Rider Faculty Presentation

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Rider Faculty Presentation

  1. 1. Why Service Learning? Connecting Your Curriculum to Real World Experiences
  2. 2. Why Service-Learning Multiple-Level Engagement Advocacy Students present findings to School Board Forum Organize public forum on school lunch Issue Brief School lunch programs, farm-to-school, obesity Research Evaluate student attitudes toward nutrition Training Workshops for new Board & Staff Summer Manage summer program & plan for Fall Team Help expand to other Schools in District Regular Coach students in School Garden Club 1x Plant School Garden for Orientation Service www.bonner.org
  3. 3. Community-Based Research
  4. 4. Community-Based Research: What is it? A collaborative, participatory research process that embraces: • Research - Community agencies have information needs - Campus partners have research tools and resources • Education - Community members have valuable local knowledge & experience - Campus partners have theoretical and technical knowledge • Action - Build organizational and community capacity - Effect policy change www.bonner.org
  5. 5. Community-Based Research: Source of Questions Plan Decide • Needs & Asset • Model Programs Assessment • Policy Options • Issue Analysis • Resources Evaluate Implement • Program Evaluation direct service • On-Going Data Collection or advocacy www.bonner.org
  6. 6. Community-Based Research: Principles of Practice • Research need(s) defined by community • Research is action-oriented • All stages of process involve all partners equitably (faculty, students, and community) • Strengths and knowledge of all partners appreciated and utilized • Findings disseminated in accessible way www.bonner.org
  7. 7. Community-Based Research: Why do it? • Complex social problems ill-suited to “outside expert” research alone • Impact community capacity • Build long-term relationship with community partners • Effective method of teaching and learning for all participants www.bonner.org
  8. 8. Community-Based Research: Example — Elijiah’s Promise • Beginning: traditional soup kitchen placement • Later: - survey of client identified need for bag lunches - community asset mapping project to identify local food distributors - researched model programs - implemented new bag lunch program • Current: - examine nutritional value of menu - overhauled menu to include more fresh fruits & vegetables www.bonner.org
  9. 9. Community-Based Research: What does it take? • Time • Long-term vision • Communication • Flexibility • Willingness to develop research process with community input www.bonner.org
  10. 10. Civic Engagement Certificate
  11. 11. Civic Engagement Certificate Knowledge • Public Policy • Poverty • International perspective and issues • Issue-based knowledge • Place-based knowledge • Diversity www.bonner.org
  12. 12. Civic Engagement Certificate Knowledge — Academic Connections • Intensive • Multi-Year • Developmental • Course Connections • Minor, Certificate, Concentration www.bonner.org
  13. 13. Civic Engagement Certificate Knowledge — Academic Connections www.bonner.org

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