days but can last up to 2 weeks. ...
Diagram from www.revolutionhealth.com  Compiled by Urology Multidisciplinary team Review date; Jan 2111
Designed by Medical Photography and Illustration AMNCH
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Department of Urology

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Department of Urology

  1. 1. Department of Urology Biopsy of Prostate Trans Rectal Ultrasound (TRUS) Biopsy. Patient Information Booklet
  2. 3. What is a TRUS and Biopsy? A TRUS and Biopsy is a trans rectal ultrasound scan and biopsy. A finger-like probe is inserted into the back passage (rectum) and placed against the prostate gland. A fine needle is passed through the probe to take samples of the prostate. The samples are labelled and sent to the laboratory for testing.
  3. 4. <ul><li>Why do I need a biopsy of my prostate </li></ul><ul><li>You may have been advised to have a prostate biopsy </li></ul><ul><li>because: </li></ul><ul><li>You have had a blood test showing a high PSA level (prostate- specific antigen). PSA is a protein that is released into your blood from your prostate gland. High levels of PSA may be a sign of prostate cancer. High PSA can also be caused by non cancerous disease such as enlargement or inflammation of the prostate (Prostatitis) </li></ul><ul><li>Your Doctor may have felt a hardening of your prostate or that the outline of your prostate was uneven when he carried out the finger examination of your prostate. </li></ul><ul><li>Your doctor may have advised a scan only, in cases of infertility </li></ul><ul><li>Is there any preparation? </li></ul><ul><li>You must inform your doctor if you are taking the </li></ul><ul><li>following drugs </li></ul><ul><li>Aspirin, </li></ul><ul><li>Plavix, </li></ul><ul><li>Warfarin </li></ul><ul><li>This medication will need to be stopped before the </li></ul><ul><li>biopsy and this will be arranged by your doctor. </li></ul><ul><li>You will also be given a prescription for an antibiotic </li></ul><ul><li>medication to be taken before your biopsy. You will be </li></ul><ul><li>given advice on when or how to take this medication by </li></ul><ul><li>your doctor. You will need to start this course the </li></ul><ul><li>morning of biopsy . Please inform the doctor if you </li></ul><ul><li>are allergic to any medications. </li></ul>
  4. 5. <ul><li>What are the risks? </li></ul><ul><li>Infection (2%) risk. There is a risk of infection because the back passage (rectal wall) is not sterile (clean) and bacteria (bugs) may pass into the prostate or bloodstream during the procedure. You will be given antibiotics before and after the procedure to help minimise this risk. </li></ul><ul><li>It is not advisable to have this procedure prior to going on holidays due to risk of infection . </li></ul><ul><li>Clot Retention - Some people may find it difficult to pass urine after the procedure which can be caused by a blood clot which blocks the urine from draining . </li></ul>How will the biopsy be done? You will be asked to lie on a couch on your left side with your knees drawn up to your chin. The ultrasound probe has gel placed on it before it is placed into the back passage to prevent discomfort. Local anaesthetic (numbing medication), is also injected through the probe to numb the area. You may feel a stinging sensation as this is being given, but this does settle quickly. You may also feel like passing urine during the procedure so it would be better to empty your bladder before the biopsy. Usually 6 – 12 samples (biopsies) are taken during the procedure and as each sample is been taken you may hear a “clicking” noise. This may startle you at first. The whole procedure takes about 15 minutes.
  5. 6. <ul><li>Bleeding from the rectum (back passage) is common and usually settles after 2-3 days but can last up to 2 weeks. </li></ul><ul><li>Blood in the urine and semen – most patients will experience some blood in the urine for up to 2 weeks. Blood can appear in the semen for up to 6 weeks after this procedure. </li></ul><ul><li>You may become allergic to the antibiotic you have been given. To avoid this it is important that you let us know if you have ever had any reactions or allergies to antibiotics before. </li></ul><ul><li>After your procedure you will be given an instruction booklet on how to deal with any unwanted effects should they arise. </li></ul><ul><li>If you have any queries please contact 01 4142000 and ask to speak to one of the Urology team. </li></ul>I Unfortunately, biopsy of the prostate is not completely accurate. There is a chance that a small area of cancer may be missed. If the biopsy is negative, further tests on you PSA may be advised, and sometimes a further biopsy may be needed.
  6. 7. Diagram from www.revolutionhealth.com Compiled by Urology Multidisciplinary team Review date; Jan 2111
  7. 8. Designed by Medical Photography and Illustration AMNCH

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