Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Overview of Livestock Judging

8,387 views

Published on

Overview of how to judge beef cattle, sheep, and swine competitively in a livestock judging contest.

Published in: Education
  • Have you ever used the help of ⇒ www.WritePaper.info ⇐? They can help you with any type of writing - from personal statement to research paper. Due to this service you'll save your time and get an essay without plagiarism.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Finally, it's been revealed how you can increase your breast size by two cup sizes... All FULLY Naturally. Just see for yourself... ➤➤ https://dwz1.cc/YYZPZbuh
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Hi there! I just wanted to share a list of sites that helped me a lot during my studies: .................................................................................................................................... www.EssayWrite.best - Write an essay .................................................................................................................................... www.LitReview.xyz - Summary of books .................................................................................................................................... www.Coursework.best - Online coursework .................................................................................................................................... www.Dissertations.me - proquest dissertations .................................................................................................................................... www.ReMovie.club - Movies reviews .................................................................................................................................... www.WebSlides.vip - Best powerpoint presentations .................................................................................................................................... www.WritePaper.info - Write a research paper .................................................................................................................................... www.EddyHelp.com - Homework help online .................................................................................................................................... www.MyResumeHelp.net - Professional resume writing service .................................................................................................................................. www.HelpWriting.net - Help with writing any papers ......................................................................................................................................... Save so as not to lose
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • You can ask here for a help. They helped me a lot an i`m highly satisfied with quality of work done. I can promise you 100% un-plagiarized text and good experts there. Use with pleasure! ⇒ www.HelpWriting.net ⇐
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Dating direct: ❤❤❤ http://bit.ly/369VOVb ❤❤❤
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here

Overview of Livestock Judging

  1. 1. Overview of Livestock Judging Livestock Judging Workshop: Oneida County, New York April 6, 2013 By Cari B. Rincker, Esq.
  2. 2. What is Livestock Judging? • Evaluation of an animal’s characteristics making a comparison to other animals according to the “ideal standard” – What is “ideal” can be somewhat subjective and can change overtime according to trends in the industry – Using both objective and subjective tools • After evaluating each animal, a ranking is assigned to that classPresentation by Jeff Thayne at Iowa State University
  3. 3. My Livestock Judging Experience• Judged in 4-H & FFA – Illinois State 4-H Team (NAILE Champions) – Invited to Judge in Edinburgh, Scotland• Judged at Lake Land College – 1st Place Oral Reasons at National Western Stock Show in Denver, Colorado – 1st Place Overall at the Houston Livestock Show & Rodeo• Judged at Texas A & M University – All-American Livestock Judging Team
  4. 4. My Livestock Coaching ExperienceCoached the ShelbyCounty 4-H LivestockJudging Team in Illinois
  5. 5. What I Do Now with Livestock Judging• Owner of Rincker Cattle Co. – SimAngus beef cattle operation in Shelbyville, Illinois• Judge beef cattle shows at the local, state, national, and international level – Occasionally judge pigs, sheep & goats
  6. 6. How Livestock Judging Helps Me As an Agriculture Attorney• Analytical Skills• Public Speaking Skills• Organizational Skills• Short-term memorization• Persuasive arguments
