Redapt - Designing your Private and Hybrid Cloud

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RightScale Conference Santa Clara 2011: Learn how to architect and size your private and hybrid cloud infrastructures for the future. This talk will include information on building a private or hybrid cloud that can accommodate legacy applications while still providing flexibility for future application architectures. Learn how to build out cloud infrastructures that handle unique characteristics of legacy applications while providing elasticity and flexibility for future applications. Topics include securing and segregating data, elastic demand, and accommodating mixed workloads on bare metal and hypervisors, as well as how to reduce data center waste while increasing application to hardware efficiency.

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  • Design for Federation in Mind --> Size Does matter\n1 resource pool, many locations\n
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  • Choice Commercial, Open source BOTH --> Next lets find some gear\n
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  • vending machine \nATM \n
  • it’s important to have a future ready development cloud so that your developers can architect and build new applications on a cloud  platform/ model\na private cloud that mimics the public cloud environments.\ntesting / proof of concept for your production hybrid cloud. Hardware to VM ratios i.e Ugoo\n\n
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  • The cloud provides infinite scalability; but you cannot leverage this scalability if your architecture is not scalable.\n\nPeople say “design for failure and nothing will fail”. Not necessarily true, however you should, as much as possible, consider all components of your application ephemeral. Meaning, if something dies, that’s ok, the architecture is resilient to failure.\n\n\n
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  • Scale Up:\n- successful web applications follow this\n- distribute application components\n- federate their datasets\n- employ service-oriented design\n- before rightscale, requires predicting demand and deploying hardware before demand.\n\n
  • Historically, scaling out requires predictive demand.\nElastic compute: eliminates this concept.\n
  • Think about a “build machine” that runs nightly builds... it sits around all day completely un-utilized until 2am when it runs a nightly build. How about provisioning that for 2 hours at 2AM to run the build, then de-provision it when you’re done? \n
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  • It’s one thing to build applications that don’t have persistent state or that can’t easily fail over to other components. However most applications stop here; they don’t build in the failover detection and automation. \n\nDe-couple your components using message queues; avoid synchronous communication\n\nautomate your infrastructure\n\nbootstrap: build your instances to ask “what role am I” upon boot. Use puppet or chef to automate the configuration of these “roles” upon boot.\n
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  • How will you be able to leverage multiple corp zones and multiple public clouds\nPuppet, Chef, RightScale\n\n- future is containers, data centers may go away\n- scale out, think big, be able to scale fast\n- some people think they are big because they have a couple of data centers; this isn’t nearly as scalable as the data center container architecture.\n\n
  • - you can start with just one server\nDesign to grow to multiple private and public clouds\nProduction-ready cloud with 3 servers\nSelect 3 applications\nSelect 10 servers to P2V into your new dev test cloud\n\n- transition in steps:\n- start with dev cloud; find infra through capacity planning\n- automate everything from the outset\n\n
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