  7. 7. Benefits of Livestock Judging “Judging instills confidence in those people who may be timid and humbles those who tend to be conceited.” – Harlan Ritchie (Michigan State University)Presentation by Jeff Thayne at Iowa State University
  8. 8. What Is A Livestock Judging Contest?• Ranking of livestock animals – 4 animals to a class – Identified with Numbers – Compared to the Official Placing (by a Judge or Committee)
  9. 9. What Is A Livestock Judging Contest?Beef Cattle, Meat Sheep,& Pigs – Some contests have wool sheep, meat goats, and horses – Separate contests for dairy, poultry & rabbits (typically)
  10. 10. What Is A Livestock Judging Contest?• Judging 6-12 classes of livestock – Some breeding classes might also have EPD’s• Questions and/or “Oral Reasons”
  11. 11. What We’ll Discuss Today• Beef Cattle – Steers – Heifers – Bulls• Pigs – Gilts – Barrows• Sheep – Market Lambs – Ewes
  12. 12. What We’ll Discuss Today• Expected Progeny Differences (“EPD’s”) for breeding animals• How to Calculate “Cuts”• Taking notes on your “Steno Pad” for Questions or Oral Reasons• Overview of Oral Reasons
  13. 13. Judging Beef Cattle
  14. 14. Learn Your Anatomy
  15. 15. Learn Your Anatomy
  16. 16. Learn Your Wholesale Cuts of Beef
  17. 17. Learn Your Retail Cuts of Beef
  18. 18. Judging (Bred) Heifers • Priorities – Functionality / Ease of Fleshing – Structural Correctness – Balance and Symentry – Growth Performance – Femininity/ Eye Appeal – Muscle – Width of BasePresentation by Jeff Thayne at Iowa State University
  19. 19. Judging (Bred) Heifers Functionality/ Ease of Fleshing (“Easy Keeping” or “Brood Cow Utility”) – Rib shape (depth and outward curvature to rib) – Depth of heart and bold in forerib – Volume – Flesh/ condition – Sound structured – Multiple characteristics go into these termsPresentation by Jeff Thayne at Iowa State University
  20. 20. Judging (Bred) HeifersGrowth Performance – Cattle need to moderate framed • If too big/tall, then tend to be harder keeping and produce market animals with carcass weight problems – Look at length of maturity pattern Photo from Lautner Farms • Length of face, cannon, body, hooks to pins – Look at overall volume and weight of the animal
  21. 21. Judging CattleStructural Correctness – Front foot alignment – Shoulder angle – Strength to topline – Levelness and length of hip – Set to hock Photo from Hanewich Cattle Co. – Set to pastern – Heaviness of structurePresentation by Jeff Thayne at Iowa State University
  22. 22. Judging Bulls• “Butts, Nuts & Guts” – Muscularity – Athletism – Structural Soundness – Rib/Volume – Testicle Size/ Scrotal Circumference Photo from Oklahoma State
  23. 23. Judging Market Steers • Priorities: – Muscle – Market Readiness/ Correctness of Finish – Rib and Feeding Ability – Structural Soundness Photo from Lautner Farms – Balance and Eye AppealPresentation by Jeff Thayne at Iowa State University
  24. 24. Judging Market Steers • Muscle Indicators – Quarter – Rib – Loin – Stifle – Forearm Photo from Gregory FarmsPresentation by Jeff Thayne at Iowa State University
  25. 25. Judging Market Steers • Finish Indicators – Brisket – Over Ribs – Pins/ Around Tailhead – Flank – Cod FatPhoto from Lautner Farms Presentation by Jeff Thayne at Iowa State University
  26. 26. Judging Market Steers • Evaluating Rib/ Feeding Ability – Steers should possess dimension to their skeleton in terms of chest width and center body shape to ensure efficiency in a feedlot setting and the ability to deposit finish • Width of chest • Depth of body • Rib Shape • Uniformity of body depthPresentation by Jeff Thayne at Iowa State University
  27. 27. Judging Market Steers • Evaluating Balance and Eye Appeal – The steer should be proportional – Look at how the steer balance from the profile • Length of neck • Levelness of topline and hip Photo from Rodgers Cattle • Smooth pattern • General attractivenessPresentation by Jeff Thayne at Iowa State University
  28. 28. Let’s Judge a Class of Market SteersPhoto by Lautner Farms
  29. 29. Feedlot Market Steers Profile 1 2 4 3Presentation by Drew Obermeyer from K-State
  30. 30. Feedlot Market Steers Rear View 1 2 3 4Presentation by Drew Obermeyer from K-State
  31. 31. Write Your Placing Down
  32. 32. How Did You Place It?My Placing: 3-2-4-1 We’ll discuss how to calculate your score later. Just write it down right now.Cuts: 2-5-3Note: I differed opinion from K-State. K-State Placed it 2-3-4-1 with cuts of 3-4-5.This also illustrates that there is no one right answer – judges/officials will havedifferent preferences.
  33. 33. We’ll Talk More About Reasons Later• Overview – Divide class into 3 pairs – Describe why you placed the class the way you did – Read & learn the terminology in the Livestock judging Team Manual Livestock Judging Teammates from Texas A & M University – Example sets of reasons for your reference
  34. 34. Market Steer: Reasons Example # 1 • I placed this class of feedlot steers 2-3-4-1. The red steer wins as he best combines yield and quality grade. He shows the most natural shape down his top, over the loin and is thicker and more expressive through his quarter. Additionally, he is more structurally sound, being more neatly laid through the shoulder than 3. He should hang the carcass receiving a lower numerical yield than 3. 3 is longer sided. However he is fatter and straighter through his shoulder than 2, so he is second. • Nevertheless it is 3 over 4 in the middle pair. The black steer is the thicker topped, wider based steer of the pair that should produce the more muscular carcass. I realize the Hereford appearing steer is sounder made, however he is lighter muscled, being flatter through the quarter and narrower based when viewed from the rear, so he is third. • Yet in the bottom pair, its 4 over 1. 4 is more market ready as he shows more evidence of finish over his rib, around his tailhead and is fuller in the flank. Additionally he is higher volumed, have more depth and dimension to his rib. Yes, the yellow steer is leaner, but he is the furthest from his endpoint and should hang the least desirable carcass of the four, so he is last.By Drew Obermeyer from K-State
  35. 35. Market Steer Reasons Example # 2 • I place the market steers 2341. In the top pair I place 2 over 3. 2 is the heavies muscled, most expressively shaped steer that should rail the most shapely carcass. I grant that 3 is longer sided. But I faulted him and placed him 2nd, he is heavier conditioned and straight in his shoulder. • In my middle pair I placed 3 over 4. 3 is a wider based, thicker topped steer that should rail a heavier muscled carcass. I grant that 4 is sounder structured but he is also light muscled and narrow based. • In my bottom pair I placed 4 over 1. 4 is the bigger bodied steer that appears to have been easier feeding. Also I would expect him to be safer grading. I realize 1 is leaner made, but he is the lightest muscled and barest finished steer in class.By Drew Obermeyer from K-State
  36. 36. Market Steer Reasons Example # 3 • My preferred alignment of the Market steers is 2341. Starting the class with a pair of heavier muscled, more complete steers, and of the pair I preferred the added advantages in expression to align him over 3. 2 is a long patterned, trimmer conditioned steer that measures longer and wider out of his hip. I appreciate the softer, more market ready look of 3 yet he also gets plainer in his design and a little courser fronted. • However despite these criticisms, 3 is a heavier muscled more correctly finished steer that has more volume and expression of muscle out of his hip and due to his external indicators suggest that he should be safer to role the choice stamp. I realize that 4 is bolder ribbed, however the Hereford is also the heaviest finished, shortest coupled steer in the class. • In my concluding pair of lighter muscled steers I still preferred the body and depth of 4. He is deeper bodied, bolder sprung steer that has a softer look and is closer to a marketable endpoint, I understand that they yellow steer is longer bodied cleaner designed, yet he is the flattest, narrowest made, lightest muscled steer in the class.By Drew Obermeyer from K-State
  37. 37. Judging Pigs
  38. 38. Learn Your Anatomy
  39. 39. Learn Your Wholesale Cuts of Pork
  40. 40. Learn Your Retail Cuts of Pork
  41. 41. Judging Breeding Swine (Gilts)Priorities – Scale/ Growth – Lean / Condition – Structural Correctness/ Functionality • Helps to ensure sow longevity – Internal Dimension/ Rib Photo from Dick Kuecker & Sons – Skeletal Width and Dimension – Balance and Eye Appeal – Muscle Content – Maternal characteristicsPresentation by Jeff Thayne at Iowa State University
  42. 42. Judging Gilts • Condition – Leanness is important with breeding swine – Don’t want females to be too heavy conditioned but an adequate degree of condition is needed Photo from National Swine Registry for sound reproductive intervalsPresentation by Jeff Thayne at Iowa State University
  43. 43. Judging Gilts • Maternal Characteristics – Vulva • Estrus Detection • Upturned/ Tipped • Infantile – Underline • Pin Nipples/ Blunt Teats • Size and spacing issues Hint: These are GREAT for questions and oral reasons. Take lots of notes! • CountPresentation by Jeff Thayne at Iowa State University
  44. 44. Judging Swine • Skeletal Width and Dimension – Width of Chest – Square Rib Design – Depth of Flank – Natural Base Width at the Ground – Ability to Convert Feed Photo from gctelegram.com to GainPresentation by Jeff Thayne at Iowa State University
  45. 45. Judging Swine • Balance and Eye Appeal – Proportional Skeleton – Attractive and well balanced look from the profile • Levelness of topline and hip • Strength behind the blades and to Loin • Quality to hair and skin coat Photo from Sharrett Family Farms – Structural Correctness • Looseness of skeleton and mobilityPresentation by Jeff Thayne at Iowa State University
  46. 46. Judging Market HogsPay attention to whetherthey are gilts or barrows – Especially for Questions and Reasons (ID’s, proper pronouns like “he” “she”) – Gilts are typically leaner than barrows
  47. 47. Judging Market Hogs• Priorities – Muscle Content – Lean Growth – Skeletal Width and Dimension – Structural Photo of Kelly Goneke Correctness – Balance and Eye AppealPresentation by Jeff Thayne at Iowa State University
  48. 48. Judging Market Hogs • Indicators of Muscles – Ham – Loin – Dimple at Ham-Loin Junction – Grove down top – Forearm – Blades Photo from the National Swine Registry – StiflePresentation by Jeff Thayne at Iowa State University
  49. 49. Judging Market Hogs• Indicators of Leaness – Jowl – Over blades – Elbow pocket – Loin Edge – Seam of ham Photo from Swinegenetics.com – Lower one-third of bodyPresentation by Jeff Thayne at Iowa State University
  50. 50. Judging SheepPhoto from WestsideConnect.com
  51. 51. Judging Ewes & Rams (Breeding Sheep) • Priorities – Growth and Performance • Frame • Length – Functionality/ Rib Photo from Strat Hearl Suffolks – Balance and Eye Appeal – Structural correctness – MusclePresentation by Jeff Thayne at Iowa State University
  52. 52. Judging Breeding Sheep• Balance, Eye Appeal and Structural Soundness – Length and smoothness of front end – Cleanliness thru shoulder and chest – Levelness of topline and hip – Pasterns – Length of stride Photo from DDJ SuffolksPresentation by Jeff Thayne at Iowa State University
  53. 53. Judging Market Lambs • Priorities – Muscle – Correctness of finish – Growth and Weight – Skeletal Correctness – Balance and Eye Appeal From www.agri-media.ca *Pay attention to sexPresentation by Jeff Thayne at Iowa State University
  54. 54. Judging Market Lambs • Muscle Indicators – Rack – Loin – Hip – Leg – Forearm Photo from Rennvue FarmsPresentation by Jeff Thayne at Iowa State University
  55. 55. Judging Market Lambs • Finish Indicators – Breast/ Chest Plate – Ribs – Flank – Twist Photo from Oklahoma ReportPresentation by Jeff Thayne at Iowa State University
  56. 56. Judging Market Lambs • Growth Indicators – Length of head, neck, cannon bone and hindsaddle – Height at the top of the shoulders – Length of body Photo from South Dakota State Fair – WeightPresentation by Jeff Thayne at Iowa State University
  57. 57. Judging Market LambsSkeletal Correctness – Angle to shoulder and knee – Appropriate set to pastern – Levelness of top and dock set – Square set from hock to ground from behind – Heaviness of structure Photo from KearnyHub.comPresentation by Jeff Thayne at Iowa State University
  58. 58. Judging Market Lambs • Balance and Eye Appeal – Proportionalism – Trim chested/ clean fronted – Length and smoothless of front end – Level topline and square hip Photo from Thomas Show Lambs – Attractive rib designPresentation by Jeff Thayne at Iowa State University
  59. 59. Market Lambs Profile 1 2 43Presentation by Drew Obermeyer from K-State
  60. 60. Market Lambs Rear View 1 2 3 4Presentation by Drew Obermeyer from K-State
  61. 61. Market Lambs Top View 1 2 3 4Presentation by Drew Obermeyer from K-State
  62. 62. Market Lambs Front View 1 2 3 4Presentation by Drew Obermeyer from K-State
  63. 63. Write Down Your Placing
  64. 64. OfficialMy Placing: 4-1-2- We’ll discuss how to calculate your score later. Just write it down right now.3Cuts: 3-5-2 Note: I differed opinion from K-State on the bottom pair. K-State placed the class 4-1-3-2 with the same cuts This also illustrates that there is no one right answer – judges/officials will have different preferences.
  65. 65. Market Lambs: Reasons Example # 1 • I placed the market lambs 4-1-3-2. In the top pair of more muscular wethers, I personally like the blue sheep to win. For me, he ties his muscularility into a bigger, more correctly finished package. Not only is 4 a taller fronted lamb, that is longer measuring from his last rib back. But this compliments the fact that he is a cleaner profiling lamb that is leaner to touch. I would expect him to have an advantage in cutability. True, 1 is a heavier weight lamb that wraps with a bigger leg. However, I placed him second because he is a heavy middled lamb that is deep in his sternum. • However, 1 is a more powerfully muscled, growthier lamb, and needs to beat 3 in the middle pair. No doubt, 1 is a wider based sheep that has more tone and shape of muscle from his rack back into his leg. To add to this, I find him to be a heavier weight lamb and he should go to the cooler with more product from his 13th rib back. Yes, 3 is more correct in his body depth. However, for me he goes third, because 3 is clearly the lightest muscled, thickest hided lamb in the class, that is a bit too stale. • Now, in the bottom pair of lambs that differ in composition I elected to use the leaner lamb and placed 3 over 2. I predict he will have an advantage in yield grade because he handles leaner down his spine and is especially cleaner over his forerib. On the other hand 2 is a more muscular sheep. He has a bolder shape of muscle over his rack, a fuller loin edge and more volume to his leg. Nonetheless, I placed him fourth. Not only is he short bodied, but he is clearly the softest handling, most overdone lamb in the class.By Drew Obermeyer from K-State
  66. 66. Market Lambs: Reasons Example # 2 • I placed the Market Lambs 4132. In my top pair I placed 4 over 1. 4 is the heaviest muscled, largest framed and most correct in his degree of finish. I grant that 1 has a larger leg, but I faulted him and placed him second because he is heavier conditioned. • In my middle pair I place 1 over 3. 1 is wider based and more expressive in his muscle shape. I grant that 3 is cleaner and trimmer in his middle, but I faulted him and place him 3rd. He is light muscled and narrow constructed. • In my bottom pair I placed 3 over 2. 3 is leaner made sheep that I would expect to rail a higher cutability carcass. I grant 2 for being heavier muscled, but I place him fourth, He is the shortest bodied and fattest made sheep in the class.By Drew Obermeyer from K-State
  67. 67. Market Lambs: Reasons Example # 3 • My preferred alignment of the market lambs is 4132, starting the class with a more massive muscular lamb who remains stronger down his top. 4 is a long bodied lamb who spreads a squarer shape over his rack, spans wider over his loin and has a longer, wider, deeper tying leg, which leads me to believe that he should rail more pounds of trimmed hindsaddle. I understand that 1 has more expression of muscle throughout his leg, yet he also is narrower made and sharper over his shoulder. • However in my middle pair it is 1s advantage in both Muscularity and expression that aligns him over 3. 1 has more expression over muscle over his crisper, firmer rack and carries this back through his more defined loin and into his bolder more dimensional leg. This suggests that he should simply rail a carcass that is totally freer of fat. Yes, 3 is more opened up in his chest floor, but he also is plainer and nondescript in his design, and appears to be heavier conditioned. • In my concluding pair of heavier conditioned lambs, I preferred the added length and volume of 3. 3 is a taller, longer patterned lamb, who is more attractive on the profile and is more extended from his last rib back. I understand that 2 is deeper bodied, but he also is the heaviest conditioned, lightest muscled lamb of the class.By Drew Obermeyer from K-State
  68. 68. Learn Your Anatomy
  69. 69. Learn Your Wholesale Cuts of Lamb
  70. 70. Learn Your Retail Cuts of Lamb
  71. 71. How to Calculate Cuts• Best Score is 50• Calculate by adding the “Drop”• Cuts are 3 numbers-- for Top Pair, Middle Pair and Bottom Pair• Total cannot exceed 15 points• Example – Placing 4321 – Official 4231 – Cuts 7-3-4 – Score 47 (Switched middle pair)
  72. 72. How to Calculate Cuts• Illustration: Ask: Is 2 over 1? – My Placing: 2134 Is 2 over 4? Is 2 over 3? – Official Placing: 2143 Is 1 over 4? Is 1 over 3? – Cuts: 5-3-2 Is 4 over 3? No, so minus 2 – Score: 48
  73. 73. How to Calculate Cuts• Illustration: Ask: Is 2 over 1? No, so minus 5 – My Placing: 1234 Is 2 over 4? Is 2 over 3? – Official Placing: 2143 Is 1 over 4? Is 1 over 3? – Cuts: 5-3-2 Is 4 over 3? No, so minus 2 – Score: 43
  74. 74. How to Calculate Cuts• Illustration: Ask: Is 2 over 1? – My Placing: 2314 Is 2 over 4? Is 2 over 3? – Official Placing: 2143 Is 1 over 4? No, so minus 3 Is 1 over 3? No, so minus 5 (3+2) – Cuts: 5-3-2 Is 4 over 3? No, so minus 2 – Score: 40 The simple bust.
  75. 75. How to Calculate Cuts• Illustration: Ask: Is 2 over 1? – My Placing: 4213 Is 2 over 4? No, so minus 8 Is 2 over 3? – Official Placing: 2143 Is 1 over 4? No, so minus 3 Is 1 over 3? – Cuts: 5-3-2 Is 4 over 3? – Score: 39 The simple bust.
  76. 76. How to Calculate Cuts• Illustration: Ask: Is 2 over 1? No, so minus 5 – My Placing: 3142 Is 2 over 4? No, so minus 8 (5 +3) Is 2 over 3? No, so minus 10 (5+3+2) – Official Placing: 2143 Is 1 over 4? Is 1 over 3? No, so minus 5 (3+2) – Cuts: 5-3-2 Is 4 over 3? No, so minus 2 – Score: 20 The major bust.
  77. 77. Now, You Try It• Example: – My Placing: 2431 – Official Placing: 2413 – Cuts: 5-4-3 – Score:
  78. 78. Now, You Try It• Example: – My Placing: 3124 – Official Placing: 1234 – Cuts: 3-2-5 – Score:
  79. 79. Now, You Try It• Example: – My Placing: 1234 – Official Placing: 3124 – Cuts: 2-3-7 – Score:
  80. 80. Now, You Try It• Example: – My Placing: 1324 – Official Placing: 4213 – Cuts: 4-3-2 – Score:
  81. 81. Now, You Try It• Example: – My Placing: 1234 – Official Placing: 4321 – Cuts: 2-5-2 – Score:
  82. 82. Taking Notes on Your Steno Pad• Get several steno pads for livestock judging• Keep notes in them• I still have my steno pads from livestock judging at Lake Land & Texas A & M University
  83. 83. Getting Ready for the Contest• Get your steno pad set-up the night before• Fill in the information about the classes the day of the contest• Columns for your placing, the official placing, official cuts, and your score• This will be your “Master Score Sheet”• Identify Questions and/or Reasons Classes• Identify Classes where there will be EPD’s available
  84. 84. Setting Up Notes for Questions• There’s no one right way to do this – This is how I set-up my notes for question classes• Need to take notes on “identification” (e.g., tick- backed Hereford heifer), positives, and negatives – Will also get questions on comparison• Make sure to write down your placing• The goal is to take accurate enough notes to jog your memory later
  85. 85. Taking Notes for Questions Classes• Write down whatever comes to mind• Can be a useful exercise to help rank the animals
  86. 86. Another Way to Take Notes for QuestionsAgain, there’s no one“right way” – Find what works for you
  87. 87. Trick for Questions• Write your placing down on answer sheet – Will help job your memory – Place on scantron away from the circles
  88. 88. Oral Reasons• Overview: Explaining to a judge why you chose to place the animals the way you did• Judged on the correctness of the reasons (even if different than the official) and overall presentation• 50 points maximum• Should be 60-90 seconds
  89. 89. Taking Notes for Reasons• Divide your notebook into 3 pair – Top pair – Middle pair – Bottom pair• Then you’ll divide it in half again – Positives & negatives
  90. 90. Strategy for Reasons Notes• Top Pair – Why 1st Place beats all the rest – Why 1st is better than 2nd place – How the 1st place animal could improve – How 2nd place might be better than 1st place – Why the 2nd place animal is second – Don’t forget to mention ID’s
  91. 91. Reason Notes• Middle Pair – Is it a close decision? – Why second place beats third place – How second place can be improved – How third place may be better than second place – Why 3rd place animal is in third place
  92. 92. Reason Notes• Bottom Pair – Is it a close decision? – Why third place beats fourth place – How third place can be improved – How fourth place may be better than third place – Why 4th place animal is in fourth place• Transitions
  93. 93. Cari’s Reasons Tricks• I use my notes to help visualize the animals – I “see” the animals as I give my reasons – If I forget what I memorized, I just talk about the animals• I talked outloud to myself to practice (don’t worry about what others think of you – you’ll beat them!)
  94. 94. Cari’s Reasons Tricks• I memorized one pair at a time – Got the first pair down before moving on to the second pair• Smile.. But not too much. Be pleasant and upbeat but not cheesy• Articulation and strong voice – Emphasize important words – Think about pauses• Dress professionally
  95. 95. Cari’s Reasons Tricks• As a woman, I was taught to turn slightly to make me look more feminine• Pay attention to posture• Remember that the judges want to hear the “big points” – Don’t get too carried away in the details• Say “Good Afternoon” and “Thank You” (confidently)
  96. 96. Cari’s Reasons Tricks• If you don’t feel confident in your placing, then stay away from words like “easily,” “unquestionably” and “without a doubt” – use soft language – Remember to talk the differences – Doing well in reasons is about describing the animals accurately and giving a good presentation – If you “see” the animals correctly, it’s okay to place them differently
  97. 97. Sample ReasonsPlacing: 4-3-2-1Cuts: 3-5-3• I placed this class of feedlot steers 4-3-2-1.• In the top pair of steers comparable in finish, I placed 4 over 3 due to his advantage in muscling. Ideally, I would like to see 4 more structurally correct through his shoulder, however, the bald-faced steer shows more shape and natural thickness down his top and through his hip, and stands wider based when viewed from the rear. He should hang a carcass with the highest percent of saleable product in the class. No doubt, 3 is more structurally correct, particularly through the shoulder and deeper bodied. However, he is narrower topped and flatter through the quarter than the class winner, so he is second.• It is easily 3 over 2 in the middle pair. He is the nicer balanced steer that better combines yield and quality grade. He is freer of waste through the lower 1/3 of his body and shows more muscle expression down his top and through his quarter.• In the bottom pair, its 2 over 1 due to his advantage in market readiness. He is carrying more finish over his fore and rear rib and should be safer into the choice grade. I realize that 1 is the leaner. However, he is the least market ready as he runs out of finish over his rear rib. He is also the lightest muscled, narrowest made steer in the class that should hang the least amount of red meat, so he is last.From Louisiana State University,Department of Animal Science
  98. 98. More Info on Oral Reasons & EPD’sPlease get out theLivestock JudgingManual from Lake LandCollege*We’ll go throughseveral sections
  99. 99. Additional Resources• Livestock Judging.com – http://www.livestockjudging.com/free_livestock_judging_practice_clas ses.aspx• Judging 101 – http://www.judging101.com/• Animal Science 101 – www.animalscience101.com
  100. 100. Please Stay in Touch• Send Me Snail Mail: 535 Fifth Avenue, 4th Floor, New York, NY 10017• Call Me: (212) 427-2049 (office)• Email Me: cari@rinckerlaw.com• Visit My Website: www.rinckerlaw.com• Read My Food & Ag Law Blog: www.rinckerlaw.com/blog• Tweet Me: @CariRincker @RinckerLaw• Facebook Me: www.facebook.com/rinckerlaw• Link to Me: http://www.linkedin.com/in/caririncker• Skype Me: Cari.Rincker

×